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HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 

OF THE 

MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY 

reH73 

Bequest of 
WILLIAM BREWSTER 



JJmU^Aa/ //, /^0 





WILLIAM BREWSTER 



DEC 4 1920 







A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO EVERYTHING THE 

NAME IMPLIES 



t^w 



volume vni. 

JANUARY, 1898, TO JUNE, J 898 



*£& 



G. O, SHIELDS (Coquina), Editor and Manager 



*£ 



NEW YORK: 

19 W. Twenty-fourth Street 
1898 

u 



COPYRIGHT 189S, BY G. O. 6HIELD6 




INDEX TO VOLUME VHI. 



" He bounded up, with me on his back, and away he went like the wind" Frontispiece. page 

Ernest S. Thompson 

A Caribou Ride Geo. Gillard 3 

Hunting with a Camera, II. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 5 

My Catch. Poem .. . , L. T. Sprague 6 

Shooting Sea Lions. Illustrated Edward W. Wild 9 

A Letter from Mr. Wood Duck. Illustrated John Boyd ii 

A New England Trout Preserve. Illustrated H. W. 13 

Crater Lake. Illustrated Prof. B. W, Evermann 18 

Cruising on Puget Sound Geo. G. Cantwell 21 

A Ferox Trout. Poem Geo. H. Gorman 23 

The Grounds for a Great ' ' Zoo. ' ' Illustrated . W. T. Hornaday 25 

The Upper Mistassini. Illustrated W. F. J. M'Cormick 26 

Elkland, V. Illustrated Ernest S. Thompson 33 

The Chief Cook. (Poem) W.H.Nelson 34 

The Voice of the Turtle. Illustrated B.J. R. 35 

The Doctor's Buffalo Hunt Capt. J. H. Sands, U. S. A. 36 

The Wolf Question J. B. Jennett, H. M. Brown, and Others 38 

" After the report the elk made a few jumps and fell dead." Frontispiece 

In the Olympic Mountains. Illustrated C. C. Maring 87 

Hunting with a Camera, III. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 99 

A Bear and Some Scared Hunters. Illustrated C. G. Shepard 103 

Hunting Indians in a Fog. Illustrated Lieut. C. B. Hardin, U. S. A. 105 

To Save the Muskalonge. Illustrated Ben. S. Dean hi 

An Albino Deer. Illustrated W. H. N. 113 

Canadian Fishing. Illustrated John Boyd 113 

Elkland, VI. Illustrated Ernest S. Thompson 117 

Among the Reeds. Illustrated Wilmot Townsend 119 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition A.J. Stone 121 

At Round Lake, in the Adirondacks Seaver A. Miller 122 

A Cute Old Fox Eugene C. Derby 123 

The Associated Pirates E. T. Keyser 125 

The Wolf Question Ernest S. Thompson 126 

A Running Bucker. Frontispiece .~ Frederic Remington 

The Wolf that Got Away. Illustrated Lieut. E. L. Munson, U. S. A. 171 

' ' The next instant, the hound went whirling down " Ernest S. Thompson 172 

On Educating the Horse. Illustrated Dr. J. C. Hennessy 174 

Some Deer, a Bear, and a Moose. Illustrated W.H.Wright 178 

Hunting with a Camera, IV. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 182 

Northern Sharp-Tail Grouse. Illustrated John Boyd 184 

A Night's Bass-Fishing F. L. Davis 185 

Quail in Winter A. Jessup 187 

The Bear Story Our Visitor Told E. L. Kellogg 188 

Wild Turkeys in the Sunk Lands John W. Prather 189 

An Elk Hunt J. B. Jennett (Old Silver Tip) 190 

God's Language. Poem Edward G. Allanson 191 

The Alaska Peninsula . L. L. Bales 192 

The Biped Swine. Poem S. B. M'Manus 193 

A Car-load of Ducks J. B. A. 194 

He Got the Coon Adella Washer 195 

Our First Load of Meat E. P. Jaques 195 

The Associated Pirates, II. E. T. Keyser 197 

In Mexico Ed. Williams 198 

A Coon and Some Yams Elliot C. Brown 200 

Climbing Mountains on Wheels ■>. Lincoln M. Miller 200 

A Canoe Cruise in Northern Minnesota S. B. Buckmaster, M.D. 202 

International Items F. L. Oswald 203 

An Exciting Bear Hunt A. Plummer 205 



* ' The ship forged ahead, before the ever-increasing gale, into the waste of unknown waters. ' ' page 

Frontispiece 

Dreams over a Driftwood Fire. Illustrated Chas. Pryer 255 

Three Great Apes. I. The Gorilla. Illustrated W. T. Hornaday 259 

Hunting with a Camera. Illustrated E.S.Thompson 263 

My Adirondack Lodge. Poem. Illustrated L. C. Whiton 265 

Goats and Rocks. Illustrated Dr. A A. Law 267 

A North Carolina Quail Hunt , H. B. H. 269 

How to Measure an Animal E. S. Thompson 271 

When Goes the Ice. Poem F. C. R. 272 

Two Peas H. W. Dresser 273 

The Story of a Hat. Poem. Illustrated David Bruce 275 

For New Fly Casters. Illustrated Ralph L. Montague 276 

How to Cast a Fly R. F. Sh affner 279 

Her Answer. Poem Edith Brownlee 280 

My First Coon Hunt H. L. Krueder 281 

The Great Northern Diver J. A. Mackenzie 282 

Blackfishing on Long Island Sound E. M. Leete 284 

Two Moose Near Mt. Katahdin Elfir 285 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition.— Hunting the Big Horn in the Chee-on-nees A. J. Stone 286 

Mary had a Little Calf. Poem Dave Cory 288 

A Turkey Hunt in Virginia E. D. Christian, Jr. 289 

When Passiflora Blooms Agnes M. Andrews 304 

Reckless Shooting E. A. Brininstool 305 

A Fight with a Rainbow W. H. Hollis 316 

Sportsylvania. Poem H. H. Richardson 328 

' ' My next shot struck one of their horses in the neck, and horse and rider rolled on the plain ' ' . Frontispiece 

A Scouting Adventure W. Jackson 339 

Hunting with a Camera. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 341 

A Lullaby G. A. Mack 345 

A Tenderfoot in a Cow Camp Paul E. Vollum 347 

A Bout with a 'Longe F. H. Zeigler 349 

The Music of the Reel. Poem Leonard Hulit 350 

A ' ' Rassle ' ' with Conscience Ernest Russell 353 

A Loon Chase in a Canoe W. S. Bates 354 

Officers of the L. A. S. Illustrated 357 

Hunting Dangerous Game. Illustrated E. L. Brown 361 

Mammals of the Yellowstone National Park. Illustrated E. S. Thompson 365 

Two Days with the Ducks H. C. D. 372 

Sunshine and Shadows of Camp Life Herbert Pearsall 373 

How to Train a Beagle W. L. Blinn 388 

Two Deer at One Shot F. W. M. 389 

Launching the Ship. Poem Edward W. Mason 389 

Castles in Spain. Poem S. Almon Trout 393 

In Letters of Gold R. B. Buckham 398 

The Microbe Killer Old Silver Tip 400 

Too Much for Him. Poem 40, 

Hogs . Poem 405 

In Buffalo Days Capt. D. Robinson, U. S. A. 412 

' ' He sallied forth, growling horribly and giving me a fine view of his open mouth " Frontispiece 

Tiger Shooting in India. Illustrated Lieut. J. P. Webster 419 

On Cape Cod Marshes. Illustrated Waldo 421 

Ducks and Quails in Florida H. B. Allen 423 

The Rocky Mountain Sheep. Poem, Illustrated W. T. Hornaday 425 

The Pompano of the Indian River Julia C. Welles 427 

Puget Sound Salmon E. L. Kellogg 430 

Canoeing from Boston to Boston " Joseph F. Roche 433 

In Robin Time . Poem Leonard Hulit 434 

A Novel Goat Hunt. Illustrated O. D. Hoor 437 

Camping at Lake Chelan, Washington. Illustrated C. C. Maring 439 

Queer Patients and Queer Physicians James Weir, Jr., M.D. 445 

Women in Camp Mrs. S. E. Abbott 449 

A Day in June. Poem W.C.Kepler 467 

Quail in the Long Marsh G. O. H. 481 

A Modern Wooer. Poem Edward W. Mason 482 

On Hayden Lake L. L. Bales 492 

A League of American Sportsmen 154, 233, 317, 401, 477 

From the Game Fields 44, 128, 206, 290,374,452 Publisher's Department 70, 242,326,410,489 

Fish and Fishing 57, 141, 217, 301, 385, 463 Bicycling 72, 156, 241, 324, 408, 483 

Guns and Ammunition 61, 145, 226, 306, 390, 468 Canoeing 75, 159, 238, 322, 406, 481 

Natural History 65, 149, 230, 311, 394, 472 Book Notices 79, 161, 246, 487 

Editor's Corner 69,, 153, 236, 320, 404 Amateur Photography 80, 164, 248, 331, 415, 495 



VOLUME VIII. 
NUMBER 1 



JANUARY, 1898 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




Z 

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This issue of Recreation is 65.000 Copies. Books, Printer's Bills, Post- 
office Receipts, and News Co.'s Orders shown to any one asking: to see them. 




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ADDRESS w.J. BLACK. 

G.P.A,A.T.6S.R Ry, 

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RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1896, by G. O. Shields 

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



19 West 24.TH Street, 

New York. 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 



" He bounded up, with me on his back, and away he went like the wind." Frontis- 
piece. Ernest S. Thompson. 

A Caribou Ride Geo. Gillard 

Hunting with a Camera, II. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 

My Catch. (Poem) Lynn Tew Sprague 

Shooting Sea Lions. Illustrated Edward W. Wild 

A Letter from Mr. Wood Duck. Illustrated John Boyd 

A New England Trout Preserve. Illustrated H. W. 

Crater Lake. Illustrated Prof. B. W. Evermann 

Cruising on Puget Sound Geo. G. Cantwell 

A Ferox Trout. (Poem) Geo. H . Gorman 

The Grounds for a Great " Zoo." Illustrated W. T. Hornaday 

The Upper Mistassini. Illustrated W. F. J. M'Cormick 

Elkland, V. Illustrated Ernest S. Thompson 

The Chief Cook. (Poem) W. H. Nelson 

The Voice of the Turtle. Illustrated B. J. R. 

The Doctor's Buffalo Hunt Capt. J. H. Sands, U. S. A. 

The Wolf Question J. B. Jennett, H. M. Brown, and Others 

A League of American Sportsmen, Gov. W. A. Richards, J. E. Pratt, and Others 



From the Game Fields . 

Fish and Fishing 

Guns and Ammunition . 

Natural History 

Editor's Corner 



44 

57 
61 

65 
69 



Publisher's Department. 

Bicycling 

Canoeing 

Book Notices 

Amateur Photography. . 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, i£ 



Page 



3 

5 
6 

9 
11 

13 

18 
21 
23 
25 
26 

33 
34 
35 
36 
38 

39 
70 
72 
75 
79 
80 




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RECREATION. ix 

A Little Philosophy 

Let us reason together for a moment. 

A little philosophy now and then does not come amiss. 

Many people do not take enough fat in their food. The 
system craves it, but the palate rebels. Such people grow thin 
and suffer from fat-starvation. 

Are you too thin in flesh ? Have you the nervousness, the 
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If your system needs more fat, why not take more of it with 
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RECREA TION. 



N. Y. 3316.— Ed. 6—25,000. 



Memorandum op Weight. 



DATE OF MAILING. 




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U..1..0.Z. ...,189? 



Received from 
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No. 1 Sack, 3 lbs. 



No. 2 Sack, 2 lbs. 5 oz. 



TARE. GROSS WEIGHT. 



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RECREA TION. 



XI 



(38) 




ORDER from the- PERIODICAL DEPT. of 
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RECREA TION. 



Xlll 




XIV 



HECKEA TION. 




1 Sportsmen's Cabinets 



3 
3 

■38' 

i 

1 
1 

3 

3 
3 

I 

1 

3 

3 
3 

1 



as 




A MOST USEFUL ARTICLE FOR ANY SPORTSMEN 
A REALLY BEAUTIFUL PIECE OF FURNITURE 

Last year at this season we sold more of them than we could make. 
This year we can supply all orders promptly. 

These elegant cabinets are made of quarter sawed antique oak, top and 
bottom handsomely carved, all parts hand-polished — double thick glass doors. 

A special feature is a strong folding table, which locks automatically when 
raised, and can be used as loading-table or writing-desk. 

The Cabinet stands 6 feet high, 31 inches wide, and 12 inches deep. Nearly 
500 of them have been sold and everybody satisfied. Price, crated, f . 0. b. 
New York, $35.00 net. Special sizes made to order. 



Christmas Presents If 



1 



I 

1 

1 
1 



1 



2 HENRY C. SQUIRES & SON, 20 Cortlandt St., New York » 






S(JWfiWfifiwr#if#JWWf.ifififififififififjfifififjc 



RECREATIOX. 







i^yzz^-£ 













Pabst Malt Extract, 

The "BEST" Tonic, 

is recommended to build up 
the convalescent, strengthen 
the weak and overworked, 
and produces sound, refresh- 
ing sleep. 
At Druggists. 



Some idea may be formed of the 
magnitude of the Pabst Brewing 
Co*, manufacturers of 

Pabst Malt Extract, 

The "BEST" Tonic, 

when the fact is known that this 
Company has paid in revenue 
taxes to the Government of the 
United States, a sum equivalent 
to the total salaries of all the Pres- 
idents from George Washington 
to William McKinley, and in ad- 
dition, a sum sufficient to com- 
pensate each President at $50,000 
per year for the next J 00 years* 
Merit in the Pabst product has 
made this possible* 





&** 










XVI 



EECREA TION. 



Racine Boat mfa. Co. "SST 



STEAM 

AND 

. . • SAIL 
YACHTS 

LAUNCHES 

IN 

STEEL 

AND 

WOOD . . . 




Marine 
engines 

AND 

BOILERS 

Row Boats 

CANOES 

VAPOR 
MOTORS 



$200 



$250 



A 20th-century Electro Vapor Launch that will seat comfortably six persons, carry 
RllVS ten ' anc ' s l )eec ' s ' x nn ' es P t>r hour, at a maximum cost of iy 2 cents per hour. No 
"* ™ odor, noise, heat or smoke. No government license. Simple and effective, abso- 
lutely safe, and guaranteed for one year, or money refunded. 

This is no row boat, but a well-designed, sea-going Launch, with steel, water-tight bulkheads. 

A modern, up-to-date " Half Rater," designed for racing purposes. Hollow spars, 
Qyirc special sails, Tobin bronze fastenings, gun-metal fittings, lignum-vitae blocks. 
** j Finished in quarter-sawed oak, and guaranteed to be equal to any $350 craft 

turned out. 

Cj. f T * %44r yf'ly/ >C ! Built and carried in stock from 25 ft. up. Write us about them, or call and 
OlCCl JUd-UllCncS inspect them. We guarantee satisfaction. 



$18 Buys 



A fine modeled and well-built Canoe, with paddle and seat. 

A fine modeled Row Boat. Seats three. Fitted with oars and oarlocks. 



We guarantee our work 



We guarantee our prices 



We solicit your wants 




Send 10 cents for large illustrated catalogue, describing our output, consisting of Sea-going Steam Yachts, 
Schooners, Cutters, Sloops, Fin Keels, Knockabouts, Raters, Cat Boats, Sails, Fittings, etc. We can save you 
monev and give you results. Address 

RACINE BOAT MFG. CO., Riverside, Racine, Wis. 

Chicago Salesroom, 62-64 Wabash Avenue 




'•HE BOUNDED UP, WITH ME ON HIS BACK, AND AWAY HE WENT LIKE THE WIND." 



RECREATION. 



Volume VIE. JANUARY, 1898, Number J. 

G. 0. SHIELDS (CQQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



A CARIBOU RIDE. 

GEORGE GILLARD. 



Recreation finds its way into I selected an old stag- for my mark, 
Newfoundland and is eagerly read and just as they landed I fired. The 
by many of our people. It is cer- shot entered the side of his head 
tainly a^ meritorious work. The il- and he ran about a, mile before fall- 
lustrations are remarkably true to ing. I followed and found him ap- 
nature, and the stories are instruc- parently dead, stretched out on a 
tive and entertaining, in a high de- marsh. As I straddled him to cut 
gree. his throat, the knife having passed 

Some changes have been made in entirely through it without him 

our game laws. The close time on moving, he bounded up, with me 

caribou is now February istto July on his back, and away he went like 

15th, and October 7th to 20th. This the wind. He ran about 200 yards, 

gives sportsmen 5 or 6 weeks' hunt- dropping the knife out of his throat 

ing before rutting time. Then 13 in his mad career. I held on to him 

days in which to preserve skins, until I found a favorable opportu- 

antlers, etc. Then the sport can nity to drop off, when I returned for 

begin again, for a few weeks. Part my rifle. Then I followed him up 

of the rutting time may also be until I s:ot a second shot. This time 

spent in hunting bear, beaver, otter I made sure work, securing a lot of 

or sea fowl, and in fishing. meat and a fine pair of antlers. 

There is now a fine steamer cross- It was an exciting ride yet I was 

ing the gulf, to and from Cape Bre- not in the least frightened, for I 

ton, and at the West end of the Isi- knew I could go wherever the cari- 

and. This will be a great benefit bou could. 

to tourists and sportsmen coming Another time we were on the 

here, from your side of the water. same ground, early in September, 

The caribou begin to cross our and caught 2 fawns. In 3 weeks we 

hunting grounds early in Septem- had them so tame they would follow 

ber, from North to South, swim- us wherever we went, not even of- 

ming whatever ponds or rivers fering to run away when bands of 

come in their way, in herds of 20 to caribou were in sight. 

120, and sometimes more. I counted Lynx are plentiful but to get 

one herd, last September, with 130 them one must resort to trapping, 

in it. We have some good salmon and 

Six years ago 1 was hunting in trout fishing, at the foot of Hall's 

the vicinity of Indian lake when I bay, at the entrance of the rivers, 

noticed 5 caribou crossing the lake, about the middle of July. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. H. ASHCROFT. 

TEN O'CLOCK AND ONLY 13- 



HUNTING WITH A CAMERA. 
II. 



W. E. CARLIN. 



The little pine squirrel, Sciurus richard- 
soni, is abundant in the Bitter Root moun- 
tains, where we spent the summer; yet we 
found him a difficult subject to photograph. 
He is a busy little body and as nervous as a 
French dancing master. At times he is un- 
duly familiar with visitors; at other times 
he resents intrusion in the most emphatic 
manner. His scolding and " sassing " have 
cost many a hunter many a shot at deer, 
elk or other game; for all the birds and 
beasts of the woods know this little chick- 
aree as a vigilant and faithful sentinel. 




"I WONDER WHO'S DOWN THERE." 

He comes as near being perpetual mo- 
tion as any animal I ever saw. Even when 
he stops to rest, or to bask in the sun, he 
is ever turning, twisting and listening; 
whisking his tail and pricking his ears in 
the hope of seeing or hearing something 
to bark at. 

The telephoto lens, with which we did 
our best work on live animals and birds, 
requires a comparatively slow exposure, 
and Mr. Chickaree would never wait for it 
to " go off." We were therefore compelled 
to use our Bausch & Lomb Zeiss, series 
vii., 16^2 inch focus, working at F. 12.5. 



The prints from which these cuts were 
made are on Velox paper, which we find the 
best we have yet tried, for live bird and 
animal photographs. It gives better ef- 
fects, for this class of work, than any other 
paper I know of. 

Late in September we found an old snag, 




" LOOKS LIKE AN INDIAN." 

about a mile from camp, where our neigh- 
bor was wont to go for an occasional rest 
from the labor of harvesting pine cones, 
which he was storing up for a rainy da) r . 

We set up the camera near this old snag, 
focused on the top of it, and, with 40 feet of 
hose, leading in- 
to a clump of 
bushes, I lay 
down and read 
one of Stanley 
Waterloo's stor- 
ies, while waiting 
for M. Sciurus. 
Finally he 
showed up and I 
pressed the bulb. 
Then I waited 
till he went away, 
so as not to alarm 
him. Then I set 
the shutter and 
waited for him to 
come back; and 
so on. The long- 
est exposure I 
dared make was 
ur of a second. 
The negatives 
were made on 

Carbutt's CUt "I THINK I HEARD 

films. SOMETHING DROP." 





AMATEUR PHOTO BY MRS. W. E. CARLIN. 



THE COMING STORM. 



During the 2 days I had been waiting for 
this little squirrel to pose for me I had been 
favored with good weather; but in the 
afternoon of the second day, just as I ex- 
posed my fourth plate on him, I saw heavy 
black clouds banking up in the West. I 
knew what this meant and made a run for 



camp. I arrived none too soon, for in 5 
minutes a terrific thunder storm burst on us. 
Mrs. Carlin had seen the clouds coming 
up, beyond the lake, and, setting up her lit- 
tle 4 x 5 Premo, got a beautiful picture of 
them, on an Eastman film, which is shown 
herewith. 



MY CATCH. 



LYNN TEW SPRAGUE. 



The day was warm, the fish were shy, 
The mocking stream rolled, laughing, by. 
And seated on its grassy brink 
I watched my fly, and could but think 

Of — not the bass I sought to catch — ■ 
The girl back in the berry-patch. 
The clear and bright September skies 
Were blue as her blue Irish eyes; 



And velvet shadows, here and there, 
Were dark like her dark Irish hair. 
The sun-kissed breeze from out the South 
Was soft as kisses from her mouth, 

And so, beside the purling stream, 
I fell asleep to sweetly dream. 
When, suddenly. I start to feel 
The tight'ning line, the clicking reel, 



And wake with visions of a bass 

To see — my saucy rural lass. 

Her brown hand pulling on my line 

Her eyes with mischief all ashine 

And, what are all the bass e'er weighed 

Beside the witching catch I made. 




CAUGHT IN THE WATERS OF ST. CLAIR FLATS, MICH., BY H. LEE BORDEN, OF CHICAGO. 



The picture with this number of the Occasional represents 
one day's catch of magnificent fish in St. Clair flats by H. 
Lee Borden, Esq., of Chicago, owner of the famous steam 
Yacht Penelope, so well known in the waters of St. Clair. 
Mr. B. is one of the most accomplished fishermen in the lake 
region. The picture tells its own story. — From The Occa- 
sional, published by the Phoenix Insurance Co. 

Enough said. Any reader of Recrea- 
tion can tell you about the length of Mr. 
Borden's bristles, after looking at the rec- 
ord of his butchery. — Editor. 



I am sending you a sepia drawing of 
wood ducks, which I trust will please you.* 
Will soon send you one of sharp-tail 
grouse. 

It is a common fault of both taxidermists 
and artists to make the necks of ducks too 
long. They mostly study from a bird killed 
a day or 2 before, or from a preserved speci- 
men. A duck that has been dead a" few 
hours, especially if put into a game pocket 
and tumbled about, loses its natural form. 
The muscles of the neck become flaccid 
and the neck lengthens. Above all the 
skin of the cheeks is dragged down over 
the neck. This latter is the common fault 
of all or nearly all taxidermists. Ducks are 
my hobby and it pains me to see a poor 
picture of them, or a poorlv mounted speci- 
men. Allan Brooks/Vernon, B. C. 




L. L. BALES, ONE OF RECREATION'S 
ALASKAN CORRESPONDENTS. 



* See page n. 



SHOOTING SEA LIONS. 



EDWARD W. WILD. 



About 20 miles South of Astoria, Oregon, 
at the mouth of the Columbia, a rocky- 
promontory, known as Tillamook Head, 
juts into the Pacific, while about a mile off 
shore stands Tillamook light-house, where 
3 men live in seclusion the year round. To 
the Southward lies an unbroken wilderness 
of wooded hills, with a rough coast line, for 
18 miles, to the fertile valley of theNehalem. 
It is a country abounding in big game, not 



I spent a week at a ranch house a mile 
South of Tillamook Head, and 8 miles by 
trail from Seaside, a summer resort. 

The days were filled with delightful ex- 
periences, many of which can never be ef- 
faced from memory; but the one taken for 
this sketch occurred on the day of my ar- 
rival at the ranch. 

I preferred to walk from Seaside, and was 
fortunate to fall in with a Western Union 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY HARRY CHICHESTER, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

SEA LIONS ON THE ROCKS. 



yet familiar to sportsmen, nor in immediate 
danger of depletion. 

An occasional isolated rock along the 
coast presents 2 or 3 acres of guano- 
whitened surface offering a convenient 
roosting-place for myriads of sea fowl. 
Toward evening, the flashing of the light, 
the sighing of the breakers and the music of 
the " singing sands " — so named from the 
shrill note produced by one's feet in walk- 
ing over them — a phenomenon known in 
only a few other spots in the world — and the 
cries of the wild creatures, form a weird 
combination. 



lineman, bound for the same destination. 
We started shortly after sunrise, and greatly 
enjoyed our 8-mile scramble over rocks and 
logs. Near the summit of the mountain we 
stopped to rest. The chief thing that struck 
me as extraordinary was the oppressive si- 
lence of the big woods. Not a bird note 
thrilled on the air, not a squirrel nor a rab- 
bit was seen or heard. 

As we were emerging from the forest at 
the summit of the mountain, a roaring 
sound burst on our ears; now abating, 
again increasing in volume until it seemed 
like the combined bellowing of many bulls. 



IO 



RECREA TION. 



My companion insisted it was nothing 
but the interference of 2 trees; while it 
seemed clear to me a mountain lion was in 
deadly combat with a cinnamon bear. Our 
surprise was therefore mutual when we saw 
scores of sea lions, on the rocks 1,000 feet 
distant, and some 300 feet below. 

My heavy Winchester was at once 
brought into use. We seated ourselves at 
the end of the promontory, and spent an 
hour or more in picking off the lions. 
Every time one of the awkward creatures 
was hit, half a dozen of the nearest would 
fall into the water with him, giving a suc- 



cession of roars. We finally left, well satis- 
fied with our sport. The tide the next day 
brought in ample assurance of the execu- 
tion done. 

These lions consume great numbers of 
cod, salmon and other valuable food fishes, 
so, as they are of no value to commerce, 
their destruction is of public benefit. 

The lions protected on Seal rocks, off 
San Francisco, as a motter of sentiment as 
well as of profit, are the same as those 
killed by us. They are distant cousins 
of the fur bearing seals of the Pribyloff 
islands. 




THE BOSS HEAD. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY RAY GALE. 



Here is a buffalo head that knocks the 
tar out of all of them. Hornaday, Gott- 
schalck, Sheard, J. G. of Middletown, and 
all the other fellows who think they have 
the big head (I mean the big buffalo head) 
can now take a back seat. This old bull's 
head extends from his forefeet nearly to 
his ridge pole, which seems to be about 6 
feet from the ground. In fact, if you squint 
from the ridgepole to the trees in the back- 
ground, which appear to be 30 to 40 feet 
high, you almost wonder where you are at, 
and you can give this head any old length 
you see fit. I have been anxious to know, 
for a long time, who really had the record 



head; and while I have no measurements 
at hand of the one illustrated above, it is 
a clear case that this old bull carries the 
winner. By the way he lives in the City 
Park, at Denver. The animal on the left of 
him is a half blood. There are also 2 half 
blood cows and 2 three-quarter blood 
calves in this Park. 

The old bull was roped on the range near 
Laramie, when a calf, 11 years ago. 

To paraphrase Shakespere: 



' Now in the name of all the gods at once, 
TTnon what grass doth this our Bison feed 
That his head hath grown so great." 



A LETTER FROM MR. WOOD DUCK. 



JOHN BOYD. 



Dear Recreationists: I'm only a wild 
duck. A Wood Duck some people call me, 
because I like to build my nest in a tree, as 
do some of my cousins. Old fogies, calling 
themselves Ornithologists, say my name is 
Aix sponsa, which means " the bride " ; but 
I don't know where they got that. We 
never hear it among ourselves, although I 
cannot say but we deserve the title. 

We can perch on trees, as other birds do, 
without being the least tired, and I do this 
every day when my wife is looking after the 



it when my wife and I were feeding the 
others. I will also show you how we carry 
our little ones from the nest to the water, 
and back again, and if the visitors are will- 
ing to stay until dusk we will put the babies 
to bed, so that all may see us. 

Our nest was made by Daddy Wood- 
pecker. He left it for us because we 
couldn't scoop one out for ourselves. That 
was kind of him, now wasn't it? I wish we 
could stay near our nesting place all the 
year round; we make so many friends 




A PAIR OF WOOD DUCKS. 

See page 7. 



nest and the eggs. Some people would have 
you believe I leave my wife alone with these 
duties; but I do nothing of the sort. She is 
a good little body, and thinks no one can 
do the work like herself; so she insists on 
doing it all, and I can only look on — hen- 
pecked I believe you folks call it. I wouldn't 
desert her like that. Don't ever think it. 

When our young come out of the shells 
it keeps both of us busy to keep them out 
of mischief and danger. And talking about 
danger, I wish you would tell people to 
leave their guns at home when they come 
out our way. We don't like them, and can't 
feel comfortable while they're in sight. If 
you could only get them to do this, I 
wouldn't mind letting them see our little 
family of 12. We had 13, but one was car- 
ried away by a fish hawk, who pounced on 



whom we like, and our stay of 5 months 
seems so short. We would if we could, but 
the winters are so cold, - id we are not 
hardy, like the majority of our cousins. 

Tell that man who runs Recreation that 
we all love him so much for calling down 
those hogs who hunt and kill us, and that if 
he wants to know more about us, we will 
gather around him and show off; for we 
know he has a good heart and that he 
wouldn't hurt us, or let any one else do so. 

Tell the photographer he may come and 
take our picture, as often as he likes; and 
that we will group and pose for him, and 
look our prettiest. But please don't let 
that cruel gunner know where we are. 

Well, Good-by. Oh-eek, Oh-eek. I see 
one of those gun cranks coming now. Oh- 
eek. Oh-eek. 



A NEW ENGLAND TROUT PRESERVE. 



H. W. 



To anyone interested in trout culture a 
visit to the Blue Hills Trout Preserve, near 
Meriden, Conn., must prove deeply inter- 
esting. 

Meriden is but 2^4 hours' ride from New- 
York, and is a charming New England 
city, nestled among the famous " hanging 
hills." 



The basin is so small and apparently so 
wild, that one is tempted to believe himself 
many miles from civilization. 

The Blue Hills Trout Preserve Co. was 
formed about a year ago, by a few gentle- 
men of Meriden, New Britain and Berlin, 
for the purpose of raising trout and of mak- 
ing a desirable place for fly and bait fish- 




BLUE HILLS TROUT PRESERVE. ONE OF THE BREEDING POOLS. 



Arriving at the station we drove North- 
west over a pleasant wooded road which, 
at every turn, presents a charming view to 
the traveller. We wound through a notch 
in the mountain known as " cathole pass," 
and turned round the rock which forms 
what is called " Washington's face." Then 
turning to the right and following the 
winding road a short distance, we de- 
scended into a pretty little valley, shut in on 
all sides by hills, and seeming to have been 
especially designed for the purpose to 
which it has been put. 

Here is a cluster of springs and the gen- 
erous flow of cold water remains at the 
same temperature during the entire year. 



ing. 
far. 



They have succeeded admirably thus 



When the ponds shall have been com- 
pleted, by the construction of necessary 
dams, and stocked with trout from the now 
well filled pools this will certainly be a de- 
lightful resort for the fly fisherman. 

Early in the present year about 350,000 
trout eggs were placed in the hatchery and 
soon began to hatch out. This stage of the 
trout's life is the most interesting and deli- 
cate of all. The little fellow is almost trans- 
parent, when he comes from the egg, and 
is about half an inch long. He has a large 
sac attached to him, of about twice his own 
size, from which he derives his nourishment 



13 




THE BLUE HILLS TROUT PRESERVE; TRANSFERRING FRY. 



until about a month old. Then his diet 
changes. He is now given finely ground 
meat and has to be watched and nursed 
carefully. He also requires plenty of pure, 
cold water. 

Owing to the good management of the 
Blue Hills hatchery the trout have thrived 
wonderfully. 

A series of 20 parallel pools has been 
built, through which water is conveyed 
from the springs by means of pipes and 
flumes. When the trout were a few months 
old they were taken out of the hatchery and 
placed in the pools. 

There are now about a quarter of a mill- 
ion of them, all healthy and vigorous. To 
watch them as they move up and down the 
pools, in solid bodies, reminds one of the 
long winded papers we have all read on 
over population. 

When the company is prepared to open 
the preserve for fishing, which will be in a 
year or 2, it is sure to become one of great 
interest, not only to the angler but to all 
lovers of nature and of fresh air. 

Persons desiring trout fry, for stocking 
public or private waters, can get them here 
in any number desired. 

Besides the hatchery proper, the build- 



ings comprise an ice house, an office, and 
an engine house, in which the meat is pre- 
pared for the trout. 

A unique feature of the hatchery grounds 
is a pair of old oaks which are genuine 
Siamese twins. These venerable trees have 
been standing for nearly a century, and are 
connected by a large horizontal graft, about 
30 feet from the ground. One of the trees 
is much larger above the graft than below; 
showing that it derives much of its nourish- 
ment from its twin. 

The drive back from the preserve was 
over a different and somewhat circuitous 
route. We passed the reservoir from which 
Meriden receives its water supply, and 
through Hubbard Park. The views thus 
obtained are most beautiful. The reservoir 
is a large lake, hemmed in by mountains, 
and reminds one of some of the Adiron- 
dack lakes. 

Hubbard Park is a recent addition to the 
beauties of the city and is the result of the 
generosity of Mr. Walter Hubbard, of 
Meriden. 

On the whole the trip to the Blue Hills 
Trout preserve is a most delightful one, 
and is well worth the time it takes to make 
it. 



14 




THE BLUE HILLS TROUT PRESERVE. THE SIAMESE TWINS. 




DON. 



English setter, owned by E. P. Robinson, Sidney, O. 



FALMOUTH. 

Owned by H. R. Duval, Islip, L. I. Sired by Robert 
the Devil, out of Mr. Duval's Mona. 



IS 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY JOHN BOYD. 



A SLIGHT MISUNDERSTANDING. 




ON THE GRAND CASCAPEDIA. A NOVEL COMBINATION. 
From a photograph kindly loaned by Mr. J. E. Davis. 

16 




LAWRENCE CANOE CLUB DOUB- 
LE-BLADE PADDLING TROPHY. 

This cup cost $100; is 17 inches high, 
is made of silver and lined with gold. It 
is offered by the L. C. C, Lawrence, Mass., 
to be contested for in best and best canoes. 
To become the property of the winner, it 
must be won 3 times in succession, and can 
only be contested for annually, on the Mer- 
rimac river, at Lawrence; the contest to be 
under the management of the L. C. C. The 
last race for this trophy was held Septem- 
ber 29th and was won for the Wawbewawa 
Canoe Assn., by L. S. Drake, Auburndale, 
Mass. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY B. C. PACKER. 

A GOOD DAY FOR BEAR. 



The square piano has four legs, 
The grand has three to its frame; 

The upright has no legs at all, 
But it gets there just the same. 

— Chicago Record. 



17 



CRATER LAKE. 



PROF. B. \V. EVERMANN. 



On the crest of the Cascade mountains, 
in Southwestern Oregon, is Crater Lake, in 
many respects the most wonderful lake in 
the world. It lies in the top of Mount 
Mazama. To reach it one must leave the 
railroad at Ashland, or Medford, and travel 
by wagon road ioo miles Northeastwardly. 



down, and all the bicycles soon became a 
burden. They had to be either pushed 
laboriously, or loaded on the wagons. 
However, the trip would have been less in- 
teresting had it been otherwise. 

We camped, our first night out, on Dead 
Indian creek, drank Dead Indian milk and 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY MISS WINIFRED WATSON. 



CRATER LAKE AND WIZARD ISLAND. 
Llao Rock in the distance. 



There are many hills to cross and dust and 
rocks everywhere, but the trip is more than, 
worth the making. 

It was my good fortune to make this 
journey in August, 1896, as the guest of the 
Mazamas, a prosperous club of jolly moun- 
tain climbers with headquarters at Port- 
land, Ore. 

We left Ashland — 40 odd of us, of whom 
a third were ladies — in strong wagons and 
equipped for camping. 

Four or 5 started out on their wheels. 
The usual haps and mishaps occurred, of 
course, thereby adding spice and variety to 
the journey. One of the wagons broke 



ate Dead Indian butter, because they were 
better than the Ashland product. 

Then we spent 3 days on a side trip to the 
summit of Mount Pitt, while those who 
could not climb mountains, on Sunday, 
spent their time fishing at Pelican bay. 
And when we tried to fill them with regrets, 
by telling of the glories of Mount Pitt, 
they dwelt enthusiastically and in the reg- 
ular worldly way on the delights of fishing 
in Pelican bay; and we loved them all the 
more because their acts were better than 
their creed. 

The pleasures of the journey were many; 
but at this time I desire to write only of the 



18 



CRATER LAKE. 



*9 



lake and our stay on the brink of the 
mighty wall which hems it in. 

On the summit of the Cascade range and 
in the top of one of its most interesting 
peaks lies Crater lake. The top of this 
mountain — recently christened Mount Ma- 
zama — is 8,228 feet above the sea, and in it 
rests the strange lake whose surface is 
nearly 2,000 feet below the wall which sur- 
rounds it. Thus the lake lies in a great pit 
in the mountain's top, and can be reached 
only by scrambling nearly 2,000 feet down- 



level and forms Wizard island. The others 
lie completely buried in the lake. 

To understand the unique character of 
this lake it is necessary to consider, briefly, 
its geologic history. In the first place the 
region is a volcanic one. All the moun- 
tain peaks of the Cascade range, from 
Shasta to Tacoma, and beyond, are vol- 
canoes but recently extinct. All the 
mountain slopes and table-lands are made 
up of immense lava flows. Shasta's sum- 
mit is 14.444 feet above the sea. and Ta- 




COASTING IN THE CRATER OF WIZARD ISLAND. CRATER LAKE. ORE. 



ward, on a trail which is not far from ver- 
tical. 

The average diameter of the top of the 
pit is nearly 6 miles and that of the lake is 
but little less. The depth of the great pit is 
4.000 feet and the depth of the lake is 2.000 
feet. From this it is seen that the pit is 
filled with water just half way to the top. 
The bottom of the pit is 100 feet lower than 
the level of the Klamath marshes, at the 
Eastern foot of the Cascade range. Thus 
if there were a subterranean opening con- 
necting them, the Klamath lakes would not 
completely drain Crater lake. 

In the deepest part of Crater lake the bot- 
tom was found to be a nearly level plain, 
several miles in extent. As described by 
Professor Diller. of the U. S. Geological 
Survey, to the Westward this plain rises 
irregularly, culminating in 2 or more peaks, 
one of which reaches above the water's 



coma is scarcely less. Between them are 
several great mountains, such as the Three 
Sisters, Jefferson, and Hood; but none so 
high as they. 

When the fires were still glowing in this 
volcanic chain, there stood, where Crater 
lake now lies, a great, fiery volcano the 
peer, in size, of any of those now left. The 
evidence is almost, if not entirely, conclu- 
sive that this mountain must have been 
more than 14,000 feet high. It was an ac- 
tive volcano during glacial times. 

Then a great change was wrought in this 
mountain. Instead of flowing out at the 
crater or breaking through the sides, as it 
had long done, the lava finally found an 
exit at some lower level. So great was the 
outflow, through this new channel, that the 
mountain became hollowed to a shell. The 
top of the mountain, being left compara- 
tively without support, fell in and became 



20 



RECREA TION. 



engulfed in the great cavern. Thus more 
than 6,000 feet of the top of the mountain 
disappeared, leaving a truncated cone a lit- 
tle more than 8,000 feet high and about 6 
miles in diameter at the top. In the top of 
this truncated cone is the great pit, 4,000 
feet deep and just half filled with water, as 
already mentioned. 

The lake has practically no shores, for the 
lava wall which hems it in rises almost ver- 
tically, not only from the water's edge but 
from far beneath its surface. This wall is 
500 to 2,000 feet in height, above the lake, 
and so nearly vertical that there are but 2 
or 3 places where it is possible to descend 
to the water. 

In the lake are 2 islands. One of these 
is called the Phantom Ship. It is a small, 
rocky islet, in the Southeast part of the 
lake, and resembles, in a wonderful manner, 
a ship with masts and spars. In clear sun- 
light it is distinctly seen, while at other 
times it appears but dimly, or not at all. 
The other island is in the Western part of 
the lake and is known as Wizard island. It 
is 2 miles from the foot of the trail, by 
which the water is reached from the rim 
above, and is a cinder cone of remarkably 
fresh appearance. It is quite symmetrical 
and rises with a steep slope, on all sides, to 
a height of 845 feet above the surface of the 
lake. In its top is a bowl-shaped crater 
80 feet deep, on the South half of which lies 
a bank of snow that the summer sun never 
entirely melts. Between Wizard island and 
the South shore is another cone which rises 
from the bottom of the lake to within 93 
feet of the surface of the water. 

Crater lake has neither inlet nor outlet, 
so far as known. The precipitation in that 
region is believed to be somewhat greater 
than the evaporation, and it is not unlikely 
that there is a subterranean outlet. 

The water is pure and sweet and of re- 
markable clearness. An ordinary dinner 
plate, let down to a depth of 92 feet, could 
be easily seen. 

When the surface is not disturbed the re- 
flection or mirror of the surrounding wall, 
and of Wizard island, is one of fascinating 
beauty. 

Though remarkably clear, the water of 
Crater lake is the most wonderful blue — 
the bluest blue I have ever seen. It is doubt- 
ful if there is anywhere else in the world a 
lake so marvellously beautiful in color ef- 



fect. In the deep parts the blue is richer 
than the bluest indigo. Where the water is 
less deep, and in the changing lights and 
shadows of the clouds, the colors change 
from ultramarine through cobalt and azure 
blue, to smalt blue and hyacinth, and even 
to royal purple, violet and mauve. So won- 
derfully and strangely beautiful are these 
colors that one never tires of watching and 
studying them. 

Temperature observations, made by Pro- 
fessor U. O. Cox and me, at the lake, proved 
extremely interesting. On August 22 the 
temperature of the surface, near the center 
of the lake, at 1 p.m., was 61 ° Fahr. At a 
depth of 555 feet it was 39 ; at 1,040 feet it 
was 41 °, and at 1,623 feet (which was at the 
bottom, in that place) it was 46 . From 
this it appears that the line of greatest cold 
is neither at the surface nor at the bottom; 
but at some intermediate depth, and the 
conclusion is almost irresistible that the 
lava forming the bottom of the lake has not 
yet entirely cooled, but that it continues 
to give off heat to the water. These ob- 
servations are of unusual interest, but must 
be repeated before they should be accepted 
as final. 

Crater lake, of course, contains no fishes; 
lakes without inlets or outlets seldom or 
never do; for fishes naturally get into one 
body of water only by swimming to it from 
some other body of water with which it is 
connected. Breaks in water continuity, or 
considerable falls, are absolute barriers be- 
yond which fishes can not go. So it is with 
Crater lake. Though the water is suitable, 
and was found by us to contain an abundant 
supply of excellent fish-food, consisting 
chiefly of small crustaceans and insect 
larvae, there are no fishes to feed upon 
them. 

The gratifying success which has attended 
the efforts of the U. S. Fish Commission 
in stocking barren waters elsewhere, not- 
ably Lewis and Shoshone lakes, in the Yel- 
lowstone National Park, gives good rea- 
son for believing that similar results will 
follow the stocking of Crater lake with 
trout. 

Among the places in the United States 
of greatest scenic and scientific interest I 
would name the Yellowstone National 
Park, the Grand canyon. Crater lake, and 
Yosemite; and Crater lake is not the least 
of these. 



The joy the merry urchin shows — 
On Christmas morn — in clover, 

Can't touch the bliss his parent knows 
At night, when all is over. 



CRUISING ON PUGET SOUND. 



GEO. G. CANTWELL. 



On the 3d of August a lively party of us 
left Puyallup, on the electric line, and were 
soon landed at the Tacoma dock where we 
were the guests of Mr. W. A. Stewart, 
bound for a trip down the sound, on his 
trim little yacht. We left our usual identity 
on shore, and once on the boat resolved 
ourselves into the following crew: captain, 
mate, engineer, fireman, cook, naturalist 
and the dog. 

The city of Destiny gradually faded from 
view as the swift little propeller drove us 
through the foaming waters, and things 
were put in ship shape order about the boat. 
Bedding was spread out on the folding 
bunks, in the cabin; the guns and fishing 
tackle were put in handy places, to be ready 
in case of emergency; but the most formid- 
able looking pile of all was the grub, which 
was carefully stored for future use. 

Then we studied our chart. We were 
shortly to be in strange waters, and by the 
aid of the compass we were soon fairly on 
our way toward our destination. Down 
the sound, beyond Seattle, around Point 
No Point, and into the long, narrow sheet 
of water 150 miles into the wilderness, 
known as Hoods Canal. 

Sea birds were abundant on all sides. 
The naturalist identified the ring-billed, 
herring, and Bonapart's gull. Also black 
foresters and least terns, with an occasional 
jaeger or sheerwater. A common bird was 
the pigeon guillemot, locally known as the 
sea pigeon. These frequently flushed from 
the head of the boat, where they would go 
spattering along the water for quite a dis- 
tance before getting fairly on the wing. 
They breed in burrows, in the sand cliffs, 
along shore, and in places the banks are 
fairly honey-combed with their nests. 

Sea coots rode the waves, in little bunch- 
es, but were wild, and occasionally little 
auks would dive about the boat. On al- 
most every bit of floating kelp, or sea-weed, 
we saw the red phalarope; sometimes im- 
mense flocks of them. 

Our first seal put its head out of water 
but a short distance from Tacoma. A shot 
from the .22 rifle caused it to go under 
again; and all along the trip they were fre- 
quently seen. This is a small hairy variety, 
about 4 feet long and of a mottled brown 
color. They are not of much use except 
for the oil of their blubber. 

Wishing to make a certain point before 
dark the engineer called for more " fog," 
and as the steam pressure began to climb 
up something gave way and there was a 
lively scramble, through the escaping 
steam, to the cabin. On investigating the 
matter we found the packing had blown 



out of the cylinder head. This was soon 
replaced and we were on our way again, 
shortly coming to anchor, for the night, in 
a quiet little cove near shore. 

Here the cook's troubles began with a 
howling toothache. Gory tales of the 
back-woods tooth-carpenter, in which the 
artist went at his victim with a hammer and 
chisel, were fresh in his mind; but imagine 
his surprise and relief next morning, as he 
looked up the dentist at Port Blakeley and 
had his aching tooth neatly extracted, by a 
finished operator. 

The weather on our second day ou% 
proved fine, and all hands took life easy, 
loafing about the boat, smoking, reading, 
and swapping lies. The dog had his turn, 
to-day, getting sea-sick, and willingly gave 
up all he had. The way he hung his head 
over the rail and longingly gazed at the 
shore, but a short distance away, was really 
pathetic. 

The naturalist found the collecting quite 
to his liking. He would shoot the birds, 
from the bow of the boat, pick them up as 
we went by and prepare them while on the 
way. One specimen of the rare sabine gull 
was seen, but not collected. 

We camped the next night around a 
point, in quiet water, and preparing a good 
hot supper, on shore, returned to the boat 
and indulged in a game of cards while the 
band played. Evidently the clear notes of 
the mandolin were not wasted on the desert 
air, for presently a mild-eyed seal drifted 
along side and listened to the tangled mess 
of waltzes, polkas and jigs that poured over 
the rail, till the strains of " After the ball " 
were recognized. That was too much, and 
with a haunted look in its beautiful eyes it 
slowly sank beneath the waves. The card 
game also broke up and all hands rolled 
into their bunks. 

Next morning we were off by sunrise, 
breakfast being cooked en route, on the 
gasoline stove. At high noon we landed 
and made camp at the foothills of the 
Olympics, on the Duckabush river. 

We anchored at the mouth, and while 
several of us went up the river for trout, 
taking a variety of flies, angleworms and 
salmon eggs, the rest of the party went 
along the beach and found a good clam 
bed. These men were first back to camp, 
with a sack full of the delicious bivalves. 
They had 3 varieties of small ones — little 
necks, butter clams and cockles — that are 
about the size of oysters; and 2 kinds of 
larger clams, 6 inches or more across. One 
of these is known as the horse clam, and 
the other as the goeduck. The horse clam 
is a staple with the Siwash Indians, but is 



22 



RECREA TION. 



not in great demand among the whites. 
The goeduck is a fine " bird," and to be 
prepared for the table it has to be cleaned 
and dressed as you would dress a chicken. 
This proposition rather floored the cook, 
who could find no head, wings, or feet to 
cut off; but as he expressed it, " He took 
the works out of 'em." 

The party from up the river soon re- 
turned with a nice string of Dolly Varden 
trout. But the laugh was on the engineer. 
We had heard of grangers having hayseed 
in their whiskers but a fisherman with sal- 
mon eggs in his hair was something new, 
and as his hand went quickly through his 
back hair there they were, hard and dry. He 
then remembered that having a bite on his 
line and another on his head, at the same 
time, he had attended to the latter with the 
hand that held his bait; but as he had 
landed his big trout he was let off. 

In going farther up the river the next 
day we were surprised to encounter a dense 
thicket of our beautiful state flower, the 
rhododendron, which, in its cultivated state 
is a mere shrub, but here they grow into 
trees 30 or 40 feet high, and 3 to 4 inches 
thick. 

Instead of going back on the deer trail we 
had used in going up, we attempted to fol- 
low the river down, and fish it to its mouth. 
We soon found this well nigh impossible, 
for it led through a narrow, rocky canon, 
making it almost impossible to obtain a 
foothold anywhere. The water was too 
deep and rapid to wade, so we were obliged 
to scramble along through the underbrush 
like rabbits. 

Wild berries were plentiful, and noon 
found us hungry. We made a meal of the 
fruit about us — sweet, trailing blackberries, 
mealy sallal berries, red, blue, and black 
huckleberries, and the big, yellow rasp- 
berry known as the salmon berry. No use 
of anyone starving to death in the woods 
of Washington. 

Deer and elk tracks were all about us, 
and the berry patches had been trampled 
down by bears; but we were a noisy crowd 
and so did not even get a glimpse of any- 
thing of the kind. 

After 8 hours of the hardest kind of 
tramping we came to the end of the gorge, 
too tired to fish, now that we had a chance, 
but willing to eat the good square meal that 
was soon ready. 

That afternoon we steamed down 10 miles 
along the shore and reached the Hamahama 
river. While not over 30 feet wide it was 
sufficiently deep to allow the boat to travel 
up it a mile or more, where we settled down 
again for a short stay. 

Up the river, where the water was fresh, 
the trout took the fly readily. They were 
of good size and mainly brook trout, al- 
though one rainbow was taken that 
weighed over 7 pounds. 

We found ruffed and blue grouse plenti- 



ful on the hill-side, and band-tailed pigeons 
scattered among the tall, dead trees of the 
bottoms. 

One day all hands went on an explora- 
tion trip up the river, that led into the very 
heart of the beautiful Olympics. Their 
green sides of cedar and fir rose grandly on 
either side, each summit being crowned by 
a glistening cap of eternal snow, the source 
of numberless little streams that coursed 
down their sides. Here we found the fish- 
ing excellent, but the roar of a cataract ahead 
enticed us farther up the stream, to some 
splendid falls that leaped from an overhang- 
ing shelf, 80 feet above us. In order to ob- 
tain a better view of the falls we felled a tree 
across the creek, which let us out to a 
bowlder in mid-stream. Here we sat, 
drinking in the wild beauty about us and 
imagining we were monarchs of all we sur- 
veyed, when down the mountain side came 
half a dozen pretty girls attired in bloomers 
and straw hats. They accepted our invita- 
tion to cross on our foot-log, and join us 
on the opposite bank. Their big brothers 
were soon lost to view, fishing round a 
bend in the river, and we had the dear 
creatures all to ourselves. We must have 
presented a sorry appearance, with our 
dirty clothes and unshaven faces, but their 
bangs had long lost their curl which 
evened things up, somewhat. In the course 
of conversation mention was made of Mt. 
Tacoma. " Oh, no; you mean Mt. Rai- 
nier," said the girl with dreamy eyes. That 
settled it. They were from Seattle. They 
had just arrived, bent on a trip similar to 
our own. 

" Wouldn't we please take their photo- 
graphs, with the falls for a background," 
they asked. 

" Certainly we would," and here is where 
the special artist, who had been kept in the 
background, came modestly forward. He 
labelled the plate—" Maids of the Mist; " 
but when the developer had washed over 
the plate for 10 minutes, in his dark room 
at home, and nothing came up he con- 
cluded something had been missed, sure 
enough. And now when he meets a mem- 
ber of our party he hears some remark 
about " dreamy eyes " and " forgetting to 
draw the slide." 

Our next camp was made near the head 
of the canal, on the Skokomish river. 

Being tired of trout we tried deep-sea 
fishing and soon found we could land 
flounders and rock-cod about as fast as we 
could pull in the 300 foot line. 

On the second day here the party went 
up the river, with guns and tackle — all but 
the cook, who stayed with the boat and put 
in his time making biscuits. He cast 40, 
enough for 2 meals, and put them away; but 
alas for the cook! When the hungry crowd 
got back the biscuits were all eaten at the 
first call, and quantities of grouse breasts 
and pink trout beside, to say nothing of 2 



A FEROX TROUT. 



2 3 



rounds each of coffee and a large number 
of " spuds." The cook had a lay off now, 
and the crew washed the dishes. Then all 
came ashore and got thoroughly warmed 
up around the camp fire, before turning in 
for the night. 

And so it went till the 10 short days had 
gone by and we headed the little launch for 
home. 

Owing to the special demand for bis- 
cuits and slap jacks the baking powder 



ran out; but we found an able substitute 
for it in the salt sea water, which seemed 
to contain all the necessary ingredients to 
make the dough rise, and the bread was 
good. 

On the return trip one of the crew had 
an attack of sea sickness and pleaded with 
the Captain to keep the boat from rolling 
so, but it was of no use and he did not re- 
cover till we put him on the Tacoma dock, 
and the cruise was at an end. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ROB'T WALSTROM. 



IMAGE CUT IN STONE.* 





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AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. F. WHITMORE. 



YOUNG BITTERN. 



* It is not known by whom this was cut. It was discovered about 3 years ago and was then black with age. It 
is located in a ravine between 2 bluffs on the western shore of Lake Pepin, 2 miles from Lake City, Minn. It 
may be the work of the Indians. It is life-size. 



A FEROX TROUT. 



GEORGE H. GORMAN. 



Aferoxtrout! Whiz! goes the reel. 
Ah, what a thrill of joy I feel, 
My faithful little bamboo bends 
Until it almost touches ends 
And reaches downward to my heel. 



In yonder bank he would conceal 
Himself in moss, but as I kneel 
And press him slightly, he ascends. 
I have him now, behold my friends, 
This lusty beauty, dainty meal, 
A ferox trout! 




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THE GROUNDS FOR A GREAT "ZOO." 



W. T. H. 



The final plans for the development of 
the New York Zoological Park have been 
completed, and on November 15th were 
presented by the Zoological Society to the 
Board of Parks, for formal approval. The 
amount of close study and hard labor be- 
stowed upon them, during the last 15 
months, by the director, the architects, the 
landscape gardener and the zoological ex- 
perts whose advice has been sought, has 
been great. The Zoological Society has 
spared neither time, labor nor money to 
make the park arrangement, and the plans 
for the buildings, as perfect as human 
knowledge and skill can make them. 

The society has had the good fortune to 
secure, as a site for the Zoological Park, 
a tract of land quite accessible to the mill- 
ions of Greater New York, and so well 
adapted to the various ends in view that it 
will prove a powerful factor in the achieve- 
ment of complete success. The possession 
of South Bronx Park (261 acres) will make 
it possible to produce, with a total outlay 
of about $500,000, a more perfect zoological 
park than could be developed on any other 
location in New York City for 4 times that 
sum. 

By way of illustration, consider the pro- 
posed buffalo range, a view of a part of 
which is shown herewith. Instead of a pen, 
such as is the limit in the ordinary 40 acre 
zoological garden, and instead of an area 
so large that it is impossible for visitors to 
see the animals, this range contains 20 
acres of fine, rolling meadow, with enough 
trees to afford abundant shade in hot 
weather, 2 extensive basins in which the 
grass is abundant and good, and a great 
ridge on which the ground is always dry. 
The accompanying view was taken from the 
end of the ridge, near the Southeast corner 
of the range, looking along its crest toward 
the famous Rocking Stone, which is seen 
in the distance toward the left. On the ex- 
treme right of the picture appears the 
" lower meadow," a beautiful glade lying 
along the Eastern side of the ridge, which 
in the spring will be cut off from the main 
area, and used as a breeding range, for the 
cows and calves of the herd. Around more 
than one-half of the entire buffalo range, 
visitors on the boundary walks will look 
oyer the top of the fence (of Page's steel 
wire), and it will be quite impossible for 
the animals to get too far away to be seen 
to good advantage. 

It would be an agreeable task to fill sev- 
eral pages of Recreation with facts setting 
forth the delightful adaptability of the open, 
hard-wood timber and sunny knolls for the 
herds belonging to the deer family; the 




A BIT OF FOREST IN THE ZOOLOGICAL 
PARK. 



25 



26 



RECREA TJOJST. 



splendid masses of pink granite to be util- 
ized in connection with the dens of the 
bears, wolves and foxes; the rugged es- 
carpment that will furnish a home for the 
mountain sheep and goat; the shady and 
secluded pond for the beaver; the ample 
lake for water birds, and the broad, grassy 
plateau that is to furnish trees, and rocks, 
and " town " sites for what is intended shall 
be a large collection of American rodents. 
But, like all good things, space in Recrea- 
tion is limited, and without an extensive 
series of pictures it is impossible to convey 
an adequate conception of the natural beau- 
ties of the zoological park grounds. 

The timber is simply perfect. Instead of 
second-growth, filled with underbrush, it 
is all virgin forest, composed mainly of 



giant chestnuts, oaks, beeches, hickories, 
elms, hemlocks, and coniferous trees, vary- 
ing from small red cedars to a huge white 
pine 120 feet in height. The accompanying 
illustration of a group of chestnut trees will 
at least suggest the general character of the 
forestry. From the number of trees that 
have been identified thus far, it seems cer- 
tain that the Zoological Park contains not 
less than 40 species; and perhaps 50 would 
be nearer the mark. 

The membership of the Zoological So- 
ciety is now 510, and the fund for buildings 
and collections is steadily growing. A later 
date it will be a pleasure to place before the 
readers of Recreation other illustrations 
of the Zoological Park grounds, and of the 
buildings for animals. 



THE UPPER MISTASSIXL 



W. F. J. M CORMICK. 



Mr. E. J. Meyer's article on the Lake St. 
John country, which appeared in Recrea- 
tion some time ago, interested me greatly, 
for I met him at his camp near the Fifth 
Falls of the Mistassini river last July, and 
spent some pleasant hours with him. At 
that time I was returning from an exten- 
sive trip to the headwaters of that river, 
having ascended it over 200 miles above 
Lake St. John. For many years I had 
heard of the " Grande Chute," near the 
source of the Mistassini, and had also heard 
the stories of the Indian and French voy- 
ageurs, concerning the origin of the river. 
Some of these men insisted it flowed di- 
rectly out of the great lake Mistassini. 
which I knew to be incorrect, as Mr. Low, 
of the Canadian Geographical Survey, has 
proven, beyond a doubt, that the waters of 
that mysterious lake find their way through 
Ruperts river, into James bay. Reports 
that reached me from time to time, during 
my 7 seasons at Lake St. John, told of 
enormous ouananiche, pike, dore and of 
" trout as big as salmon," to be found 
farther up than sportsmen ever go. All this 
excited my curiosity, and while fishing for 
trout on the preserve of the Triton Fish 
and Game Club, near Lake St. John, I per- 
fected my plans and left for Roberval some 
weeks sooner than I had originally in- 
tended, much to the disapproval of my 
father and my wife; but I finally persuaded 
them to accompany me. Arriving at Hotel 
Roberval, on the afternoon of June 14th, I 
found my 2 head canoemen — Alfred Lavoie 
(French) and Joseph Verrault (Algon- 
quin) — whom I had employed 6 summers, 
awaiting me on the platform. Two days 
were spent in repairing my canoes, buying 



a new one and making additions to our 
stock of provisions; then all was ready for 
the start. I experienced some difficulty in 
securing the four subordinate canoemen, 
as none of the voyagcurs of the lake care to 
undertake the hard portaging of mountains 
and ceaseless poling of the canoes up the 
heavy rapids above the tenth falls. How- 
ever, a half-breed, Henry Caligny by name, 
and 3 Frenchmen from Chambord, agreed 
to go. 

The morning of the 17th found us all on 
the little steamer " Le Colon," bound for 
the head of navigation on the river. After 
some 5 hours of bumping sawlogs and 
grinding our way through sand bars, we ar- 
rived at the landing of the Trappist Mon- 
astery, near the first falls. A hurried lunch 
was taken here, when, after a short walk 
around the fall, the canoes were laden and 
our trip commenced. This so called " fall," 
is merely a heavy rapid in a narrow gorge. 
Not 200 yards from where the canoes are 
launched, across a foam flecked pool, is the 
second fall, this being a sheer drop of 15 
feet and affording good ouananiche fishing. 
The portage here is very short and steep. 
Two miles of canoeing in still water 
brought us to the third fall, merely a short 
rapid and a still shorter portage. The 
fourth fall is a shallow cascade, about 24 of 
a mile from the preceding. 

While here in 1802, accompanied by 2 
reckless canoemen I ran the fourth and 
first falls. At the head of this portage the 
canoes are launched near a small island and 
very close to the brink of the cascade. 
Only a short bend in the river separates the 
fourth and fifth falls. This is the favorite 
camp site for parties visiting this river, in 



THE UPPER MISTASSINI. 



27 



quest of ouananiche. The stream is prob- 
ably 800 yards in width, with a small island 
near the right bank that divides it into 2 
falls. The left, or main fall, has a vertical 
drop of 35 feet, while the smaller channel to 
the right is broken and slanting, forming a 
natural fishway to the river above. Our 
camp was made in the usual place, on the 
island dividing the falls. While the men 
were busy with the tents, I prepared my 
tackle, consisting of a 10 ounce lancewood 
fly-rod, a quadruple multiplying reel, with 
200 feet of enamelled line and a cast of a 
Silver Doctor, dropper, and Brown hackle, 
stretcher. I made my way to the foot of 
the smaller fall and cast in an eddy — that I 
knew from previous experience was usually 
good for one or 2 ouananiche. Much to 
my delight, the brown hackle disappeared 
at once and the heavy strain that came in 
response to my strike told me I had no 
small game to contend with. But soon my 
exultation began to fade and finally turned 
to disgust as the mottled sides of a 10 
pound pike (Esox lucius) revealed them- 
selves. My father, casting a short distance 
from me, was soon fast to 2 medium sized 
ouananiche, and after ridding myself of my 
obnoxious victim, I assisted him to land 
them. His verdict was, 

" Enough for supper, shall we stop?" 

To which I agreed; and reeling up, we 
went to camp and revelled in the luxury of 
mosquito oil and smoke. The mosquito 
and the black-fly are the curse of the Cana- 
dian bush, in early summer; but the sports- 
man can live and even enjoy himself if he 
has a tight tent and plenty of " medicine." 
My experience has been very bad with 
most of the manufactured fly-repellants, so 
I use equal parts of oil of tar, oil penny- 
royal, and pure vaseline, scented with cit- 
ronella. This is thoroughly effectual and 
pleasant to use. 

Father has been in love with the fifth fall 
ever since our first visit, in '92, and to 
please him we remained there 3 days be- 
fore pushing on up the river. He suc- 
ceeded in keeping the table supplied with 
ouananiche, while my wife and I amused 
ourselves by trolling for the large wall- 
eyes pike, or dore (Stizostedion vitreum), 
which I prefer to the ouananiche, for the 
table. 

The portage around the fifth fall and the 
rapid above, uses up the best part of a mile 
and is quite rough. Then there is a 
stretch of calm water; then a narrow, 
rough rapid that must be portaged. Only 
a short distance above come 4 cascades, in 
quick succession, and as many short port- 
ages. 

Lunch was made at the sixth oortage at 
the foot of what is called the " short dead- 
water," some 12 miles in length and in 
places quite 2 miles wide. We camped at 
the eighth fall, on a sandy beach. This is a 
peculiar cataract, being fully a half mile 



wide and resembling a series of broad 
steps. The river descends at this point 
about 60 feet in 500 yards. 

Here we made a stay of 2 days, for the 
purpose of making paddles and poles, soon 
to be used in the ascent of the heavy rapid 
above the tenth fall. These poles are from 
12 to 15 feet long, of black spruce, and 
fitted into steel points, to prevent slipping 
on the recks. While at this camp we took 
many ouananiche, releasing all those not 
needed for food. My father also took a 2A 
pound pike. A small creek, swarming with 
minnows, was close by our camp and a few 
dips of the landing net always secured an 
abundance of live bait, much relished by 
pike and dore, while one or 2 ouananiche 
were caught with them. 

Above this portage, which is half a mile 
long and very steep, are 2 good sized falls, 
and one heavy rapid that necessitates the 
first use of the poles. Imagine yourself in 
an 18 foot birch canoe, heavily laden, with 
2 brawny voyageurs standing erect in bow 
and stern, straining every muscle in the ef- 
fort to pass a dangerous rock in the centre 
of a river as large as the Missouri at Kan- 
sas City, pouring its violent floods about 
the frail fabric and lashing itself into spray 
against the bowlders — seemingly doing its 
best to ingulf you, as if displeased at the 
temerity of man in attempting to conquer 
it. No wonder the canoemen use the best 
of wood, and carefully test their poles! 
The dreadful consequences of breaking one 
can be too easily foreseen. 

Sometimes the current exceeds the 
strength of the men; and after a motionless 
moment, that seems hours, the canoe grad- 
ually creeps backward, an inch at a time, 
regardless of the efforts of the men. This 
is the moment of greatest danger. In an 
instant the poles are thrown inboard — fre- 
quently striking the sportsman's head — ■ 
and, under the stroke of paddles, the canoe 
whirls rapidly around and descends with al- 
most lightning speed to the nearest eddy, 
where breath is taken before again making 
the attempt. Imagine all this, if you can, 
with huge rocky cliffs and mountains in 
the background, clad in the sombre green 
of spruce and fir, with no sign of life among 
them! Then you may have a faint idea of 
the difficulties of the ascent of the upper 
Mistassini. 

About an hour's paddle from this rapid 
the mouth of the Wassiemiska river is 
reached. This is a short stream, having 2 
branches, one rising in Lake au Jeaune 
(commonly called Lac a Jim), and the 
other in Lake Otter, otherwise known as 
Netsegami. some 50 miles from its conflu- 
ence with the Mistassini. Though so short, 
it is a rapid river, having- no less than 30 
falls and cascades in the Netsegami branch. 

Through this stream lies the favorite 
route for sportsmen who ascend the Ashu- 
apmouchouan river (pronounced Sam- 




FIFTH FALLS, MISTASSINI RIVER, CANADA. LITTLE FALL AND OUANANICHE POOL. 
From a photograph kindly loaned by Eugene McCarthy. 



mouch-o-an), and return by Lac a Jim and 
the Mistassini — a popular, but to me, an 
uninteresting trip. 

From the mouth of the Wassiemiska the 
tenth fall can be plainly seen, with a long, 
flume-like rapid extending half a mile 
above it. Down this flume the river 
rushes with great force and hurls itself over 
the last drop, of about 20 feet, into a deep, 
foamy pool, a favorite stopping place for 
pike, dore and ouananiche. On the right 
side of the fall, is a narrow channel, 
broken into short cascades, up which the 
fish can be seen leaping, on their journey 
up the river. Strange that every fall — 
otherwise impassible, has a natural fish- 
way! On our return we spent some days at 
this point and tested the fishing thor- 
oughly. 

After crossing the portage a stretch of 
calm water is reached that requires some 2 
hours to pass. Then there is a heavy rapid, 
scarcely 50 feet wide, with perpendicular 
cliffs on each side rising to a height of 200 
feet. No chance for a portage and too deep 
for the poles. The " tump line " (a 75 foot 
manilla rope), is uncoiled and each canoe is 
slowly " warped " up to the crest of the 
rapid. No more portages after this, until 
the " Grande Portage " is reached, some 
days' journey farther North. 

That evening we camped on a narrow 
sand bar, in the centre of the stream, which 
is very shallow and wide for some distance 
above the " Cransserrie," as the narrow 



rapid is termed. The next morning at sun- 
rise (that being about 3.30 in this high lat- 
itude), camp was broken and we were soon 
under way. By noon the largest tributary 
was reached — the River Samoquan, which 
is fully as large as the Mistassini and has 
its source in a large, unknown lake near 
the watershed between the Ungava river 
and the St. Lawrence. This river and lake 
are probably responsible for the erroneous 
belief, so long current, that the Mistassini 
river was the outlet of the lake of that 
name; whereas the Samoquan flows from 
Northeast to Southwest, and the Mistassini 
from North to South; while the Lake Mis- 
tassini lies Northwest from the junction of 
the 2 streams. The rivers meet in an 
angry rush of waters, both being rapid and 
narrowly confined in rocky gorges, where 
the conflicting currents cause a dangerous 
whirlpool almost as perilous as the re- 
nowned one at Isle Maligne, in the Grand 
Decharge of Lake St. John. 

During the preparation of lunch here, I 
cast in the Samoquan several times without 
result. Then, crossing the narrow point to 
the Mistassini, I took 2 fine ouananiche, on 
a Jock Scot salmon fly. 

A short digression here will not be 
amiss. Some of the voyageurs of Lake St. 
John declare there are no ouananiche above 
the tenth fall of this river. This is because 
they do not care to undertake the labor re- 
quired to pole up the rapids; and as no 
sportsmen had ever been above the Was- 



28 




FIFTH FALLS, MISTASSINI RIVER, CANADA. MAIN FALL. 
From a photograph kindly loaned by Eugene McCarthy. 



siemiska before my trip, there was no one 
to contradict them. I am sorry to say there 
are some very unreliable men at Lake St. 
John, who make a practice of living off the 
sportsman with as little work as possible. 
They also take pleasure in misleading him 
at every opportunity. Happily, however, 
these constitute a small minority, for at no 
resort in Canada are there so many honest, 
hard working men as at Lake St. John. 

My head man is perfection. Short in 
stature, muscular, and quick as a marten, 
he combines scrupulous cleanliness with an 
excellent knowledge of canoeing and cook- 
ing. He has served 13 years between Lake 
Temiscamingue (the source of the Ottawa 
river), and Moose Fort, on James bay, 
canoeing furs in summer and driving dog 
teams in winter, for the Hudson Bay Com- 
pany. Besides his native tongue, he speaks 
excellent English and several Indian dia- 
lects. Having been in my employ several 
years, I doubt if he could be secured by 
anyone else, or I should take pleasure in 
recommending him to the readers of Rec- 
reation. 

For 6 days after passing the Samoquan 
the poling is uninterrupted except by rest- 
ing spells for the men, every half hour. 
The river pours rapidly, but noiselessly, be- 
tween high mountains covered with a thick 
second growth of pine and spruce, this 
country having been devastated by the 
great fire of 1873, that worked such havoc 
through this part of Labrador. Occasion- 
ally a bowlder cuts its surface, causing a 
slight ripple, but as a rule it is a strong re- 
minder of Bayard Taylor's description of 
the Saguenay: " A river of desolation and 
death." 

Silently and swiftly it moves, a river of 
oil, as gentle as an Adirondack pond, to all 
appearances; but once in your canoe the 
illusion is dispelled, for the united strength 



of 2 men can hardly force the light craft 
against it. The centre is of unknown 
depth; and even near the shore the poles 
sometimes fail to touch bottom, and the 
" tump line " is used. The force of the cur- 
rent is plainly shown by the many abrasions 
of the bark of trees 20 feet, or more, above 
the canoe, caused by drifting ice in the 
spring freshets. 

These far Northern rivers have a rise of 
10 to 40 feet, caused by the sudden melting 
of the snow on the adjacent mountains and 
by the formation of immense ice gorges at 
the falls. 

In this part of the river we suffered 
greatly from the mosquitoes, which at- 
tacked us at every stop; and all agreed 
they were far worse than any we had en- 
countered in the mangrove swamps of 
Florida. 

However, there must be an end to all 
things, and on the afternoon of the sixth 
day, after passing the Samoquan, when we 
entered the " Great Calm," the breeze 
speedily ridded us of the pests. This so- 
called " calm " is merely a lake-like expan- 
sion of the river, resembling the short, 
dead water below the eighth fall, but many 
times larger. It is fully 30 miles long and 
from 2 to 6 miles in width, very shallow, 
with many bushy islands. I took the lib- 
erty of naming it Annabel's Lake, in honor 
of my wife, she being the first white woman 
to visit it. 

It is well to state here, that, with the ex- 
ception of a Mr. Cummings, of Lake St. 
John, who made 2 fur trading trips here, in 
1884, our party were the first white persons 
to reach beyond the Samoquan. This lake 
is surrounded by a comparatively level plain 
stretching back 2 miles or more from the 
shores to abrupt cliffs of naked rock that 
rise to a height of 1,000 feet. 

The rock formation here differs greatly 



29 




CAMP FIFTH FALLS, MISTASSINI RIVER, CANADA. 

From a photograph kindly loaned by Eugene McCarthy. 



from that of Lake St. John — this being of 
unmistakable igneous origin, while that 
of the Lake St. John is mainly sedimentary 
deposit, rich in the remains of small mol- 
lusca and crustaceans. 

This basin was undoubtedly the crater 
of an enormous volcano, now partially 
filled by glacial drift. Everywhere on the 
mountains can be seen the erosions and 
rounded bowlders that identify the glacial 
epoch. At one camp I found some beauti- 
ful tourmaline crystals, but they were un- 
fortunately forgotten in our departure. 

Almost all the points and islands have 
been used many times as hunting camps, 
by the Montagnais Indians, and are fantas- 
tically ornamented with bear, beaver, mar- 
ten, fox and other skulls, mounted on high 
poles. This curious custom arises from a 
desire to propitiate the good spirit of the 
animals. According to the Montagnais' 
belief, each species has both a good and a 
bad spirit, and is also possessed of a cer- 
tain amount of immortality. These people 
say also the putting up of the skulls pre- 
vents the dogs feeding on them. They say, 
" If dog eat beaver head, no catch more 
beaver, never." Too bad they do not take 
the same precaution in regard to their own 
dead! 

Near the Grande Portage we passed sev- 
eral shallow graves, one of which had been 
badly torn by bears and carcajoux, the lat- 
ter being a vicious brute that I know no 
English name for.* On making inquiries 
of my Indians I learned that these graves 
had contained the bodies of 3 men and 2 
women of their tribe, who had died of star- 
vation, the previous winter. No sympathy 
was manifested by my men except a guttural 
grunt and an oath or two. Such is the 



* This is the wolverine. — Editor. 



reverence in which death is held by these 
squalid children of the bleak Northland. 

At none of the stops we made on the lake, 
did we take any ouananiche, the water be- 
ing too shallow and quiet for fly fishing. 
However, dore and pike were abundant, 
though smaller than those taken above. 

Near the upper end of the lake a large 
stream enters it from the West, called the 
River Tuladi — (meaning salmon -trout), 
that rises in several small ponds among the 
mountains. We did not enter it, but were 
told by the Indians there were some beau- 
tiful falls near the source, and good trout 
fishing above them. • Of course the Mistas- 
sini contains no trout, as the pike destroy all 
that enter it. Three days were occupied in 
leisurely traversing the lake, and the 
change from the laborious poling of the 
preceding week was most welcome. 

At the upper end, or " head," the river 
flows between large sand hills, with a 
strong current, but permitting the use of 
paddles. Our camp, on the evening of July 
3d, was made on a rocky bluff, in a thicket 
of small birches. Numerous signs of bear, 
beaver and otter were found here. On the 
morning of the Fourth, the water in our 
pail was covered by a thin crust of ice. That 
afternoon we reached the foot of the great 
rapids, which extend a distance of 50 or 60 
miles. Though there is not so great a 
volume of water here as in the Peribonca 
river, or the Grande Decharge, these rapids 
are the wildest stretch I ever canoed on, 
excepting, of course, the Batiscan river, in 
the preserve of the Triton Club. 

For several days we did not test the fish- 
ing, but I feel sure many fine ouananiche 
could be taken in the numerous eddies and 
pools we passed. About midway of the 
rapids is the mouth of a small stream which 
I named River Castor, from the number of 
beaver huts and dams on it. 



3° 



THE UPPER MISTASSINI. 



3i 



Opposite there is a winter trail leading to 
the Lake Ashuapmouchouan (the source of 
the main branch of the river of that name), 
some 60 miles to the West. This is the 
route the Indians use when crossing from 
Lake Mistassini to the Mistassini river and 
is the shortest distance (200 miles) between 
the lake and river. Six uneventful days 
were spent in these rapids and at 3 o'clock 
on the afternoon of the seventh we camped 
at the lower end of the Grande Portage, a 
tired but thankful party. 

This portage is around a very rough 
rapid that cannot be canoed on account of 
some terrible whirlpools. One bad hill at 
the start, then the remaining 3 miles are 
over a level barren, deeply carpeted with 
moss and small clumps of spruces. We 
crossed very early >in the morning and the 
hoar frost, on the spider webs in the 
spruces, was a beautiful sight. Many fresh 
bear tracks, in the moss, wrought the Ind- 
ians up to a high state of excitement, and 
they begged me to stop for a few days' 
hunt; but as I had no desire to carry any 
bear grease among our provisions, I re- 
fused and contended them by saying they 
could hunt all the bear they wanted when 
we went on our caribou hunt, on the Batis- 
can, in autumn. 

At the end of the portage, there is a 
stretch of calm water, perhaps 10 miles 
long, where we tried the trolling lines and 
took some fine pike and one ouananiche. 
The last portage is just above this calm, 
the landing place being in a terrible rapid. 
The " sea " here is fully as high as that on 
the Gervais rapid, in Saguenay. I debarked 
and walked around the rocks, while my 
wife refused to get out, saying it was great 
sport. 

This portage is only about a mile in 
length, but a very steep, sandy hill, about 
200 feet high, has to be ascended and it 
taxed our breathing powers to the utmost. 
Near the upper end of the portage the river 
falls 100 feet in as many rods, the water 
going at lightning speed through a natural 
flume in the rock. So rapid is the descent 
that the water in the flume is but 3 feet 
deep. We named this the " Devil's Slide." 

From the head of the " slide " the river is 
narrow and quiet for about a mile. Then 
it suddenly expands — forming a circular 
basin 2 miles in diameter and surrounded 
by abrupt mountains. Rounding a point, 
jutting out from the East side, we suddenly 
came in sight of one of the most magnifi- 
cent cataracts it ever falls to the lot of man 
to see. The river seems to drop out of the 
sky, in 3 vertical falls; the first semicircular 
in shape, and not more than 20 feet wide; 
the second wider and white as milk, when, 
after striking a narrow ledge, a third leap 
of fully 300 feet is taken, to the boiling pool 
below. We estimated the total descent to 
be in the neighborhood of 700 feet, and the 
volume of water — the river was very low at 



that time — as great as that of the Delaware 
river, below Trenton, N. J. 

Camp was made on a strip of sandy 
beach, directly opposite the fall. That 
night we were treated to a peculiar sight, 
consisting of a kind of rainbow formed by 
the aurora borealis in the spray of the fall. 
The soft light and weird, ever changing 
forms in the mist, made a picture that will 
never be forgotten. 

While camp was being prepared a can- 
vas-back duck, with a brood of fledglings, 
came near and, after counting the young, 
my father said: 

" Eleven. Too bad she did not have an 
even dozen." 

However, she was not to blame, as the 
following will show. Needing some pike 
for supper, my father trolled about the 
shores, near camp, and took several, one 
having a large lump in its stomach that 
subsequently proved to be the twelfth 
duckling. We had become used to finding 
small wood-rats and frogs in pike, but a 
canvas-back duck surprised us. 

That evening we made a trial for ouan- 
aniche, near the foot of the fall. I took one 
dore, but saw numbers of ouananiche jump- 
ing, near by. These foolish fish are so ab- 
sorbed in a desire to go up stream, that 
they leap, time after time, into the face of 
this insurmountable cataract, only to be 
dashed back to the rocks below. 

Father was more successful for he took 2 
large ouananiche on a cast of " Butcher " 
and " Silver Doctor " salmon flies. 

The next morning, accompanied by the 
Indian, Henry, I climbed the mountain and 
discovered the source of the river, about 
10 miles above the fall. Here we found 
many small lakes and streams, while as far 
as the eye could reach there could be seen 
a tamarack and cedar swamp, with a net- 
work of creeks running through it. The 
objective point of our trip reached, we de- 
voted one more day to the ouananiche, tak- 
ing a dozen small ones — averaging 2Y2 
pounds — and then started homeward. 

The return trip was broken by but one 
incident. Leaving the fall at 6 in the morn- 
ing we crossed the 2 portages and began 
the descent of the long rapid, at noon. 
Near the worst place in the rapid there is a 
long, gravelly point, extending out to the 
centre of the stream, and just as we came 
abreast of it, a large black bear walked out 
on it and stood looking at us with an in- 
quisitive gaze. I let fly at him with a .45- 
125 express rifle, but the motion of the 
canoe caused me to over-shoot, and with a 
few sniffs in the air he turned and entered 
the bush. Although this was the only bear 
we actually saw, we had heard them, and 
had seen fresh tracks at almost every camp. 
I do not know of a place in Canada that 
would afford better sport for the bear 
hunter than this river and its tributaries. 

Late that evening we camped at Trout 



3 2 



RECREA TION. 



river, having passed, in 12 hours, the same 
distance it had taken us nearly 8 days to 
cover, when going up. Under way at 5 the 
next morning, we passed Annabel's lake 
quickly and camped on a small island be- 
low it early in the afternoon. The next 
morning we ran the rapids, without event, 
and were at the River Samoquan by noon. 
After a hurried lunch paddles were again 
dipped and with the slight mishap of ship- 
ping a wave over the baggage canoe, while 
descending the " Cransserrie," we arrived 
at the foot of the tenth fall at 5 in the after- 
noon. 

Some idea of the force and rapidity of the 
current can be gained when it is remem- 
bered that it took us 17 days to reach the 
great fall, from this point, while the return 
trip occupied but 3. A comfortable camp 
was made here, as we intended to remain 
several days and to send 3 of the men down 
to the Trappist Monastery for provisions; 
then to pole up the Wassiemiska and return 
to Roberval by way of Lac a Jim and the 
Ashuapmouchouan river. Here we took 
numbers of ouananiche, pike and dore with 
the fly and live bait; the fly being the most 
killing. I will ask your readers if they do 
not regard it as unusual to take the dore, 
or wall-eyed pike on the artificial fly. It 
certainly surprised me. The men returned 
in 3 days laden with pork, beans, flour and 
tobacco, all obtained from the good Fath- 
ers, for a round sum in gold. 

The next morning Henry and I investi- 
gated the rapids of the Wassiemiska, but 
found the water too low for our heavily 
laden canoes, so we were forced to aban- 
don our trip to Lac a Jim. The run down 
to the fourth fall was made in about 7 hours 
and many pools were tried with poor re- 
sults. At the island of the fifth fall, Mr. E. 
J. Meyers and wife were camped, having as 
neighbors Mr. E. T. D. Chambers, of Que- 
bec, author of " The Ouananiche, and its 
Canadian Environment," and Colonel Hag- 
gard, of England. All reported good sport. 

Our last camp was made at the fourth fall, 
where we took many fine ouananiche. 
Having a strong current in our favor, we 
did not wait for the steamboat, but paddled 
the whole distance to Pointe Bleue Reser- 



vation, near Roberval, where we arrived at 
3 o'clock on the afternoon of July 25th. 

Summing up, I will say that while we had 
splendid fishing and enjoyed ourselves tc 
the utmost, I do not think I would care tc 
take the trip again. I advise all sportsmen 
in quest of ouananiche to ascend the Peri- 
bonca river, as far as Lake Tchitagama. 
Here they will find more beautiful scenery 
and better fishing, besides being only 4 days 
from Roberval. 

In conclusion, I will say a few words 
about ouananiche fishing as I have found 
it, for 7 seasons. Use good heavy leaders, 
not more than 5 feet long; a multiplying 
or automatic reel, carrying no less than 70 
yards of enamelled silk line, and a servic- 
able, solid wood rod, not more than 10 
ounces in weight. I consider the average 
split bamboo rod an abomination. 

Let your flies be tied to reinforced snells, 
or better still, short loops of twisted gut. 
Numbers 2 to 6 hooks are the correct sizes; 
and it is well to include some double 
hooked salmon flies, on No. 4 hooks. The 
flies I have found best I give in order: Sal- 
mon Flies — Silver Doctor, Jock Scott, 
Butcher, Durham Ranger, Dusty Miller, 
Prince William of Orange, Black June; 
Trout Flies — Professor, Brown Hackle — 
red body, Hamlin, Ferguson, Grey Drake, 
Grizzly King, Seth Green, Little Big Horn. 

Once in the Ashuapmouchouan river, I 
took an ouananiche with a Scarlet Ibis, but 
have never raised one to it since. Parma- 
chenee Belle, though the best trout fly in 
the world, seems to frighten ouananiche. 

Use but 2 flies and let them be submerged 
2 or 3 inches, part of the time. I never saw 
and never expect to see an ouananiche take 
a fly on the surface. Once at Isle Maligne 
one vaulted into my canoe, and played sad 
havoc with my open tackle box; but I do 
not think the flies in it attracted him. I ad- 
vise to strike on the slightest touch. You 
won't see one fish in 50, when they rise. In 
playing them be careful to give no slack 
line. 

I refer those desiring further instruction, 
to that excellent pamphlet, " The Leaping 
Ouananiche," by Eugene McCarthy, Syra- 
cuse, New York. 



" They say if you look a wild animal 
squarely in the eye with a steady, concen- 
trated gaze, it will be cowed, and will flee." 

"Well, I couldn't do it; but my wife 
could. She has routed me that way, many 
a time." 



ELKLAND. 

V. 

PUSS AND THE BEAR. 

ERNEST SETON THOMPSON. 



An interesting episode was reported to 
me the other day, from the Fountain Ho- 
tel. I am not sure it is true; but it is so 
good I wish to believe it, and so will give 
it pretty much as I heard it, regretting my 






i 



/ 



i 




"I WONDER WHOSE BIG YALLER DOG 
THAT IS?" 

inability to translate it into standard Eng- 
lish without losing much of its true senti- 
ment.* 




HANDS UP!" SCREAMED THE KITTEN. 



They have a new cat at the Fountain 
hotel this year, and this cat, herself a little 
chit of a kitten, brought forth her first 
brood of kits — of absolutely unparalleled 

* Since writing the above I have met 3 bronzed moun- 
tain men who are willing to vouch for the story and who 
are good revolver shots. 




" YOWL— SLAP— YEOW-W-W ! " 

beauty, she believed, and great Caesar, how 
proud and happy she was! 

Before many days a monster cinnamon 
bear loomed up against the distant land- 
scape and darkened the sky with his vast, 




"BAH-AH-AH !" 

heaving bulk as he came toward the kitch- 
en, as in days of yore. 

Kitty was with her kits; but when this 
eclipse of the back veranda took place she 
went out to see, and lo! the hugest, yaller- 
est dog she had ever seen. To fly in terror 
was her first thought; but "my kitties" 
was her second; so, standing her highest 
and trying to look like a porcupine, she 
screamed, in excellent Wyomese, 

" You awkward, hulking, club-footed, 
overgrown, bobtailed, yaller cur, you come 
within 3 jumps of this shack and your 
name is Dennis." 

The bear slacked up a bit and grumbled 
something about a " miserable, spike-tailed 



33 



34 



RECREA TJON. 



skunk," which after all was not a bad de- 
scription of the little cat. 

"Hands up" screamed the kitten; ad- 
vancing one hop, and redeeming herself 
from the reproach of " spiketailed." 

" I wont," growled the bear; but he must 
have had a female disposition, for he did. 
He held up his paws and reared on his ul- 
timatum till his head grew small in per- 
spective. Then he growled something 
about being " the ruler of the hull Rock- 
ies; that he was there for swill and swill 
he would have." 

The cat looked so small, down below, 
that the old cinnamon took fresh courage, 
dropped again on all fours and moved 
swill-ward. 

" Stop! " shrieked the now desperate 
kitten. 

" I want my swill," growled Cinnamo- 
neus. 

" Fizz — yowl — yap," and the naughty 
kitten landed on his big bald nose. She 
had 32 knives in her mouth and 18 fish 
hooks in her toes and they all worked by 
electricity. 

And the bear? Well he upped and ran; 
and you can't blame him. I'd a done the 
same thing myself. But pussy was out for 
blood. She could move faster than he 
could and she plied her hooks and knives 
like a little demon. 

The ruler of the mountains tried his fast- 



est gait, but it didn't seem to help out 
much; so, in desperation, he climbed the 
nearest tree, while pussy played hop scotch 
on his rear guard. 

The bear went high 
enough up to be safe. 
Then glared down and 
made nasty remarks 
about the little cat. 
She walked around the 
base of the tree; dared 
him to come down and 
asked him how he liked 
his swill? 
Would he like 
it sent up to his 
room, or would 
he wait till he 
was big enough 
to come down 
and get it. She 
" rubbed it into 
him " thus, for 
an hour or so, 
till the boss of 
the hotel, con- 
sidering the af- 
fair was degen- 
erating into a 
case of bullying, 

n ^J °^rr ^ . "WILL YOU COME DOWN AND GET 
called Oil tllS YOUR SWILL, OR WILL YOU HAVE 

Ca t. it SENT UP TO YOUR ROOM ? " 




THE CHIEF COOK. 



W. H. NELSON. 



Say, Jim, ye know Coquiner? 

Well, hev ye ever seen er 
Feller what's so derned, all-fired queer? 

I hev knowed him in the mountings, 

Camped with him beside the fountings, 
And have swapped tabacker with him for 
more'n 30 year. 



He kin stop a rushin' grizzly — 
By the bones of Billy Chizley! — 

Jist as cool as any duck ye ever met, 
He kin drop an old buck quicker, 
Coax a trout to come out slicker, 

Than ary other feller; which the same I'm 
here to bet. 



Kin he cook? Well, I'm a smilin'! 

And for roastin', bakin', brilin', 
He'll lick the boots off that big feller in 
Noo York; 

He's some on chops or brisket. 

He kin beat the Dutch at biscuit, 
And he'll waller all creation on a mess of 
r - roasted pork. 



Now, ther's lots o' cooks hez boasted 
Which the pork that they hez roasted 
Wuz sweeter than fresh honey from the 
hive; 
But the dish they sweat preparin' 
Wuz from hog as dead as herrin' 
While this Coquiner feller now'-days roasts 
his hogs alive. 

He hez got a combination 
Range which he calls Recreation, 
Which the same he fires up monthly with 
fresh logs, 
And the way he roasts the grunters 
(Which they calls theirselves great 
hunters), 
Is a beautiful invention in the way of roast- 
in' hogs. 

The fish-hogs must be feelin' 
Kinder scaly, and like squeelin', 
And the game-hogs they are quiet-like, this 
fall; 
But the bristles, they are scorchin' 
For Coquiner, he's a watchin' 
And he'll roast them to perfection, skin and 
all. 



THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE. 



B. J. R. 



The boys are telling a good story of 2 
travelling men, who visited a small town 
in Northeastern Arkansas. Knowing that 
good fishing could be found near town they 
arranged for a camping trip. They were 
joined by 2 local merchants and the quar- 
tette began to hustle for a camp outfit. 

They succeeded in getting a farm wagon, 
some extra wagon sheets, some pots and 
skillets and a box of grub. On the sug- 
gestion of one of the merchants they em- 
ployed a colored man who answered to the 
name of Eiph, who was recommended as 
being faithful, industrious, an all round 
handy man, and a fair camp cook. 

At the break of day the party pulled out, 
feeling as frisky and as jolly as a bunch of 
school-boys out for a holiday. 

Arkansas roads are, as a rule, a serious 
matter. Many a poor wayfarer has had his 
shoulder blades shaken loose while driv- 
ing over them, but these drummers were 
used to hard knocks and their victims, the 
native merchants, were hardened beyond all 
possibility of injury. A man who can sit on 
a dry goods box and let a St. Louis drum- 
mer talk to him 3 hours, without fainting, 
can stand anything. 

So, the old farm wagon pounded merrily 
along, over the corduroy, and the passen- 
gers kept shouting into one another's ears, 
telling how glad they would be when they 
reached the river. And sure enough they 
finally reached it. On arriving there they 
set up camp and were soon enjoying a 
breakfast of " briled " bacon, hot coffee, 
etc., which Eiph had prepared. The drive 
had given them an appetite that any hobo 
might envy. They ate everythingun sight 
and sighed for more; but Eiph told £hem 
there was no more and they must hustle for 
grub for dinner or go home hungrier than 
when they came out. 

The next thing was bait. Spoons, flies, 
phantom minnows, etc., the drummers had, 
in plenty, but not a one with them; hence 
live minnows were the only recourse. 
There was a minnow seine in the outfit and 
so the party set out for a bayou to catch 
minnows. They were scarce, however, and 
hard to get; but by scraping the creek up 
and down and crosswise, a dozen times, 
they managed to fill their pail. 

In making a draw it was discovered that 
they had captured a good sized soft shell 
turtle. One of the drummers said they 
were at least sure of a good dinner. He 
admitted these soft-shelled turtles, or, as 
most people termed them, these mud-tur- 
tles, were not the daintiest morsel in the 
world. For instance, he said, he would 



rather have a brook trout, or a red snap- 
per, or even a canvasback duck; but that 
when the bacon was all gone and the other 
grub getting shy a soft shell was a mighty 
good thing to fall back on. The resc 
agreed and Eiph was told to pick up the 
turtle and lead out for camp. 

Now Eiph was superstitious and had 
never heard of any one's eating a turtle. 
He therefore remonstrated, mildly, against 
such a course. 

" Boss foh de Lawd sake you ain't gwine 
foh to eat dat ting! I wouldn't tase a bite 
o' dat ar' tuhtle fo de whole worl. Sho you 
dosn't mean dat. You jess tryin' to fool dis 
old nigga. You wants me to toat dat ting 
up to camp? Good Lawd! " 

It required the positive command of the 
Southerner, which is second nature with 
them in dealing with the negro, to induce 
Eiph. to shoulder the turtle and lead off. 

As the party strode silently up the hill, 
Eiph in advance with the turtle on his back, 
one of the drummers following in his 
tracks and the rest bringing up the rear in 
Indian file, Eiph's agitation and supersti- 
tious awe were apparent. His mutterings 
were such as to indicate plainly that he re- 
garded the whole scheme as uncanny. 

Now it chanced that the drummer who 
was following next after Eiph was an ama- 
teur ventriloquist of no mean ability. This 
was well known by all the party except 
Eiph, who was as ignorant of ventriloquism 
as of turtle soup. 

The ventriloquist took in the situation, 
and as Eiph was plodding along with the 
turtle on his back, the picture of unwilling 
subordination, the silence was suddenly 
broken by a weird voice, apparently com- 
ing from the turtle, saying plaintively: 

" What are you going to do with me, 
Eiph?" 

As the novelists say, Eiph " started, vis- 
ibly." His eyes grew larger. His breath- 
ing was quicker and his step unsteady; yet 
through force of his habit of obedience he 
still trudged along with the turtle on his 
back. 

After the lapse of a few minutes the 
turtle again said, pleadingly: 

" What are you going to do with me, 
Eiph?" 

By this time Eiph's agitation was piti- 
able. 

His eyes were rolling wildly as he looked 
b,ack over first one shoulder and then the 
other, his nether lip hanging down like a 
saddle skirt, and the perspiration flowing 
from his face in drops as big as peas. His 
steps were growing decidedly unsteady 



25 




I'SE GWINE TO DRAP YOU RIGHT HEAH ! " 



when the voice from the turtle appealingly 

asked, again, 

" Eiph, what are you going to do with 

me? " 

" Fse gwine to drap you right heah! " 
The words were bellowed, rather than 



spoken, and the action was suited to the 
word. 

He " drapped " the turtle, lit out through 
the brush, in the direction of the village, 
and the place which had known him for an 
hour past, knew him no more. 



THE DOCTOR'S BUFFALO HUNT. 



CAPT. J. H. SANDS, U. S. A. 



Old Fort Hays, Kansas, in 1872 was con- 
sidered a frontier post; and in truth it was, 
for Indians were numerous, and mischiev- 
ous, while the prairies abounded with herds 
of buffalo and other game. 

It was during these times that many not- 
ables from the Old Country, often a prince 
or a duke, would come to America to hunt 
buffalo. They would notify the war depart- 
ment of their wish, and secure letters of in- 



troduction to the commanding officer at 
Hays, who would see to it that they had 
hunting to their hearts' content. They were 
usually excellent gentlemen, but poor 
equestrians, and many narrow escapes they 
had — not always from Indians or enraged 
buffalo bulls, but in falling from their horses 
in mad gallops with those experienced 
in the sport. On one occasion the Duke of 
M — was placed astride a cavalry horse that 



36 



THE DOCTOR'S BUFFALO HUNT. 



37 



viciously dismounted His Grace on the 
rump of a buffalo. A rumor got abroad 
that it was a preconcerted affair, but of 
course it was not. Nevertheless, it created 
much merriment among the officers. 

Dr. Jessie Maury, of Philadelphia, and 
W. F. Jessup, also of that city, were guests 
of Captain Joseph Kerin and me, during 
the best of one hunting season, and we 
promised them excellent shooting. Before 
leaving home, these gentlemen had been 
impressed with the idea that it was ex- 
tremely hazardous to hunt among Indians, 
probably having read exaggerated accounts 
of massacres in this particular locality, and 
it was some time before we could calm 
their fears. 

The day arranged for the first hunt ar- 
rived, and as a herd of buffalo had been 
seen South of the fort, we struck out in that 
direction. Captain Kerin, our guests and I 
made up the party. We did not think it 
best to increase the number, as we expected 
to be gone only a short time and not very 
far at that. 

On coming to our game, the shooting 
was good, and the crack of our carbines 
was usually the death knell of a King of 
the Plains. 

After killing a number, our horses were 
too much blown to pursue the herd farther, 
so we turned back. We were jogging along 
in good spirits when a huge bull that had 
strayed from the herd bore down toward us. 
Before he got within range, however, he 
swerved off to the right, heading for the 
Smoky Hill river. 

This was too much for the Doctor, who 
at once spurred his animal to the chase. 
Pell mell he went in pursuit, not heeding 
our cries to desist, as it might lead him into 
dangerous country. Captain Kerin made 
an effort to follow him, but soon returned, 
thinking, as we did, that the Doctor would 
tire and come back. 

We waited an hour, and then seeing no 
sign of our friend we cantered back to the 
Fort, surmising that he would probably 
take a circuitous route and reach home 
about as soon as we. On our arrival he 
had not turned up, and we began to be un- 
easy. The post cannon was subsequently 
fired, and detachments were sent in every 
direction, spending the whole night in 
search, but nothing could be learned of his 
whereabouts. 

Toward noon of the following day, while 
Captain Kerin and I were sitting in front 
of our quarters, discussing the probability 
of the Doctor's being taken by Indians, 
we espied, far out on the plain, a solitary 
horse. We watched it intently, and as it 
slowly drew near we saw it was being led 
by a man — and that man the Doctor. 

A strange procession it was too! The 
horse was besmeared with mud and go- 



ing on three legs; saddle gone, and what 
was left of the bridle around his neck. The 
Doctor, his clothes rent and in tatters, hat 
gone, face scratched and besmeared with 
mud, was the saddest-looking, most woe- 
begone man that could have been found. 
His story was as follows: 

He had chased the bull for miles, along 
the Smoky Hill river, never appearing to 
gain. Night came before he realized where 
he was or how far he might be from his 
friends. He was alone and in a wild coun- 
try. 

By way of explanation, I will say this 
section of the plains, bordering on the 
Smoky Hill river, had been a rendezvous 
for Indians, and many bloody battles be- 
tween them and the troops had taken place 
near this stream. At certain times, especi- 
ally in the hunting season, the Indians in- 
fested the bottoms in large numbers. This 
the Doctor was well aware of, and no won- 
der he felt uneasy. 

He wandered up and down the stream 
for several miles, in an effort to retrace his 
steps; but finding it useless, he determined 
to pass the night to the best advantage. He 
was reconnoitering, when all at once an- 
other bull, with a roar, sprang up in front 
of him. Supposing the whole Cheyenne 
tribe was about to pounce upon him, he 
raised his gun, fired, and sprang into the 
brush. 

Cowering there in the mud, expecting at 
every rustle of the grass to be scalped, the 
Doctor lay until, hearing nothing of the 
redskins, he ventured out and crawled care- 
fully toward his horse, which was brows- 
ing near by. He had barely reached what 
he thought the right location, when he felt 
something cold and clinging about one of 
his legs. Supposing he was in the grasp of 
a rattler, he commenced dancing, but find- 
ing he could not dislodge his foe, he 
reached for his revolver, and fired at the 
reptile, at the risk of shooting off his foot. 
Then, in desperation, he clutched — the cir- 
cingle, which had become detached from 
the saddle, and wrapped around his leg. 

By this time the gallant Doctor was com- 
pletely exhausted. Sinking down in the 
grass, he awaited the break of day, which 
was welcomed with joy. His steed he had 
shot through the shoulder in the first on- 
slaught of the imaginary savages. 

This was the Doctor's first and last hunt 
in the "wild and woolly West." The day 
following, he prevailed upon us to escort 
him to Hays City, the nearest railway point, 
where he took the cars for his home. 

Dr. Maury made many friends in the 
army, and we were all grieved to hear of 
his death, some years ago. 

Mr. Jessup, later, moved to Colorado, 
where, in settling a dispute, he was killed 
by his adversary. 



THE WOLF QUESTION. 



FROM MONTANA, AT LARGE. 

Stanford, Mont. 

Editor Recreation: .1 send you an- 
swers to your wolf questions which state 
the facts as I know them: 

i. Where are you located? 

All over Montana. That is, I travel all 
over it. 

2. Are gray wolves troublesome in your 
region? 

Yes, in some places. In others not. 
They, however, go wherever cattle or 
horses range. 

3. What do they destroy? Horses? Cat- 
tle? Sheep? 

Colts are their favorite meat. They 
do not hesitate to kill cattle, also. They 
occasionally kill sheep; but I think only 
in cases where they are pressed by hunger. 

4. About what amount of damage should 
you estimate they do in a year, in your 
county or range? 

A family of wolves will destroy about 
$3,000 worth of stock per annum. 

5. Did you ever know of a gray wolf kill- 
ing or harming a human being? 

Never. Have heard plenty of fairy 
stories in this line but take no stock in 
them. 

6. Are wolves increasing in numbers? 
Since the present bounty law went into 

effect they are decreasing. 

7. Have you any reason to believe wolves 
can signal across country, and so tell each 
other what parts are dangerous or where 
the hunting is good? 

I believe they can. 

8. What is the average and the greatest 
weight and measure of a wolf, according to 
your certain knowledge? 

Have one. Have never weighed or 
measured one, though I have killed hun- 
dreds. 

9. Do you consider the coyote a nui- 
sance; or do you consider the harm done in 
killing lambs, etc., more than balanced by 
the good they do in keeping down gophers, 
ground squirrels, etc.? 

I do; but think there should be a bounty 
on coyotes, .as well as on wolves. On 
coyotes $3 to $5; on wolves $10 to $15. 

10. What do you consider the best means 
— legislative and practical — of dealing with 
the wolf question? 

The State should fix the bounty and 
then let the stockmen club together and 
hire experienced trappers. Pay them so 
much a month, and let them keep the boun- 
ties they get; but they must hunt on a 
given range, where their employer's stock 
is. If the trapper has a good dog to trail 
wolves in the spring he can find their dens 
and get the whole family. 

J. B. Jennett (Old Silver Tip). 



FROM THE CORPUS CHRISTIE REGION. 

Port Lavaca, Tex. 

Editor Recreation: Allow me to tell 
you of an affair that recently came to my 
notice. A friend of mine, W. B. Garner, 
manages a ranch for T. M. O'Connor, 20 
miles below here. The ranch contains 
97,000 acres of land and has some 25,000 or 
30,000 head of cattle on it. The wolves are 
a great source of annoyance, as well as 
damage, to the owner and manager. Mr. 
Garner has hit on a method of poisoning 
the wolves which is fairly successful, and 
an account of it may interest your readers. 

Armed with a 2 inch auger and a bucket 
of tallow, well saturated with strychnine, 
he goes forth, and at reasonable distances 
apart he bores holes, an inch deep, in the 
fence posts and fills them with the poisoned 
tallow. He bores the holes some 2 feet 
from the ground. 

He claims 2 distinct advantages for his 
method of poisoning the wolves. One is 
that the bait, when once placed, will remain 
effective all winter unless eaten up by a 
wolf or a dog. The other is that, having to 
slowly lick out the tallow, the wolf will 
not get enough poison to act as an emetic; 
but will stop as soon as the poison begins 
to get in its work. He says a wolf or a dog 
will eat tallow when no other food will 
tempt him. 

If Mr. Garner desires to kill possums or 
polecats, he bores the holes 6 or 8 inches 
from the ground, and " the harvest is 
great." These little pests seldom live long 
enough to get 10 feet from the post, while 
a wolf frequently goes half a mile. 

The wolves are fairly plentiful here and I 
have several times been able to ride to 
within 200 yards of them, when armed only 
with a shot gun. 

H. M. Brown. 



FROM IDAHO. 

Parma, Idaho. 

Editor Recreation: We have no wolves 
here. The coyote alone is left on our 
dreary, sage brush plains. The gray 
wolf has been crowded out before the ad- 
vancing tide of immigration. I last heard 
him howl some 15 years ago; but Cousin 
Coyote is everywhere. Each night they 
give a grand chorus in the fields near my 
house. Sometimes they come within 100 
yards. Occasionally the dog makes a bold 
dash and drives them 200 or 300 yards. 
Then they turn and hustle him home. In 
the gray dawn 2 or 3 shadowy forms may be 
seen watching the house, as though they 
enjoyed the humor of the thing. 

I have seen a coyote sit within 50 feet of 
the road as I drove by. Apparently he 



38 



FOR A LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



39 



was deeply interested in something away 
off in the other direction; but all the while 
the corner of one eye was on me. How 
well he knew I had no gun! 

They bother young sheep and hogs here, 
and stray chickens never come home to 
roost, if they once wander from their own 
fireside. The vast number of destructive 
gophers, ground squirrels and rabbits it 
takes to make a meal for a coyote are too 
seldom taken into account. 

Years ago 50 to 100 jack rabbits could be 
seen at once on a grassy plot here within 
10 miles of the State Capitol. It was nearly 
impossible for a poor settler to fence 
against them, and notwithstanding 2 coun- 
ties here have paid out, in bounties, about 
$30,000 we still have plenty of jacks; while 
out in the Eastern part of the State, rabbit 
drives are made to destroy the pests. 
Sometimes as many as 3,000 are killed in 
a day. The coyote undoubtedly holds the 
balance of power, and I leave him free to 
roam over my land. When some old sin- 
ner becomes too pugnacious I administer 
a " broken dose," at long range and it 
seems to do the entire tribe. 

They have great respect for a gun, and 
know when you are out for business. 

Certainly the good they do, in suppress- 
ing these destructive rodents, far out- 
balances the harm they do the few. 

F. R. Fouche. 



AS TO TRAPPING WOLVES. 

Jacksonville, 111. 

Editor Recreation: I have been in- 
terested in the letters on the wolf question. 
When a boy I lived in the territory of Wis- 
consin. Near us lived an old man by the 
name of Dr. Biglow, who had lived many 
years with the Indians. He made his liv- 
ing, principally, by trapping. I visited him 
frequently and once took care of him 
through a sickness he had. During that 
time he taught me how to trap all kinds of 
animals that were found in the country in 
which we lived. 

It was known that he used something to 
bring the wolves to his traps, and he told 
me what it was. He said that when he 
caught a wolf he saved the urine, from its 
bladder, until it became rancid. Then, after 
setting his traps he sprinkled a few drops 
of this over each one. He said this would 
bring a wolf, in a bee line, for over a mile 
when he crossed the wind from the trap. 

The Doctor always set his traps in beds 
of ashes, generally where a log had been 
burned by the forest fires. He smoked his 
traps and his boots, to kill all human odor. 

He said it was much more difficult to trap 
a fox than a, wolf. He told me in poison- 
ing animals never to put the poison in any 
kind of fat; as the fat neutralized the poi- 
son; and to be careful not to use too much 
poison. Geo. Hayden. 



FOR A LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



As an old member of the League of 
American Wheelmen, I sr ould say that Mr. 
Lydecker's idea is certainly commendable. 
A League of American Sportsmen is need- 
ed. There is an immense amount of good 
work which such an organization could do. 

The L. A. W. was organized under much 
more difficult conditions, and with a much 
smaller number of bicycle enthusiasts than 
the L. A. S. would have, at the start. There 
are many thousands of sportsmen, and I 
believe about 170,000 of them are readers 
of Recreation. These should all be glad 
to join the Sportsmen's League, which 
would have for its object the protection of 
game and fish; the educating of young 
sportsmen, and the teaching them that it 
is unsportsmanlike, ungentlemanly, un- 
kind, and " hoggish," to 'slaughter game in 
excess of what they need for their own 
table; or to kill game on its breeding 
grounds, or migratory birds when on their 
way to breeding grounds; or to take fish 
at a season when the taking of one female 
means the destruction of several hundred 
more. 

Personally, I am in favor of a short 



shooting season, and of having the open 
season uniform in the Northern half of the 
United States, between the oceans from 
East to West. In the Southern half of the 
United States the season should also be 
uniform, but somewhat at variance with 
that of the Northern portions. I do not 
believe the passage of game laws, in various 
States, will have nearly so good an effect, 
for the protection of game, as the educat- 
ing of the rising generation, and the teach- 
ing of them as to what should and should 
not be done in the matter of protecting 
game. 

A few years ago the average sportsman 
would boast of the number of birds he had 
killed in a day. To-day it is different. The 
more intelligent sportsmen are close read- 
ers of such journals as Recreation, and 
hence have been educated to look upon 
the killing of an unreasonable quantity of 
game as unsportsmanlike. The result is. 
that these same men now pride themselves 
on having a day's sport and securing only 
as much game as they can use for their own 
tables. 

I am opposed to the sale of game at all 



40 



RECREA TION. 



times and in all places. Make it a mis- 
demeanor to offer game, or game fishes for 
sale, at any time or in any place, and we 
shall have no more market hunters or 
market fishermen. 

When the L. A. W. was first organized, 
there were but a handful of bicycle riders 
in the United States; and what that League 
has done for the bicycle trade, for the sport 
of cycling and for good roads, can be told 
only by those who have been in touch with 
the League for the past 10 or 15 years. It 
had no influential magazine, such as Rec- 
reation, to boom it. It had to get up its 
own paper, and a paper was an essential 
requisite to the success of the organization. 
The L. A. W. tried several times to get 
along without an official organ, and failed 
each time. The membership dropped off 
to a mere nothing, and at one time the 
League became very nearly bankrupt; but 
with an official organ, in the hands of a 
good publisher and a broad gauged editor, 
and a first-class business manager, the 
membership of the L. A. W. jumped from 
20,000 to 100,000 in the short space of 3 
years; and this League is to-day a great 
power in this country. 

Mr. Editor, I heartily agree to support 
the L. A. S. If my long connection with 
the L. A. W. can be any assistance in the 
organization of a L. A. S. it is at your ser- 
vice. I indorse fully and wholly what Mr. 
Lydecker says, and believe that you, as the 
editor of Recreation, with the assistance 
of your valuable publication, can easily 
start an organization of this kind, with a 
large membership at the beginning. 

Sportsmen, as a class, are broad gauged 
fellows. They are good fellows. They are 
the kind of men we all like to associate 
with. Even the narrow minded, narrow 
gauged, penurious people, who take no in- 
terest in field sports like to associate with 
genuine sportsmen. They invariably ac- 
knowledge that sportsmen are genial com- 
panions, and intelligent gentlemen. There 
are a few exceptions, perhaps, but very 
few. 

Some time I want to tell you what I think 
should constitute a reasonable bag of game, 
or creel of fish. . 

N J. Elmer Pratt, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Editor Recreation: I haveTead with in- 
terest the communication in your October 
number, suggesting a National League of 
American Sportsmen. The plan is good 
and I believe it feasible. What is most 
needed to insure game protection is more 
people who will interest themselves in the 
enforcement of the game laws. There are 
plenty of good laws and it is little trouble 
to secure the passage of any that may be 
necessary for the protection of game, but 
to compel their observance is another ques- 
tion. Appropriations for the enforcement 



of game laws are generally inadequate. 
With the laws placed on the statute books 
those who have secured their passage retire 
from the field and leave the execution of 
the laws in the hands of a few poorly paid 
officers, who in many cases have no special 
interest in game protection. With a na- 
tional league every member would be in- 
terested in having the laws respected. The 
officers would be certain of a moral support 
that is now often wanting. A sentiment 
favorable to game protection would be 
fostered, and very soon the man who killed 
game out of season, or in an illegal manner, 
or in excess of legal numbers, would be 
made to feel that he had done something 
unlawful and dishonorable. Public senti- 
ment would accomplish what fear of pun- 
ishment would not. I am in favor of the 
League, will join in its organization and 
will do all I can for its success. 

Wm. A. Richards, 
Governor of Wyoming. 



Editor Recreation: I have read the 
plan for a L. A. S. and am heartily in favor 
of it. We must speedily adopt some means 
of protecting the game from the indis- 
criminate slaughter that is now going on, 
or it will soon be extinct. 

I live in one of the greatest large game 
countries in the United States. I have in 
my possession photographs of thousands 
of elk, taken on their open ranges. I have 
succored starving bands of elk several 
times, to the detriment of my own domestic 
stock. Yet I see around me people specu- 
lating in wild game — principally elk, 
catching them to ship to Eastern markets, 
and killing five for every one saved. 

Nor is this all. Many Eastern men 
hunted here, last fall, who made no discrim- 
ination as to sex. Others boldly announced 
they feared no prosecution, by Deputy 
Game Wardens, as they " had them fixed." 

I am a member of a local game protec- 
tive association, owing considerable prop- 
erty. Our efforts have so far been futile, 
in the proper enforcement of the law. It is 
estimated that 300 non-residents hunted 
illegally in this locality last fall. There has 
not been an arrest or conviction; yet 3 
deputy game wardens were presumed to 
patrol the country. 

From the looks of game interests in Jack- 
son's Hole, this season, I imagine it is as a 
friend of mine once said: 

" We are worse than Bannocks, because 
we are white Indians." So, even in this 
state, a League should gather into its fold 
all those whose hearts are fair to the game 
interests of Wyoming, and of the country at 
large. W. L. Simpson, Jackson, Wyo. 



By all means add my name to the list for 
a National L. A. S., and to anything else 
that will tend to the betterment of our con- 



FOR A LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



4i 



flicting and outrageous game laws. Game 
in the public markets, during close season, 
leads the uninitiated to believe it can then 
be hunted and killed. Woodcock in July, 
ruffed grouse in September, quails and rab- 
bits in November (vide New Jersey laws), 
are perplexing to the honest sportsmen, and 
a loophole for the unscrupulous man with 
a gun, who shoots all that flushes before 
his dog, in any of these months, be the sea- 
son open or " close " for it. And who is 
to detect him? 

Connecticut's law, October 1st for every- 
thing, is a good one. I suggest that the 
parallels of latitude be taken into considera- 
tion; say from here to some point in the 
West, and uniform laws made for certain 
parallels. This has long been my hobby. 

I could elucidate this and go into further 
details, but time does not permit. I trust 
this movement will meet with all the suc- 
cess it deserves, 
A. Clinton Wilmerding, 165 B'way, N. Y. 



I have read with deep interest the article 
in October Recreation, looking toward 
the formation of a Sportsmen's League, and 
cannot see why the idea is not practicable. 
It is certainly good in theory; and I for one 
would be glad to join in any movement 
looking toward the protection of game. 

I liye at Upper Montclair, N. J., where 
a few of us organized the " Heights Fish 
and Game Association, of Essex and Pas- 
saic Counties." Our idea was to get the 
farmers, who occupy desirable land, to join 
the Association, without fees, their contri- 
bution being the posting of their cover. 
Other members pay small annual dues with 
which we bought and put out some quails. 

This has worked well. I believe many of 
our members would join a National 
League. I sincerely hope the plan may be 
put in concrete form and followed up. 

F. S. Hyatt, 

Cashier Clinton Bank, New York City. 



I am very fond of Recreation, and ad- 
mire the noble stand you take for protec- 
tion of game; but it is almost like locking 
the stable after the horse is stolen. Ducks 
are nearly annihilated, in this state, and we 
formerly slaughtered them by the thou- 
sands; never giving a thought to any ques- 
tion of their growing scarcer in future. So 
it is with other game. But after reading in 
Recreation your tirade against the game 
hogs I am ready to quit. 

I like Mr. Lydecker's idea of a L. A. S. 
Let us have such a League, by all means. 

In Colorado we are limited to 20 ducks 
a day. Twelve should be the limit. Twenty 
is too many. Twenty jack snipe is also the 
limit; yet one man came here the other day 
and shot 40, in half a day. Such a slaughter 
of game birds is infamous. Hurry up with 
the League or it will be too late. 

Robert Harris, New Windsor, CoIq. 



I am heart and hand in favor of a L. A. 
S., and any action taken by such a body 
of sportsmen will receive my hearty sup- 
port and co-operation. I have been read- 
ing Recreation for 2 years past. I love 
honest sport, and deplore a fish hog or a 
game hog. I visit the Adirondacks every 
season, where I come in contact with men 
who call themselves sportsmen; yet they 
kill as long as they can see anything to 
shoot at. They fish to see how many fish 
can be caught. One man caught 225 trout 
in one day; and some of them rotted in the 
sun; as he could not eat or give them away. 
He kills grouse on the same scale, and God 
only knows where the game is to come 
from, at this rate of destruction. 

Clinton A. Smith, East Albany, N. Y. 



The suggestion for a L. A. S., as out- 
lined in October Recreation, meets with 
my hearty approval. In fact, the conditions 
of the country demand such an organiza- 
tion, before the cry of " too late " is 
sounded as a death knell to our game. 
Now is the time to act. No one can deny 
the pressing demand for better laws, in 
some sections, and more strict enforcement 
of existing laws, everywhere. Do not cease 
to*agitate the question until the organiza- 
tion is perfected. Then the rest is easy 
and the movement will spread to every 
portion of the U. S. Brother sportsmen: 
Awake to this important question and soon 
every state will be represented. 

B. F. Jones, M. D., Idaho Falls, Idaho. 



The L. A. S. is what we all want. It 
certainly can do a great deal toward game 
preservation, by holding in check the so- 
called sportsmen whose object is to get 
game, " honestly if he can, but to get it." 

There is a growing inclination among the 
sportsmen of this country to look out for 
the game of the future, and it should be 
cultivated. The L. A. S. would be an effi- 
cient and cheap means to this end. I have 
spoken to a number of my friends about it 
and they all favor such an organization. 
It will, I am sure, have a large member- 
ship in a short time. 

H. C. Keneu, New York City. 



The proposed L. A. S. is a good scheme 
and I don't see why it could not be put 
through. We have practically no game to 
protect, here, and if something is not done 
soon, the time is not far distant when the 
whole country will be in the same condi- 
tion. There is only one way to proceed, 
and that is for the sportsmen all over the 
country to organize and insist on the leg- 
islatures of the various states passing laws 
to protect the game, and then providing 
means for the enforcement of such laws. 
You can do a great deal of good by work- 



42 



RECREATION. 



ing this up in Recreation, and I hope you 
will continue the good work. 

R. D. Pratt, M. D., Shelbyville, Ky. 



I heartily approve Mr. Lydecker's idea of 
a League of American Sportsmen. We 
need it badly, and have needed it a long 
time. There are a lot of people who think 
they are sportsmen and who lack a great 
deal of it. There are others who may be 
reticent about the matter, and think they 
are not sportsmen, when they are the real 
ones. This League will set a standard. 
Please count on me as a charter member, 
and whenever the dues are wanted they will 
be sent. 

Permit me to compliment you on the 
work you are doing in Recreation. It is 
indeed recreation to read it. The more 
firmly you stand for the enforcement of 
game laws and the protection of game, the 
better will you be supported and the more 
humane your work. 

M. J. Elrod, State University, Missoula, 
Mont. 



I have just been reading Mr. Lydecker's 
article, in October Recreation, and the 
more I think of it the more I become con- 
vinced it is a great idea. There are thou- 
sands of people in this country who would 
support and encourage such a League, who 
never shoot or fish; but who love the 
woods and waters, the life which adds so 
much to their attractiveness and which is 
so rapidly disappearing. 

I feel impatient to see the work begin. 
There are, I am sure, men who will devote 
the time necessary to work this thing up 
to a successful issue. Count me as one of 
them. The work cannot begin too soon. 
L. A. Huffman, Miles City, Mont. 



I read the letter of Mr. Ralph D. Ly- 
decker, in the October Recreation, with 
deep interest, and I believe a L. A. S. would 
fill a " long felt want." This proposition 
should meet with the approbation of every 
true sportsman. I conferred with Dr. T. F. 
Smith, the President of the Tacoma Rifle, 
Rod and Gun Club, and with a number of 
the members of the club, and without ex- 
ception they all expressed their hearty ap- 
proval of the scheme. 

Meriden S. Hill, 
Sec'y Ferry Museum, Tacoma, Wash. 



I wonder no one has thought of a L. A. 
S. before. Such a League, with the help 
of Recreation, would stave off the ulti- 
mate destruction of fish and game for many 
years. To make an unpopular thing pop- 
ular, identify it with a popular individuality. 
Hence I second the motion to make Rec- 
reation the official organ of the new 
League. Let the thing boom, from the 



first meeting; and the sooner we meet 
and get to work the better. 

Charles F. Wadsworth, Springfield, 111. 



The suggestion for a L. A. S. is a timely 
one and should be acted upon immediately 
by all true sportsmen. We want game and 
fish hogs wiped from the face of the earth. 
In union there is strength. Let us band to- 
gether and do something practical. Count 
me in on this grand movement. 

L. W. Walker, Pasadena, Cal. 



I heartily indorse the plan for a L. A. S. 
Such an organization could do more toward 
preserving our fish and game, than all the 
alleged game protectors in the country. I 
am with Mr. Lydecker, heart and soul. 
R. H. Hendrick, Walcott, N. Y. 



This scheme offers the best solution I 
have yet heard of the problem of game pro- 
tection. I am warmly in favor of it. Count 
me in as a member, when the time comes. 
J. N. Hall, M.D., Denver, Colo. 



I am in favor of any movement looking 
toward the extermination of game hogs 
and fish hogs. Therefore put me down as 
a member of the L. A. S. 

B. C. Broome, 
363 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



Count me in the L. A. S. and let me 
know when you want my; dollar. 

T. K. Tuthill, M.D., New York City. 



I agree with Ralph D. Lydecker that we 
should have a L. A. S. It is a good thing, 
push it along. 

A. F. Crossman, North Clarendon, Pa. 



I fully agree with Mr. Lydecker and will 
do all in my power to help make the L. A. 
S a success. 

D. H. Eastman, Little Falls, N. Y. 



I am decidedly in favor of the idea sug- 
gested on page 266 of the October number 
of Recreation. 

Jas. C. Young, New York City. 



I am heartily in favor of the L. A. S. 
proposition. If such a League could be es- 
tablished game, all over the country, could 
receive ample protection in future. 

F. J. Huntley, Oneida, N. Y. 



I heartily indorse the plan for a L. A. S. 
and would be proud to have the honor of 
being among the first to join. 

C. E. Butler, Salina, Kans. 



FOR A LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



43 



Mr. Lydecker's suggestion is a good one 
and I am ready to be enrolled as a member 
of the L. A. S. 

W. S. Bates, Chicago. 



It will give me great pleasure to co- 
operate with you in the organization of a 
L. A. S. L. C. Whiton, 

Times Building, New York City. 



I shall be. very glad to join the L. A. S. 
as indicated in October Recreation. 
Julius H. Seymour, 35 Wall St., N. Y. 



I am in hearty sympathy with the move- 
ment for a League of American Sportsmen. 

Arthur Audley Brownlee, 63 Wall St., N. 
Y. 



I have read the article about a L. A. S. 
and am with you. 

Wm. W. Seymour, 35 Wall Street. 



I am in entire sympathy with the plan for 
a L. A. S. 

A. W. Dimock, 66 Broadway, N. Y. 



The idea of a L. A. S. is a good one. 
Count on me as a member. 

D. I. Simmons, Troy, N. Y. 



I am heartily in favor of a League of 
American Sportsmen, and believe the idea 
would meet with general favor in this sec- 
tion. 

Chas. Bailey, Garner, la. 



CALL FOR A CONVENTION. 

A merciless war of extermination is be- 
ing waged against the game, the game 
fishes, and the song and insectivorous birds 
of North America. This destruction is be- 
ing wrought by skin hunters, market hunt- 
ers, plume hunters, game hogs, fish hogs, 
market fisherman and, we regret to say, by 
some men who call themselves sportsmen. 

We realize that in order to check this ter- 
rible slaughter, and to prevent the total ex- 
tinction of all game, all birds and all 
game fishes drastic measures must be 
adopted, at once, for the enactment of bet- 
ter game laws, where needed, and for the 
enforcement of existing game laws every- 
where. 

We believe this can only be brought 
about by concerted action on the part of 
all true sportsmen, naturalists and lovers of 
nature. Such action can only be secured 
by and through a national association of 
sportsmen and naturalists. 

In union there is strength. 

We therefore invite all who are interested 
in the preservation of our American wild 
animals, birds, and fishes, to meet with us 
at Hardman Hall, 5th Ave. and 19th St., 
New York, at 10 a.m., January 18, 1898, for 



the purpose of organizing an association to 
be known as The League of American 
Sportsmen. 

(Signed.) 

Rdlph D. Lydecker, Englewood, N. J. 

Hon. W. A. Richards, Governor of Wyoming. 

Prof. W. T. Hornaday, Director New York Zoological Soc. 

Hon. W. M. Kennedy, Pres. B'd of Game Commrs. of Pa. 

Dr. H. M. Beck, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Hon. J. O. H. Denny, Ligonier, Pa. 

Hon. John S. Wise, 44 Broad St., N. Y. 

John Boulton Simpson, 5 E. 14th St., N. Y. 

Hon. W. D. Jenkins, Sec'y of the State of Wash. 

B. F. Bennet, Prest. Fish and Game Association, Mary- 
land, N. Y. 

Col. C. W. Dimick, Gen. Mngr., New England Sports- 
men's Exposition, Boston. 

A. F. Crossman, No. Clarendon, Pa. 

Dr. J. N. Hall, 1517 Stout St., Denver, Colo. 

Ralph H. Hendrick, Wolcott, N. Y. 

Meriden S. Hill, Sec'y. Ferry Museum, Tacoma, Wash. 

F. S. Hyatt, Cashier, Clinton Bank, New York City. 

J. Elmer Pratt, Adv. Mngr. Grand Rapids Cycle Co., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Dr. R. D. Pratt, Shelbyville, Ky. 

W. L. Simpson, Jackson, Wyo. 

Clinton A. Smith, East Albany, N. Y. 

F. J. Huntley, Oneida, N. Y. 

T. G. Bredington, Cranford, N. J. 

Samuel Lowry, Johnstown, Pa. 

W. W. Coleman, Carson City, Nev. 

W. Scott Jones, Akron, O. 

Dr. M. L. Tyler, Chebanse, 111. 

Fred. W. Moffett, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

M. M. Elliott, Detroit, Mich. 

D. H. Eastman, Little Falls, N. Y. 
Otto C. Rottsted, Cattatonk, N. Y. 
Paul W. Gardner, Honesdale, Pa. 

C. E. Butler, Salina, Kan. 
W. S. Bates, Chicago, 111. 

J. C. Young, Sec'y, Madison Square Garden, N. Y. City. 

E. J. Breeze, Forestport, N. Y. 

F. B. Guion, New York City. 
M. L. Miner, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

R. Newton Finck, 32 Nassau St., New York City. 
Ernest Seton Thompson, New York City. 

A. Clinton Wilmerding, New York City. 
Hon. L. A. Huffman, Miles City, Mont. 

B. C. Broome, Jersey City, N. J. 

A. W. Dimmock, 66 Broadway, New York City. 
J. H. Seymour, 35 Wall St., New York City. 

L. W. Walker, Pasadena, Cal. 

L. C. Whiton, Times Building, New York. 

F. A. Musser, Witmar, Pa. 

Dr. A. J. Marling, Greenville, O. 

W. A. Ballard, Scranton, Pa. 

Edward W. Wild, Keene, N. H. 

Arthur F. Rice, Passaic, N. J. 

Chas. F. Hickok, Grand Marais, Mich. 

M. A. Bates, Star, Idaho. 

W. S. Allen, Madison Square Garden, N. Y. City. 

H. C. Wilcox, Friendship, N. Y. 

S. M. Perrigo. 

W. R. Chadwick, Port Huron, Mich. 

E. Shelley Morgan, Portland, Ore. 

Earl Barber, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Wilmot Townsend, Bay Ridge, N. Y. 

L. H. Sargent, North Chelmsford, Mass. 

John A. Tumwall, Lynn Centre. 111. 

Robert C. Fletcher, 382 Elmwood Avenue, Providence. R T. 

J. C. P. Leek, Sec. Marysville Fish and Game 1'ruUc 

tive Assn., Marysville. Mont. 
O. B. Johnson, Orion, 111. 
W. S. Mead, Woodstock, N. Y. 
Dr. Robt. T. Morris, New York City, N. Y. 
Jas. W. Jacobs, Jasper, Mich. 

B. F. Ellsworth, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Thos. V. Farrell, Portland, Ore. 

W. B. Cuckler, Athens, O. 

W. S. Ga'vitt, Lyons, N. Y. 

A. J. Duranrt, Moorestown, N. J. 

T. S. Van Dyke, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Dall De Weese, Canyon City, Col. 

J. S. Stangroom, New Whatcom, Wash. 

Chas. Bailey, Garner, la. 

Paul W. Gardner, Honesdale, Pa. 

Mark H. Warner, Ten Sleep, VVyo. 

Nelson Yarnall Dubois, Wyo. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



NEBRASKA GAME LAWS. 

No. Platte, Netx 

Editor Recreation: The most absurd 
and unreasonable game law ever turned out 
by any body of men was passed by the late 
State Legislature of Nebraska. 

Look at some of the wise provisions in 
this remarkable act. 

All song birds and others " that promote 
agriculture," including turtle doves, may 
not be killed at any time of the year, ex- 
cept on one's own premises. Penalty $3 
to $10. 

It is unlawful to kill Mongolian, or any 
other imported pheasants, for a term of 6 
years, under a penalty of $50 to $100. 

One-half of all fines goes to the informer 
and the balance into the county treasury. 
Justice courts have jurisdiction over all of- 
fences against this, act. 

Muskrats, mink and otters may be killed 
only between February 15th and April 15th, 
except on the owner's premises. 

It is unlawful to kill elk, deer or antelope 
between January 1st and November 1st, 
under a penalty of $15 to $30. 

All species of grouse are protected from 
January 1st to September 1st, and may not 
be snared at any time; fine $5 for each of- 
fence. 

It is unlawful to kill quail or wild turkeys 
between January 1st and November 1st, 
to snare them at any time, under a penalty 
of $5 for each bird. 

All species of water-fowl, including 
geese, ducks, plover, snipe and woodcock 
are protected from May 1st to September 
1st, and they may not be killed at night. 

This part of the law practically forbids 
shooting any grass or upland plover in this 
state, as they do not arrive here till about 
May 1st. Although they breed here abun- 
dantly, the young are full grown by August 
1st, and both young and old have left for 
the South before September 1st. There- 
fore, one of our best and most abundant 
game birds, cannot be killed at all within, 
this state. 

Now for the benefit of those Eastern law- 
makers who may want to formulate a real 
up-to-date game law, let me quote from 
sec. 86 c. 

" It shall be unlawful for any person 
. . . by the aid or use of any raft, punt 
boat, sneak boat or other boat to catch, kill 
or destroy or to pursue after with intent to 
catch, kill, wound or destroy, upon any of 
the waters, bays, rivers, marshes, mud-flats 
or any cover to which wild fowl resort 
. . . any wild goose, brant, duck, etc., 
. . . and it shall be unlawful for any per- 
son at any time of the year to dig, build or 
construct any blind, hiding place or struct- 
ure in the bed of any river, stream or lake 



with intent to catch, kill, wound or destroy 
any of said birds, or at any time of the year 
to shoot or shoot at any of said birds by 
wading in any river, stream or lake or by 
standing in the bed thereof, or to shoot or 
shoot at any of said birds from any such 
blind, hiding place or structure. The pen- 
alty for violating this act shall be not less 
than $25 nor more than $50 for each of- 
fence." 

The law also provides that no one shall 
go upon the land of another person to hunt, 
etc., except by the consent of the owner or 
occupier, under a penalty of from $5 to $100, 
and shall be liable to the owner or occu- 
pier in an action for trespass. 

Will some expounder of the law, explain 
how a man can hunt ducks or geese at all, 
in the glorious State of Nebraska. 

There is no provision for any game war- 
den or deputies, and if there were they 
would have a fine job enforcing such a law. 

If the game law has been utterly ignored 
in the past, how much more will such a 
monstrosity as this be ridiculed. 

This year the fields were full of hunters 
after prairie chickens, early in July, and 
parties openly bragged of having killed 
over 300 chickens and grouse before Sep- 
tember 1st, the end of the close season. 

Some of the local hunters began to kill 
quail early in September, saying, " They 
are fully half grown and make fine eating." 
The only excuse for these fellows is that 
most of them cannot kill one quail in 5 
shots when they are full grown. With a 
reasonable game law, well enforced, Ne- 
braska would be one of the finest of hunt- 
ing grounds, for years to come, but hereto- 
fore the laws have been utterly ignored 
throughout the State. 

.A reasonable and just game law should 
make the close seasons about as follows: 
Song and insectivorous birds all the year; 
turtle doves, prairie chickens and all kinds 
of grouse from January 1st to August 15th. 

Snipe, plovers, tattlers and sandpipers 
April 15th to August 15th. 

Quail from January 1st to October 15th. 

Wild turkeys and Mongolian pheasants 
for 5 years. 

Geese, swans, ducks and all water fowl 
April 15th to September 1st. 

Elk, deer and antelope December 1st to 
October 1st. 

Some additional restrictions would also 
be necessary, but no such absurd and un- 
reasonable ones as are embodied in the 
present law. 

Above all things, game and fish wardens 
and deputies should be provided, to see 
that the laws are rigidly enforced, and all 
violators prosecuted. Without this no law 
can be of much benefit to the game. We 
do not yet need many of the stringent limi- 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



45 



tations enacted in older states, but we are 
sadly in need of a reasonable law with pro- 
visions for thoroughly enforcing it. 

Before closing allow me to compliment 
you upon the stand taken in Recreation 
on the subject of game protection. Let the 
good work go on. 

M. K. Barnum. 



THE COOK'S INLET COUNTRY. 

Seattle, Wash. 
Editor Recreation: The Cook's In- 
let country is Alaska's most wonderful 
combination. At the entrance of the Inlet 
is Mount Augustine, an island which, if not 
a living volcano, is but recently dead. I in- 
fer this from the looks of the land and from 
the fact that the mountain seems to grow 
warmer as you ascend toward the summit. 
In fact, the natives assert that about once 
in 10 years the mountain gives evidence of 
life. 

Flanking the inlet, on either side, are 
towering, snow clad mountains, rolling 
tundras — many miles in extent — with scat- 
tering spruce groves, extensive fresh water 
lakes and broad valleys covered with wav- 
ing grass and nodding flowers. This inlet 
extends so far into the interior that it re- 
ceives a portion of its warm, summer sun; 
also a share of its winter weather, with a 
heavier fall of snow than is found in the 
interior. Here, in all their cold grandeur 
you will see the mighty glaciers—relics of 
past and forgotten ages — sweeping down 
to the sea. 

Here too are wild fowl in great variety, 
and in countless numbers. Gulls' eggs, 
duck and geese eggs are among the staple 
articles of food, during the spring and sum- 
mer months. 

Moose, caribou, mountain sheep and the 
fearless cinnamon bear roam over the 
mountains and valleys, worthy game for 
any man's steel. 

But one place in all the known world 
(the Bay of Fundy), has a higher tide 
than is found at Cook's Inlet. Here the 
full moon tide is 45 feet, and the highest 
spring tide over 50 feet. The inlet has 
nearly 100 miles of tide flats that are un- 
covered at low water; and on these flats 
many a poor prospector, not accustomed 
to such high tides, has been left with 
his small boat, by the receding waters, 
miles away from the beach. Then, some 
hours later, he has watched with fearful 
forebodings the incoming tidal waves, and 
has listened to his death knell in the sullen 
roar of this mad rush of waters. 

On the shores of this inlet can be found 
the relics of a people who were once here 
in great numbers. Tyonick, which is lo- 
cated on the North foreland, 100 miles up 
the inlet, had at one time, according to 
native tradition, over 10,000 inhabitants. 



To-day the caving banks of their ancient 
grave yards expose to the view of the 
passer-by many human skulls and bones. 
On the advent of the white man these peo- 
ple withered away like the leaves of the 
forest and to-day a dozen natives and one 
white trader comprise the entire population 
of Tyonick. I send you herewith an old 
coin which I picked up on the beach at Ty- 
onick. It may or may not be of historic 
value.* 

On the beach at this place can be found 
small pieces of amber; also plenty of semi- 
petrified wood, which makes good fuel. 
There are great coal deposits near the en- 
trance to Cook's Inlet, at Coal Harbor. 
There is also a large coal oil marsh back 
near the mountains, opposite Kasilkoff. 

Here the lordly king salmon, weighing 
40 to 100 pounds is taken, in great numbers, 
on Six' Mile and Resurrection creeks and 
their tributaries. 

Hydraulic mining is carried on success- 
fully, here, while the gulches, at the head 
waters of the Kenai, show evidence of hav- 
ing been mined years ago, by the Russians. 

There is plenty of timber for domestic 
purposes at the Inlet. To the North are the 
Shushitna and Knik valleys — 2 in one as 
it were. About 45 miles up the larger 
stream is a series of rapids with a trading 
post near by; and up this valley is a good 
winter route to the Yukon, 400 miles 
away, over an open, rolling country, prin- 
cipally high divides. 

Alaska is the only frontier we have left 
and Cook's Inlet is one of its favored spots. 
I predict that the present generation will 
see many prosperous towns and villages on 
its shores. 
L. L. Bales, Alaska Guide, Seattle, Wash. 



A SHOSHONE VIEW OF IT. 

Salt Lake, Utah. 
Editor Recreation: We were in the 
vicinity of the Jackson Hole country, the 
sportsman's paradise of America, at the 
time of the late Indian scare in that local- 
ity. It was in the month of July, when 
all nature was clothed in its richest garb; 
the roaring streams kept perfect time to the 
music of the breezes as they whistled 
through the immense forests of stately 
pines; the grand and majestic Teton Peaks 
were always in view, seemingly endeavor- 
ing to push their spires through the clouds 
above. The laughing waters were clear and 
pure, and millions of gamey trout were 
sporting on the surface. No matter in what 
direction one might turn, the eye would 
rest upon a scene indescribably wild. It 
seemed that this particular spot was^ set 
apart by the hand of the Lord for the enjoy- 

A copper coin, apparently of Russian make, but so worn 
that the date is lost.— Editor. 



4 6 



RECREA TION. 



ment of the sportsman. With such sur- 
roundings, we were loath to depart and 
leave behind such magnificent sport as 
awaited us. However, the fates seemed to 
be against us. Reports came that the coun- 
try just beyond was alive with Indians, who 
were slaughtering the elk by hundreds. 
Every messenger would add something ad- 
ditional to the already distorted facts, un- 
til it was believed that every person in the 
surrounding country was fleeing for the 
settlements below in order to save his scalp. 
It was reported that 5 Indians had been 
killed by the whites, and as a result the 
Indian was on the war path in earnest. 

Exaggerated reports were telegraphed 
throughout the world. The war depart- 
ment, took prompt action, and ordered 
Companies D, E, H and I from Fort 
Robinson, Neb. It did not take long for 
these troops to begin their march toward 
the towering Tetons, and it was at that 
time I met and had a long talk with Captain 
Jim, Chief of the Shoshones. 
' Captain Jim is an aged and trusted Ind- 
ian, who has been a scout for the Govern- 
ment for 30 years. He has been intrusted 
with many important missions in his time. 
When I met him, the gray haired buck 
seemed to be in his element, as he sat on his 
pony and was piloting General Coppinger 
and his colored troops to the scene of the 
Indian depredations. 

Asked as to the method of Indian war- 
fare, the old chief replied: 

" One Injun alle same 3 whitee man, 
when Injun know country. In Nez Perce 
war, Injun had 700 warriors, and whitee 
man had 4,000. Injun scared whitee man 
alle time 4 months, and kill 150 whitee man, 
and Injun lose only 4 men." 

When Captain Jim was asked what he 
thought of the present disturbance, he 
said, " Injun Agent telle me no talkem 
now. Pretty soon, heap lot fight. May- 
be Injun heap killem nigger soldier, maybe 
all of 'em. Injun maybe go back home; 
me tink so. Maybe he fight now, me don't 
know. Whitee man, he killem 5 Injun. In- 
jun heap mad now, bad heart. Me go see, 
and maybe bring him home to reservation. 
He no come, maybe Big Father bring more 
soldier man." L- M. E. 



GAME A NUISANCE. 

In his annual report to the secretary of 
the interior, Acting Superintendent Young, 
of the Yellowstone national park, says: 

" The prevailing impression is that game, 
buffalo excepted, is increasing in numbers. 
The black bears have increased rapidly, and 
have become very annoying. Complaints 
have come in from Norris Lunch station, 
Fountain hotel, Thumb Lunch station, 
Lake Hotel, and from the station of a de- 
tachment of soldiers at the canon, that bears , 



have broken into their storehouses and de- 
stroyed meat and other provisions in large 
quantities. It is a common occurrence to 
see from 6 to 12 bears, any afternoon, feed- 
ing on the garbage dumps within a hundred 
yards of the Fountain hotel. . Among the 
number is one large grizzly. At Norris, 
Fountain, Thumb, Lake and Canon lunch 
stations and hotels the bears feed daily on 
the garbage from the kitchens. At least 12 
bears might be disposed of to responsible 
zoological gardens, where desired, for the 
expense of capturing, which would be 
small. 

" The number of buffalo is estimated at 
24. An expert hunter, equipped with a 
good knowledge of the park, as well as of 
the habits of the game therein, is engaged 
in making thorough observations with a 
view of estimating closely the number of 
each species within the park boundaries, 
including the annexed timber reserve. 

" I have consulted with Dr. Frank Baker, 
superintendent of the National zoological 
park, at Washington, as to the advisability 
and practicability of corraling the remain- 
ing buffalo in the park with a view to their 
preservation and increase, and our concur- 
rent conclusion is that it has been the ex- 
perience of most persons engaged in the 
capture and domestication of wild animals 
that, while the young of 2 classes, to one of 
which the buffalo belong, may be caught 
and confined with usually successful results, 
it is otherwise with adult animals, a large 
proportion of which fail to adapt them- 
selves to even slight restraint, and die in 
consequence. As to the practicability, the 
buffalo remaining in the park are now 
scattered in very small herds at a number 
of points far remote from each other. They 
are mostly in rough, ragged regions, where 
they could not safely be captured alive, and 
their ranges are separated by mountains, 
streams, and canons of such impassible 
character that their transportation could 
not be accomplished without great injury 
and loss. Even were the advisability of the 
project free from doubt, the difficulties in 
the way of its successful accomplishment 
appear to be insuperable. 

" The coyotes are numerous and bold. It 
is estimated that of a herd of 500 antelope 
that wintered in the valley of the Gardiner, 
and on the slopes of Mount Evarts, 75 (15 
per cent, of the herd) were killed by coyotes 
during the past winter, and many antelope 
fawns, elk calves, and broods of grouse 
have been destroyed by them this season. 
The opinion has been advanced by a few of 
the friends of the park that if the coyote is 
exterminated the gopher in time would 
eradicate the grass from the winter valley 
ranges. I do not concur in this opinion, 
and request authority to reduce the num- 
ber of coyotes so that they will not hunt in 
packs." 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



47 



OLD KATE BRUIN. 

Dayton, ©hio. 

Editor Recreation: Not many years 
ago the National Soldiers' Home, at Day- 
ton, Ohio, boasted one of the finest game 
parks in the country. It was one of the 
chief attractions of that handsome Home, 
which to-day ranks as the best in the world. 

The park at one time included fine 
specimen of elk, buffalo, deer, bear, mink, 
otter, beaver, alligators, eagles, lions, and 
many other American species. 

Of late years, however, the game has 
been dying off, and no effort has been made 
to replenish the supply. Nothing remains, 
now, but a few Virginia deer, and it is only 
a question of time when they will be dis- 
pensed with. 

Old Kate who was recently killed was 
one of the largest black bears in captivity. 
She outlived many other animals who were 
installed in the park long after her. At one 
time her family consisted of 5 or 6 mem- 
bers, but they have long since passed in 
their checks; yet as years flew by, Old 
Kate seemed to be enjoying splendid health 
and to be good for a number of years yet. 
At the time of her death, she was nearing 
her 26th anniversary. 

Recently Governor Thomas decided to 
dispense with the bear, on account of her 
age and the trouble of maintaining her. 
She was becoming vicious, toward 
strangers, although the game keeper, -Jen- 
nings, apparently had no fear of her. She 
seemed on friendly terms with him at all 
times. He has looked after her for the past 
10 or 12 years and she came to know him 
well. 

One day in April last'I was called on to 
despatch old Kate. Although this was not 
a pleasant duty I responded rather than 
have Kate suffer from any possible awk- 
wardness of inexperienced executioners. 

My friends, Mr. Albert Kerns, the well 
known attorney, and a skillful amateur 
photographer; Frank McMillan and Harry 
Johnson, both young business men of Day- 
ton, accompanied me to the Home, with 
their cameras, in the hope of getting sev- 
eral good views of the old bear. We tried 
to get her into the open cage, so as to get 
several pictures of her while alive; but she 
preferred to stay in her den; so I was re- 
quested to fire as soon as she stirred in the 
den.^ With the assistance of several 
soldiers we managed to get her out and 
just as she showed her face in the door I 
fired. She sprang forward, bleeding pro- 
fusely, but turned and disappeared in her 
den. Her gasps were plainly audible, but 
none of us ventured in, for although we 
knew she was hard hit, it was possible she 
might still have life enough to do some 
savage work. The cage door was finally 
opened and I jumped in with my rifle 
cocked. At this moment the bear raised 
her head and with a quick aim another shot 



was fired, hitting her in the base of the 
brain. She made one turn and dropped in 
her tracks, forever quieted. Then the as- 
sistants ventured in. 

How to get her out of the cage was the 
next serious question. Rope and tackle 
had been prepared, but unfortunately could 
not be used. After several efforts, and with 
5 good men at the ropes, she was finally 
hauled out and drawn under a tree, where 
several exposures were made by the gentle- 
man mentioned, but it was too late in the 
day to get good photographs. 

The first bullet penetrated her skull 
fairly between the eyes, passing through 
the head, breaking the back bone, severing 
the jugular, glancing down through the 
breast and the forearm and lodging about 
3 inches back of the shoulder blade. The 
second bullet penetrated the side of the 
skull, right at the base of the ear, and 
passed clear through. Such is the killing 
force of a 38-55-255 Winchester rifle, using 
metal jacketed bullet. I used in these cart- 
ridges 19 grains of DuPont's smokeless 
powder. Where the bullet had entered 
the skull, the hole was barely larger than a 
lead pencil, although after entering, the 
path made by the bullet was terrible; cov- 
ering a space of 3 inches of ground bone 
and flesh. 

We put the old bear on the scales and she 
weighed 592 pounds. Her length, from tip 
to tip, was 6 feet 9 inches and her girth 5 
feet ^Vz inches. She was said to be one of 
the largest black bears in captivity. 

Walter Keenan. 



HUNTERS RETURN HOME. 

Jerome Marble and his hunting parcy, 
who left Worcester, Mass., in September, 
in the palace hotel car, " Yellowstone," for 
a month's hunting trip in Minnesota and 
North and South Dakota, reached home 
early in November after a most delightful 
and successful journey of 34 days. In ad- 
dition to Mr. Marble, the party included 
Mrs. Marble, A. W. Gifford, Arthur E. Gil- 
ford, Mrs. A. B. F. Kinney, Mr. and Mrs. 
V. D. Kennerson and Lester P. Kennerson 
of Worcester; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. 
Sturtevant and Laurens N. Sturtevant of 
Quincy, Miss L. A. Putnam, of Quincy; 
Lewis Eddy, of Dorchester; W. E. Har- 
mon, of Lexington; Miss Helen S. Grif- 
fiths, of Lexington; John M. Johnson and 
G. Pearce, of Norwich. 

Good shooting was found at various 
points beyond St. Paul, and, if the report 
given by the Worcester " Spy " is correct, 
the men killed a great deal more game than 
they should have killed. 

Mr. Marble, whose address is Worcester, 
Mass., is now contemplating a similar trip 
through North Carolina, Georgia, and Al- 
abama, and another, starting in March, t# 
go to Mexico, California, Oregon and 



4 8 



RECREA TION. 



Washington, visiting all the points of inter- 
est on the way, and from Washington a trip 
will be made, by steamer, to Alaska. The 
return will be made over the Canadian Pa- 
cific road, through the most picturesque 
country in the world. Yellowstone Park 
will also be visited, en route. 



TIME WAS UP. 

Holly, Mich. 

Editor Recreation: One afternoon, in 
the fall of 1892, I started out with my new 
hammerless breech loading gun, from Mil- 
ford, Mich., after squirrels. I had bagged 
one black, 3 gray and two fox squirrels, 
when I saw another fox that seemed the 
largest one I had seen for years. I first 
saw him on the ground, far away. In my 
efforts to steal on him, he discovered me, 
and started on a long run-through the 
woods. I was fortunate enough to keep in 
sight of him, until he ran up a tree, when, 
by a careful approach, I got within shot of 
him before he " holed." 

The first barrel killed him, in the crotch 
of the tree, but he did not come down. I 
fired 4 more shots but failed to dislodge 
him. I then tried to stone him out, with- 
out success, and finally concluded I must 
lose him. That, I hated to do, for he was 
an unusually large one, and I wanted to 
take him home. After exhausting every 
other resource, I decided to climb the tree, 
which was a dreadful task. It was a large 
oak, nearly 2 feet in diameter, and fully 20 
feet to the first limb. 

I pulled off my hunting coat and hat and 
hung them on my gun which I leaned 
against another tree; and with only my 
hunting shirt, vest, trousers and shoes on, 
I went at the tree. Half a dozen times, on 
the way up, my courage almost failed me; 
but I stuck to the task, until I finally 
reached the squirrel, and threw him down. 
He was certainly the largest one I had ever 
killed. 

When I got to the ground, again, I was 
too tired and weak to stand up. I rested 
awhile and declared I would not climb an- 
other such a tree for 50 just such squirrels. 

I roamed about the woods for another 
half hour, but saw no more game, and as it 
was getting late I thought I would start for 
home. Imagine my surprise, when I felt 
for my watch, to find it was gone. Only 
the guard bar and a small piece of the chain 
were in the button hole of my vest. Where 
I could have lost it, I could not imagine, 
unless it was where I had left my coat, near 
the tree I had climbed. 

To find that tree again I did not believe 
possible. Anyone who has been in the 
woods knows how difficult it is to locate a 
certain tree in a strange piece of timber. 

After searching a long time, however, I 
found it, and although every foot of ground 



around it was searched carefully, my watch 
could not be found. I gave it up as lost, and 
had decided to go home, as it was nearly 
dusk. I felt as though my afternoon's 
sport, had been rather a dear one. Then I 
took a last look up the tree, where I had 
shot the squirrel, and you can imagine my 
surprise to see my lost watch, swinging in 
the breeze at the end of the broken chain, 
from a twig fully 40 feet from the ground. 

In coming down, the charm had caught, a 
link of the chain had broken and my watch 
had been noiselessly purloined from my 
pocket. 

There was but one thing to do, although 
I had declared I would not climb that tree 
again for 50 big fox squirrels; yet I would, 
and did, climb it again for a gold watch. 
My " time was up " and I had to get it. 

C. P. Bissell. 



A LEGAL QUESTION. 

Podunk Woods, Pa. 

Editor Recreation: I am a law abid- 
ing citizen, and I want the other fellows to 
be law abiding too. 

I want to preserve the game in this neck 
o' woods, but I'm a little puzzled; so I 
write you for information 'cause you know 
most everything, and I want you to be spry 
and answer me quick. 

The fact is Bill Hunter has violated the 
game laws pretty bad, and I think he ought 
to be yanked up and fined, heavy. 

I see in our daily paper, under the head 
of " New Game Laws," an opinion from 
the Deputy Attorney-General. 

He says, " Any one violating the law is 
subject to a fine; and if he don't pay the 
fine he must serve one day in jail for each 
dollar of the fine he don't pay." 

He further says, " One half of the pen- 
alty goes to the complainant, and the bal- 
ance to the county treasurer." 

Now Bill has broke the law pretty bad, 
and I think 'he ought to be fined about $20. 
If he wouldn't pay the fine he would have 
to go to jail for 20 days; and as one half 
of the penalty goes to the " informer " I 
would have to go to jail for 10 days, 
wouldn't I? But may be he would scrape 
around and get money enough to pay one 
half the fine and take the other half in jail. 
In that case which half would I get? 
Would I get the $10 in money, or the 10 
days in jail? 

And if I got the $10 in money would the 
county treasurer get the 10 days in jail? 

I would like the $10 mighty well. It 
would come handy to pay taxes and buy 
groceries with; but if I should make a grab 
for the $10 and miss it, and get 10 days in 
jail, that wouldn't be so convenient. 

I feel a little skittish about it; for as one 
half the penalty goes to the county treas- 
urer, I am afraid he'd get the money and I'd 
get the jail. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



49 



Now Mr. Editor, hurry up and let me 
know how it is; for I dassen't begin to 
yank up Bill till I hear from you, lest I get 
more then I bargain for. 

Yours for law and justice. 

Hank Backwoods. 

P. S. Pennsylvania Law. 



A SOUTHERN CRUISE. 

Beardstown, 111. 

Editor Recreation: My family and I 
feel that we are acquainted with you 
through Recreation. My wife is a good 
shot, and we believe in the gospel of open 
air. We are spending a few days with 
friends in Sangamon valley, on the Illinois 
river near Beardstown. Here are abun- 
dance of quail and chickens. The game 
laws are well enforced. The lakes are 
stocked with fish; crappie, pike, bass and 
thousands of gamey little sun-fish, which 
are not bad sport when the others fail to 
bite. The game and fish hog gets the cold 
shoulder here. When Recreation has 
1,000,000 subscribers the hogs will have no 
place on this earth, and there will be fish 
and game enough to satisfy all true sports- 
men. 

October 15th we leave Beardstown, in 
our boat. Will travel the Illinois river to 
• the Mississippi, then down to the Sunk 
Lands of Arkansas. Later we go on to 
New Orleans and the Gulf and take passage 
to Fort Myers, Florida. My wife and our 
little son will be my companions on the 
journey. 

We never fail to say a good word for 
Recreation. Birds should not be shot 
during their spring flight. The females of 
game animals should be spared at all times. 
The game hog and market hunter should 
be suppressed by well made and well en- 
forced laws. If these principles are carried 
out we will have an abundance of game, 
even in the thickly settled portions of our 
country. Wm. Clark. 



WHERE TO GO TO TRAP FURS. 

Vancouver Island, B. C, is a sportsman's 
paradise for game and fur. On the North- 
ern half of the island can be found elk, deer, 
black bear, cougars, wolves, lynxes, wild- 
cats and coons, beavers, land otters, fishers, 
martins, minks, blue grouse, ruffed grouse, 
ducks, geese and brant. To make a special 
hunt in B. C. would cost a non-resident 
$50; but there is no license for trapping. 
That is free to all alike. 

The best trapping grounds are found in 
the interior of the island, from the head of 
Campbell river to the source of Salmon 
river, on a long chain of lakes about the 
middle of the island, with the exception of 
land otter, which are found along the rock 
bound coasts of the many bays and inlets 
on salt water. However, these otters go to 



the lakes to breed, in spring and summer, 
and return again to salt water in the fall. 

A dozen beaver and otter traps, and 4 
dozen martin and mink traps, with the dead- 
falls that can be built, will be plenty for one 
man, and one rifle or shot gun, or both. 

To reach the grounds take steamer or 
cars from Seattle, Wash., to Vancouver, B. 
C. Then take steamer Comox or Rain- 
bow, to the Hastings lumber camp, at 
Bear River, Vancouver Island; thence 
3^2 miles to Bear lake, by trail, which is 
the first of a chain of lakes that extends 
for 40 miles. 

Unless you are in the company of some 
one who knows the country it will take 
you one season to learn the details. But 
for a hunting or trapping country Van- 
couver Island is all right. 

L. L. Bales, 
Alaskan Guide, Seattle, Wash. 

HOW TO HOLD. 

Dear Sir: I take the liberty of seeking a 
few points on duck shooting* through your 
valuable columns. I am a fair wing shot; 
but on ducks I meet with little success. I 
shoot a 10 gauge Parker, with No. 5 shot. 
I think my ill luck is owing to miscalcula- 
tion of distances. 

A reply, through Recreation, will con- 
fer a favor on a lover of the gun, but not a 
pot hunter. 

Chas. Ellis, Denver, Col. 

I referred this to Mr. Wilmot Townsend, 
who replies as follows: 

Mr. Ellis' statement that he is a fair wing 
shot, seems to me, to make the matter sim- 
ple of explanation. I should say his trouble 
lies not in " miscalculation of distances " as 
he puts it, but rather in miscalculation as 
to the speed of his game. I take it that he 
has not done much duck shooting, from 
the tone of his letter. If he will increase his 
lead on cross shots, giving them 6 to 12 
feet for their ordinary flight, and when they 
boom down on the wind, from 16 to 20 feet, 
aye, and even more, I think he will be in the 
right way of solving the problem. The 
speed of wildfowl is tremendous, at times. 
and great all the time; and the majority of 
misses are caused by not leading them 
enough. 

With practice Mr. Ellis will soon get the 
hang of it; but at first he will find it hard 
to believe that one must lead his ducks such 
a distance. 

His gun should at least be a modified 
choke, for this work, though I prefer full 
choke in both barrels. 

Wilmot Townsend, Bay Ridge, N. Y. 



THE GRIZZLY BEAR CONTEST. 

Recreation's grizzly bear makes his 
second bow to his friends, who have been 
shooting at him so industriously ever since 




WHERE THE 3 SHOTS WENT. 



September ist. He is slightly disfigured, 
but still in the ring. You will see 3 bullet 
holes in him. Bullet number 1 went 
through his heart, when he ran 50 yards 
and fell dead. The next time , he came 
along, bullet number 2 went through his 
brain and he fell dead in his tracks; yet 
strange to say he showed up again — that 
is, in the imagination of the hunter, who 
fired the third shot at him as he disappeared 
behind a rock. This caught him in the 
ham and severed a small artery, without 
breaking a bone. The hunter trailed him 2 
miles, by the blood, but the wound had by 
this time closed up and the flow of blood 
had ceased; so that the poor old grizzly 
escaped after all. 

About 1,500 shots were fired at him, in 
all, and below I give a list of the names of 
the hunters who planted all 3 of their shots 
in the right places, according to the above 
diagram, which was made out and filed in 
this office, when the hunt began: 

R. M. Jackson, L. W. John, B. H. Pettit, H. D. Luse, 
M. K. Barnum, J. B. Gillett, C. H. Sloane, M. C. Marsh, 
H. T. Greene, E. D. Bond, T. C. Halsey, C. E. Breder, 
H. M. Wolf, C. F. Gardner, A. E. Fischer, R. Bieber- 
stedt, R. O. Baylor, C. H. Buell, B. F. Kizer, James 
Whyte, B. Bassell, Jr., W. H. Foss, G. B. Dennick, 
Thos. R. Ketcham, and O. L. Wood. 

It was stated in September Recreation 
that whoever should locate these 3 shots 
correctly would receive, as a prize, a yearly 
subscription to Recreation. Of course 
the above named gentlemen, like all sensi- 
ble sportsmen, are already subscribers to 
Recreation; but each has been credited 
with another year, in addition to that for 
which he had already paid. 



I shall probably get up another hunting 
puzzle, in the near future. In fact, it is safe 
to always count on finding something of 
special interest in the columns of this mag- 
azine. 



WHEN TO STOP. 

I read with much interest the article in 
August Recreation, headed " What Con- 
stitutes a Reasonable Bag? " and your com- 
ments on the prowess of a Mr. Leaven- 
worth; who, his friends say "is a hunter 
for the love of the sport, and never took 
more than he could use." 

I was told a few days ago, of a man — prob- 
ably " a hunter for the love of the sport " 
— who at Blue Hole Tunnel, W. Va., killed 
20 squirrels, with a club, as they landed 
from swimming New river. This was a 
man who knew nothing of the meaning of 
true sport, and to whom the word extermi- 
nation, was meaningless. Mr. Leaven- 
worth, who, as a gentleman sportsman, 
should have known better, killed at least 
150 squirrels more than his share. Mr. 
Knight, and his companion, were evidently 
trying to make a record, or they would not 
have boasted of taking 105 quails in 10 
hours. Twenty quails should satisfy any 
one to whom the mere bagging of game, is 
not the only pleasure derived from shoot- 
ing. 

I heartily agree with your opinion, in re- 
gard to Mr. Jaques' theory that " a reason- 
able bag is all a man can kill with a gun." 
He tries to modify this, by time, amount of 
game, etc., but the fact remains, that if a 
man kills everything he can, he will prob- 



5© 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



5i 



ably keep it up as long as there is anything 
to kill. This system, practised extensively 
by the negroes in some parts of Virginia, 
has almost exterminated the rabbits and 
wild turkeys. C. D. K., Newport, Ky. 



doing noble work in preserving the game 
of our country. 

E. K. L., Otsego, Mich. 



TOO MUCH LIKE SLAUGHTER. 

Your regard for Mr. Roche, is enough to 
convince me of his character as a sports- 
man; but I think him unfortunate in his 
friends. If he imagines their skill will be 
admired, or the use they made of it, appre- 
ciated, by readers of Recreation, he is mis- 
taken. Those expert hunters may not wear 
bristles or be in danger of pickling in brine, 
but they can depend on being pickled in 
Recreation, when their exploits are pub- 
lished. 

Think of it — 105 quails in one day! That 
ranks Mr. Roche's friends with the 
Steven's Point, Wis., hogs, and with the 
Boston swine, who boasted of taking 120 
trout in an hour. It is a puzzling ques- 
tion to me, how these skilful butchers get 
their game home. Do they take along a 
wheel-barrow or hire an express-wagon to 
follow up their bloody trail? 

A reader suggests giving the game hog 
a rest. That is just the trouble; they have 
had too much of a rest, and not enough ar- 
rest. " There shall be no rest for the 
wicked," and the rest of us will try to re- 
strain them until you, Mr. Editor, get 
rested. 

Sam. Crofoot, Fond du Lac, Wis. 



QUIT WHEN YOU GET ENOUGH. 

I would like to add my testimony as to 
what constitutes a reasonable amount of 
game for one man. I believe 12 squicrels 
is all any man should want to kill in one 
day. 

I have hunted for 33 years arid never but 
once exceeded that number. Why kill all 
in one year? Why not let them increase, 
so as to have good shooting again? Why 
this spirit of slaughter should enter into 
man's nature, I cannot see. 

There are few men living who love shoot- 
ing better than I, but I never did have a 
disposition to kill more than I could use. 

I spent the summer of '8o in the vicinity 
of North Park, Colorado. At that time you 
would never be out of sight of antelope. 
In crossing the Park, a distance of 57 miles, 
I could easily have killed all a team could 
haul. Yet my partner and I killed but one. 
That was all we could use. 

We passed 300 carcasses in crossing the 
Park. From some a ham was taken; 
others a quarter, and again a piece of ten- 
derloin. To-day antelope are almost a 
thing of the past, in that locality. 

I should like to see every sportsman raise 
his voice against the slaughter of our game; 
so I say, " Long live Recreation! " It is 



A GOOD PLACE TO GO. 

Schoolcraft County, Mich., is a fine coun- 
try for fish and game. Dr. R. C. McKes- 
son, of Manistique, is game warden, and he 
is the terror of all illegal hunters and fish- 
ers of that section. 

I have been there several seasons; was 
there this summer, trout and bass fishing. 
Caught several messes of brook trout, the 
smallest were 12 inches long. Deer and 
ruffed grouse are very plentiful. Ducks are* 
as numerous there as mosquitoes in June. 
I always go to Abe. Hughe's place, 35 miles 
from Manistique, up the Indian river. 
Those who have once been to Abe's, go 
there again if they can. From Manistique, 
take the M. and N. W. R. R. to the Pull 
Up, which is 5 miles from Abe's clearing, 
in the heart of the game country. Abe will 
meet you there if you write him in care of 
C. L. Co.'s Pull Up, Manistique, Mich. 
He is a thorough woodsman, and will give 
you all the pointers you want; and his wife's 
pies are the next thing to ambrosia. 

t W. S. Bates, Chicago, 111. 



THE PENOBSCOT FOR BIG GAME. 

There are hundreds of sportsmen in New 
York City interested in that part of the 
Maine wilderness known as the " Hunters' 
Paradise." For their information I will 
say a trip up either the East or West branch 
of the Penobscot, for 25 miles, will be one 
of the best in Maine. Deer are plentiful 
anywhere in the woods. 

While in camp on Ripoganns Carry, last 
spring, we made a negative of a ruffed 
grouse sitting on her nest. Carry pond lies 
just off Ripoganns, and is noted for its 
splendid trout. ' 

Big game is numerous near the base of 
Mt. Katahdin. The West Branch river 
runs within 4 miles of the basin. From the 
bank of the stream, near Athol and Katah- 
din brook, a good trail leads to the summit 
of the mountain. There are hundreds of 
acres of table land on the mountain, over 
which large numbers of caribou roam. 

Quite a number of ladies climbed Mt. 
Katahdin last season. It is a hard climb, 
but you are fully repaid as you take in the 
beauties of the surrounding wilderness. It 
stretches away on every hand for miles and 
miles, with its hundreds of lakes reflecting 
the beautiful tints of autumn foliage. 

Peace and contentment comes to him, 
who, worn out by the excessive demands 
of our hustling American life, can lay aside 
these cares for a short trip to this wonder- 
ful country. 

F. E. Farnsworth, Fitchburg, Mass. 



5* 



RECREA TTOJSr. 



GAME IN ALASKA. 

Editor Recreation: Deer are surpris- 
ingly abundant 6n the islands in this part 
of Alaska, and we seldom have to go more 
than a mile from the beach to find them. 
They are killed the year round for food, and 
rarely hunted for their skins. Our deer are 
smaller than the Eastern red deer, but fully 
as fine venison. 

At this season, the bucks are on top of 
the mountains, where they spend most of 
their time fighting one another with their 
new horns, that have just shed the velvet. 
The does and yearlings stay lower down, 
often along the beach, in grassy places. 

I have killed many deer with a 22 calibre 
rifle, by shooting them in the head. 

There is talk of building a packing house, 
in this country, to can venison. Our people 
are opposed to it; being warned by the 
havoc the canners are making of the sal- 
mon. The concerns that put up salt bellies, 
throwing away the rest of the fish, are the 
most destructive. We often see a pile of a 
half million decayed salmon; the refuse of 
a pack of less than 2,000 small barrels. 

Black bears are sometimes numerous 
along the salmon streams, coming from the 
hills to feed on the fish. 

I noticed the first flocks of wild geese 
moving South, on September 6, just a day 
ahead of a cold snap. Ducks have not be- 
gun to flock yet. 

Ptarmigan are now full grown, and oc- 
casionally come down on the open beach. 

Many fur seals are taken here at Dixons 
Entrance, , during the spring, and some- 
times, a sea otter. 

Geo. G. Cantwell, Houcan, Alaska. 



BERRYING ON THE PEND D'OREILLE. 

Usk, Wash. 
Editor Recreation: My wife, daughter 
and I, recently went down the river to get 
some alder berries. As we were out of 
fresh meat, I told them to take the boat, 
and I would walk through the woods, and 
see if I could get a deer. Although deer 
are plentiful here, none but the white-tail 
comes down in the flat country, and any 
hunter knows that he is very fortunate if 
he gets one of them in a half day's hunting. 
I had not gone far before I could see from 
the tracks that there were plenty of deer. 
Going very slowly through a small slough, 
I unfortunately stepped on a twig. It broke 
with a sharp report, and I immediately 
heard a splashing and running, but was too 
late to get a shot. I could tell from the 
snorting or whistling that there were two 
or more deer, and I knew from the tracks 
they were large ones. I had but little hope 
of getting any meat that day, and was walk- 
ing along rather carelessly, when looking 
ahead about V2 mile, I saw 2 feeding right 
toward me. The wind being in my favor, I 



sat down by a big log to awak develop- 
ments. It was probably y 2 hour before 
they came within 100 yards of me. 

The buck was a monster. My 40-65 
spoke his death warrent at the first report, 
although I shot him once more, on the run. 
He had an elegant head of horns — 13 
points. 

This country is certainly an ideal place 
for the hunter or fisherman. I killed 8 
mallard ducks at 4 shots this morning and 
was only gone from the house 45 minutes. 

John B. Renshaw. 



NEVADA GAME HOGS. 

Carson City, Nev. 

Editor Recreation: The educating in- 
fluence of Recreation has not spread far 
enough in this vicinity; for some, who call 
themselves sportsmen, go out before the 
law is off grouse and quail, and shoot large 
numbers of them. When law abiding 
shooters wish to enjoy a day's sport they 
must tramp all day for nothing, where a 
month before the season opened one could 
put up 5 or 6 coveys of quail. 

When I spoke to the proper officer about 
this illegal shooting, I got a shrug of the 
shoulders, and " What can we do? We can- 
not convict if we make an arrest; " and such 
I understand is the case. 

The constitution of our state gives all 
fines to the school fund; yet our game law 
provides that one half the fine shall go to 
the officer making the arrest, and an officer 
so doing cannot collect, as it is unconsti- 
tutional. 

There is work ahead for all who uphold 
the principles set forth in Recreation, if 
they wish to protect our game from poach- 
ers, and make the chances for a day of 
pleasure more abundant. 

Ducks and geese are very scarce so far 
this season, possibly owing to the lakes and 
marshes farther North not having frozen 
over. 

There is a question I would like to ask, 
through your magazine. Is it a fact that 
parties hunt the eggs of our wild fowls in 
their Northern breeding places, to secure 
the albumen? I have been told that boats 
go North every season for the purpose of 
gathering albumen. W. W, C. 

So far as I have been able to learn there 
is no truth in this report. — Editor. 



LIMIT THE BAG. 

Merrimac, Mass. 

Editor Recreation: I want to relieve 
my mind about pot-hunting and its remedy, 
if there is one. 

New England is blessed with more than 
her share of this sort of beast, and the 
sooner he is suppressed the better, for both 
game and sportsmen. Nearly every ham- 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



53 



let in this state has its pot-hunter, while 
many have several. They hunt from the 
day the law is off till snow flies, without a 
stop to rest. They are all fair shots and all 
take advantage of the game, or rather take 
it at a disadvantage, if possible, which no 
true sportsman will do. I know of several 
— no doubt the number reaches the hun- 
dreds — who kill from ioo to 500 ruffed 
grouse, quail and woodcock every fall. 
They never eat a bird, but always shoot to 
sell; most of them making fair wages for 
the season. 

I have been through the shooting 
grounds this fall and previous years, after 
the active shooting was over, only to find 
perhaps 2 or 3 stray birds in a whole lo- 
cality, where there should be 100. Birds 
are scarce and are growing more so each 
year. It will be but a short time ere the 
grouse will be a rarity in this locality. 

Can there be a law to regulate this 
slaughter? Has any section such a law? 
If so I hope some of the readers of Rec- 
reation will tell about it. 

I see but two plans, viz., limit the number 
of birds killed, as are deer in Maine and 
New York; or prohibit game being 
shipped from the town or county wherein 
it is killed. 

I hope to hear from others on this sub- 
ject. " It is now or never," and something 
must be done. 

H. E. Barton. 



OUGHTjTO HAVE KILLED A GRIZZLY. 

N. Ontario, Cal. 

Editor Recreation: Last week a party 
of 4, Mr. Scott, Rogers, " Ought " and I, 
went up the San Antonia mountains, about 
10 miles North of here, to hunt deer, and 
give Ought a chance to kill a grizzly that 
had been seen in that region. Over our 
evening camp fires, we discussed the bear 
question. Ought said he would like to see 
a bear, and pepper him with a 40-65 Win- 
chester. All he wanted was a chance. I 
warned him to be cautious if he found one, 
and be sure he had some advantage on his 
side, before attacking. He insisted he was 
not afraid of any bear in the mountains. 

On the third day out, Mr. Scott secured 
a 3 point buck, the first deer he had ever 
killed. Hearing the shot, I went to him, 
and we dressed the game, and started with 
it for camp. We had not gone far, when we 
met Ought and Rogers hurrying for help — 
Ought, had found his bear. 

He had been on a rocky point, for 15 
minutes, watching for deer, when, looking 
about, he saw, 30 feet below him, a grizzly 
lying asleep. At this chance of a life-time, 
Ought's heart failed him, and he crept cau- 
tiously away, to enlist recruits for the war. 
We returned with him, though we knew 
the bear would be far away before we 
reached the spot where he had lain. It was 



but a short distance back, and Ought led 
us silently to the rock, and leaned over. 
The look of disappointment on his face, as 
he turned to us, was pitiable. The bear had 
gone. 

On our return home, Ought was the first 
to tell the story, and own that he had been 
afraid of one bear, at least. 

A. G. Allen. 



ANOTHER BRUTAL SIDE HUNT. 

FROM THE LEBANON, N. H., "FREE PRESS." 

All the men in town who know a gun when they see it, 
and all others who ever heard the gun question discussed, 
as they smoked their T. D.'s about the livery stable office 
stove, have been pressed into a game hunt this week. John 
S. Freeman is the great (?) leader of one faction, while P. 
A. Waterman heads the other. The hunt was set for Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, but in truth it begun last Friday 
night, and has been going on ever since. The following 
schedule has been arranged : A red squirrel counts 50 
points ; partridge, 200 ; rabbit, 200 ; fox, 500 ; duck, 200 ; 
crow, 150 ; grey squirrel, 200 ; woodcock, 300 ; coon, 500 ; 
quail, 300 ; hawk, 150 ; owl, 200 ; deer, 2,000, 

All game was to be brought in last night, by 12 o'clock, 
save coons, the men being given until 8 o'clock this morn- 
ing to get them in. For the wind up a game supper is 
to be served at the town hall, this Friday evening, 6 to 8 
o'clock. . . ." 

Accompanying the above clipping a 
Lebanon subscriber sends me a yellow 
hand-bill which announces this great 
slaughtering match, in circus poster type, 
and which contains the names of 140 game 
butchers, divided into 2 teams, and each 
under the leadership of a captain! I regret 
that for lack of space I cannot print the 
names of these game hogs in this issue, 
but may do so later. 

The subscriber who sends in this account 
says: 

" I enclose a bill of game slaughter, and hope you will 
roast these hogs as they deserve. Red squirrels may not 
be game, but they are harmless little creatures ; and that a 
barrel full of them should have been shot and brought in, 
and then thrown on the dump to rot, is an outrage. All 
the true sportsmen, here, are indignant at this piece of 
wholesale slaughter." 

It seems incredible that so large a num- 
ber of game hogs could be found in any 
one town in the East. Talk about Indians 
as game destroyers! I never heard of .a 
band of Indians, or savages of any nation, 
committing as fiendish a piece of butchery 
as this appears to have been. — Editor. 



INDIAN ART COLLECTION. 

Antonio Apache, the Indian scout and , 
scientist, whose recent tour through the/ 
Maine and New Brunswick wilderness re- 
sulted in securing so many valuable feat- 
ures for the New England Sportsmen's 
show, is now in the far West collecting ma- 
terials for that Show. 

He has secured an extensive collection 
of antique and unique specimens of Ind- 
ian art, of rare value, and has already 
shipped 10 cases of Pueblo pottery, and a 
number of bales of Navajo blankets, which, 
with rugs, robes and curios, will play an 



54 



RECREA TION. 



important part In the forthcoming exhibi- 
tion, and will serve as valuable souvenirs 
for those who are fortunate enough to ob- 
tain them. 

Tents of birch bark, inhabited by full- 
blood Indians, wearing rudely fashioned 
garments of furs and buckskin, will be in- 
teresting features of the show. 

In point of realism and scenic effective- 
ness this Indian camp will undoubtedly 
prove a revelation, not only to those whose 
journeyings have never led them beyond 
the confines of civilization, but to the great 
army of sportsmen. 



GAME NOTES. 

When one is forced to forego the pleas- 
ure of a trip to the woods or fields, noth- 
ing does him so much good as to read the 
experiences of others. No true sportsman 
wants a monopoly, but is willing that 
others should have a chance. 

I do not approve of an early opening of 
the season. When I read " Ruffed Grouse 
and Woodcock," by " M. B.," in the Sep- 
tember number of Recreation, and came 
to, " The day of our hunt was hot; such a 
day as fairly curls one's gun barrels," I 
thought how much more M. B., and his 
friend would have enjoyed themselves if 
the opening season had been the first of 
October. 

Then Jack Frost drops the leaves from 
the trees and the blood quickens in one's 
veins. The days are cool and pleasant and 
after a hard day's tramp in the fields and 
woods how one can sleep! 

I like Recreation for the way it goes for 
the fish and game Hogs. I always spell it 
with a big " H." I feel that you, dear 
editor, share my sentiments in regard to a 
later day for the opening season for grouse 
and woodcock. 

J. W. Burnside, Schenectady, N. Y. 

I do, most heartily. — Editor. 



The homely advice, "Don't be a hog," is applicable to 
hunters of a certain type. Everybody knows the type of 
man who covers the front of his camp with massacred 
grouse or deer, geese or ducks, and then sits down with 
an "I-shot-'em" look on his face, to be photographed. 
He has no use for so much game. He and his friends can- 
not use it, and he does not intend to sell it. He is a 
butcher and not a sportsman. A spoilsman does not kill 
everything he sees, for the mere sake of killing. Yet this 
fellow, who has not yet developed beyond the savage stage 
of his bloodthirsty ancestors of a few generations back, kills 
for the pure love of killing, and pays some newspaper man 
to recount his murderous exploits and print his portrait, 
surrounded by the evidences of his own bloody and inhu- 
man tastes. If the happiness and health of the city man 
depend on his going to the woods and killing something, let 
him at least use some kind of moderation, and " Don't be a 
hog." — Editorial in the Minneapolis, Minn., "Times." 

Good for the Times Editor. He is a 
sportsman, and, of course, a gentleman. 
If all newspaper men had as much sense of 
decency, and as much nerve as this man 
has, the millenium of game protection 
would arrive much sooner than we can now 
hope for it. — Editor. 



Early in the morning of September I, 
the opening of the reed-bird season, 2 
friends and I, went down the " Neck," in 
the marshes along the Delaware river, for 
a day's sport with reed-birds. At daybreak, 
the shooting commenced, and a continuous 
fusillade was kept up the whole day. 

From 4 o'clock in the morning until 2 
in the afternoon, we bagged nearly 3 dozen 
reed-birds, 2 plovers and 3 rails. 

The best shooting for reed-birds, down 
the " Neck," is between September 1 and 
October 5. 

If it were not for market-shooters, there 
would be many more birds. Market- 
hunters commence shooting as soon as the 
birds arrive — about the latter part of Au- 
gust. 

I have known of 2 pot-hunters (regular 
hogs), before season, killing 12 dozen reed- 
birds in less than 3 hours. They also shoot 
plover, snipe, ducks and rails long before 
season. If a stop is not soon put to these 
outrages, there will not be a single bird left. 

I would like to have some brother sports- 
man, kindly inform me what kind of game 
(large and small) is found in Pike county, 
Pa. O. Fisher, Phila. 



I read Recreation regularly and like it 
very much; especially its stand in regard to 
the preservation of fish and game. I do not 
slaughter game myself, nor allow others to 
do so. I take my patrons and guests to 
good hunting and fishing grounds, and 
when I think they have had their share of 
sport, I take them elsewhere. Every man 
should be satisfied with his share; but I 
find some are never satisfied. 

We have a large territory of hunting and 
fishing ground, with plenty of both large 
and small game. 

So far as it is in my power, I see that the 
game and fish laws are enforced. 

Recreation takes well with my guests, 
and makes a good hotel magazine, for this 
part of the country. 

Guy H. Remore, Bernidiji, Minn. 



One of the principal features at the 
Fourth Annual Sportsmen's Exposition 
and Bicycle Show, to be held at Madison 
Square Garden January 13 to 22, will, be a 
rifle tournament. There will be an individ- 
ual championship match, open to all, 100 
yards off hand, at a 25 ring target, dis- 
tance 100 feet. The entrance fee for this 
contest is $5. which will include a season 
ticket to the Exposition. First prize, 
championship .trophy and $20. The other 
12 prizes will divide $110. A continuous 
match, open to all, distance 100 feet off 
hand at a 25 ring target. Entrance fee, for 
ticket of 3 shots, 50 cents. First prize $50; 
$140 divided in other prizes. There will be 
a target of honor and a bulls-eye target 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



55 



open to all. Full money prizes and pre- 
miums will be given. The target of honor 
will have $100 in cash prizes. 



Here on Lake Traverse is a queer state of 
affairs. On the marsh may be seen from 8 
to 12 tents of market hunters. They shoot 
black powder, before sun rise and after sun 
set. The business men of the town go out 
and slaughter game for market, because if 
they don't the market hunters will get it 
all. Chickens are killed before the law is 
off. The limit on ducks and chickens is no 
more observed than the Koran. About 
6,ooo ducks have been sent to St. Paul, by 
business men and pot hunters. Do I be- 
lieve all the game I see going there, from 
this state, is eaten there? No, not by sev- 
eral carloads. 

Pink Edge, Wheaton, Minn. 



I first went to Plattsburgh, N. Y., where 
I shot a few ruffed grouse. I then went on 
to Argyle, Minn., one station North of 
Warren. I looked up 2 sportsmen who 
took good care of me. I did not have much 
time, but shot a reasonable number of 
chickens, ducks, jack-snipe, plover, etc. 
The weather was a trifle hot, 104 , and the 
dogs could not do themselves justice. 

Game is not plentiful in the, vicinity of 
the railroad, anywhere, this year; but by 
driving about 50 miles East of Argyle, to 
the Thief river country, great sport can still 
be had with chickens and geese. One party 
came in with 103 chickens, for 2 days. You 
have to take a tent and grub, if you go in 
there. Livery horses are cheap. There is 
a good Hotel at Argyle. Geo. Harris, 
station agent, Great Northern R. R., will 
set anybody on the right track. 

E. A. J., Hackensack, N. J. 



I have mailed you a photo of a fawn which 
I caught some time ago, and which became 
a great pet. Deer are plentiful at present 
and will afford good hunting this fall, if 
they are not molested by wolves, or driven 
too far back by dry weather. There were 
a good many deer killed here last season, 
as every man paying his 50 cents license put 
in full time in order to make sure of his 
limit, 5 deer; while the non-residents were 
obliged to stay away, or pay $25 to hunt. 
The hunter from outside is usually satisfied 
with one deer, and is willing to return to 
his home after a few days' sport, while the 
home hunters are never satisfied until they 
reach the limit., Therefore, I think it would 
be much better to make the fee the same for 
all, and if necessary for any difference, 
make it in the number of deer each shall 
be allowed to kill and to ship. 

C. G. Shepherd, Lathrop, Mich. 



dead bears, a ruined rifle and a crippled 
man. The man, who "was working in a 
lumber camp, went out one Sunday, with 
a 22 calibre rifle to shoot grouse. Find- 
ing a cub bear, he drove it up a tree, 
and shot it until it died, by which time it's 
hide would have made a good sieve. 
Shouldering the cub, he started for camp, 
when the mother bear appeared, and dis- 
puted the right of way. He shot the old 
bear with the 22, and when she closed in, 
clubbed her with it until it was knocked 
from his hand. While the bear was chew- 
ing him, he used a knife, as best he could, 
and succeeded in killing her, after she had 
made him a cripple for life. 

M. P. Dunham, Redlodge, Mont. 



The Montreal " Star " gives a most pa- 
thetic account of the work of a lot of game 
butchers, in slaughtering fawns and female 
deer in the woods of Canada, during the past 
summer and fall. A game warden found, in 
the hands of a hide dealer, in Montreal, 
2,6 skins of fawns, which he had bought 
from these game butchers, and it is believed 
this is but a small portion of the number 
this dealer has handled. From the condi- 
tion of these skins, it is easy to determine 
that the animals were nearly all killed dur- 
ing the close season. The fine for killing 
deer, in close season, in Quebec, ranges 
from $2 to $100 for each offence, and it is 
earnestly hoped the vandals will be detected 
and punished, to the full extent of the law. 



As I was being paddled down the St. 
Croix river, quite close to the shore, I 
noticed something lying on the bank, a 
short distance ahead. Not much attention 
was given to it, for I thought it was a deer, 
a common sight there. 

We were moving quite rapidly, so when 
I looked again we were within 20 or 30 feet 
of the creature. At that instant he raised 
his head and I saw it was a Canadian bay 
lynx. I at once gave him a charge of shot 
in the eyes, killing him almost instantly. 

As much as I have been in the Maine 
and Canadian woods, this was the first 
lynx I ever saw alive. 

H. B. Clewey, Woburn, Mass. 



Two bears, a 22 rifle and a man were 
recently mixed in these parts. Result, 2 



In the fall, the sportsmen of Warren 
have great sport coursing jack rabbits with 
greyhounds. The adjacent country is level 
prairie, excepting along Snake river, and 
the farms are not fenced — just the place for 
coursing. 

On a hunt last fall, I rode in a sleigh. As 
we were spinning over the prairie, the rab- 
bit made a sudden turn. We followed and 
the sleigh struck an ant-hill, hidden under 
the snow. In an instant we were over. Al- 
though the rabbit was killed, we did not 
see the close of that hunt. ^ 

C. S. H., Warren Minn. y 



56 



RECREATION. 



Permit me to congratulate you on the 
splendid picture of wild geese in the August 
number. Have been comparing the picture 
with my live decoys', and it is certainly true 
to life. 

In the little piece of fiction, " Woodcock 
and Ruffed Grouse," why not have had the 
imaginary birds killed according to law? 

I have been out of good old New York 
State for the last 2 years, but hardly be- 
lieve the law has been altered so birds can 
be killed, lawfully, in the " latter part of 
August." 

A. S. Doane, Coinjock, N. C. 



Game in this section is plentiful. Rabbits 
are more common than dogs; there are 
also numbers of turtle or mourning doves. 
Grouse and quails gave us lots of fun last 
season. There are a few foxes, gray and 
red, left; also a few " bob-cats." Fox, 
gray and black squirrels are more plentiful 
than they were last fall. 

We had a few law breakers around us last 
fall and quite a number of game hogs. Our 
game warden will make it hot for the out- 
of-season shooters. 

A. Englecamp, Saginaw, Mich. 



Recreation comes regularly, and I 
think it the handsomest magazine in the 
country. 

Will you kindly say we got our new stat- 
ute through. Now no man in this state can 
" sell, barter, or propose for sale, or have 
in possession for the purpose of sale " any 
quail, prairie chicken or grouse, for an un- 
limited term of years. We have worked 10 
years on this one point. 

F. M. Gilbert, 

Game Warden, 1st Dist, Indiana. 



While down at the station, one morning 
in September, I heard some one calling my 
name. Looking through the crowd, I saw 
a friend who had just returned from the 
Adirondacks. He took me into the bag- 
gage car and there showed me a spike 
buck. It weighed 185 pounds, my friend 
said. 

We took the deer home, and a butcher 
came to cut it up. " Spoiled," was what 
he said when he saw it. So we buried the 
buck, and became converts to a later open 
season. 

Harry E. Spaulding, Cambridge, N. Y. 



I would like to hear the opinion of some 
of Recreation's readers, on the mourning 
dove. They are numerous around here and 
I have been trying my skill at them with a 
shotgun. Recently I heard from some of 
the farmers that they should not be killed; 
for the mates will mourn themselves to 
death. I would like to know if this is true 
or nothing more than an idle tale. 
Louis Boettger, Jr., Callicoon Depot, N. Y. 



I am a sportsman and reader of Recrea- 
tion. Here in Eastern North Carolina we 
have many ducks, brant, geese and swans. 
The wild fowl come in October and No- 
vember, and stay until March and April. 

A mile from my home there is good fish- 
ing; while in the woods nearby there are 
squirrels, rabbits, coons, deer and bear. 

Another attraction is a fine road for 
wheelmen; for 10 miles there is not a hill 
3 feet high. 

S. S. Lupton, 
Hobucken, Pamlico Co., N. C. > 



We organized a club here, called the 
Recreation Club, and your magazine is 
our favorite journal. We all think there is 
nothing like Recreation. We love to see 
the game hogs get roasted. On Saturday, 
November 6th, 3 members of the club took 
a run to the country, after rabbits. We got 
3 rabbits and were entirely satisfied. We 
hunt for sport, not for meat. 

H. M. Watson, Jr., Lancaster, Pa. 

I thoroughly appreciate the honor you 
have conferred on Recreation in naming 
your club for it, and have ordered a flag 
made and sent you, which will be appropri- 
ately inscribed. — Editor. 

When Dr. Robert Bell, of the Canadian 
Geological Survey, returned to Ottawa, the 
other day, from his explorations in Baffin- 
land, he found awaiting him the agreeable 
news that he had been elected a Fellow of 
the Royal Society of London, at the last 
annual meeting. This is the highest honor 
at the disposal of British scientists, and 
only a few new Fellows can be elected each 
year, owing to the limited number of va- 
cancies. This year there were 15 vacancies 
and over 90 candidates, from all parts of the 
Empire, most of whom were scientists of 
high standing. 



A great many dogs are used for hunting 
deer, in Northern Michigan, near Trout 
lake and Naubenway. This makes the deer 
so wild they leave that locality. Please 
mention in Recreation, that the readers 
would like to have something more from 
Percy Selous. 

E. J. M., Traverse City, Mich. 

The J. H. Martin Rod and Gun Club will 
have a general reorganization soon. The 
officers are, John McCain, Pres.; Elbert 
Brack, Vice-Pres.; Livert McCain, Sec, 
and Gottlieb Brack, Treas. 

The club has 16 members, and will have 
more soon. 

Livert McCain, Little Rock, Ark. 



A party of 4 of us, and a guide, went out 
late last fall, and in 3 days got 2 bear and 2 
deer. A. J. Merrill, Jay, N. Y. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



IS THE OUANANICHE A FRAUD? 

EUGENE M'CARTHY. 

I returned in September from my 
eleventh annual visit to Lake St. John for 
ouananiche, thoroughly satisfied with the 
number of fish I killed, and with their fight- 
ing qualities. In quantity there may be a 
diminution, from a decade ago; in fighting 
action none. Akin to the salmon, the ou- 
ananiche does not vary in its manner of 
taking the fly, or its action when hooked, 
from its illustrious progenitor. From a 
yearly experience during the length of time 
above mentioned, I believe myself capable 
of defending the " little salmon " against 
the unfavorable charges made against it in 
an article headed " Is the Ouananiche a 
Fraud?" in September Recreation. 

Some 7 years ago a well known salmon 
fisherman made himself heard in 2 sporting 
journals, bitterly denouncing the ouanan- 
iche and its fighting qualities. Result — 
such a flood of indignant replies that in the 
end, he stated he had not given the fish a 
fair trial, and would again do so, and ad- 
mit his error, or otherwise, as the facts 
warranted. He has remained silent since. 
A friend of mine was once invited to a sal- 
mon preserve. Within a week — his limit 
of time — he killed 3 or 4 medium sized sal- 
mon, none of which fought very hard. He 
at once rushed into print, stating that sal- 
mon fishing was decidedly over-rated. An- 
other friend came to try his first bass fish- 
ing in Oneida lake, at my invitation. He, 
unfortunately, struck a bad time, and re- 
sults were poor. His deduction was that 
bass fishing was no good. Shall we con- 
demn salmon and bass fishing as a conse- 
quence? 

There is no fishing that does not have its 
good and bad days, and seasons. Suppose 
the man who tries it for the first time hap- 
pens to strike the bad season, or a run of 
small fish, shall his condemnation libel the 
fish? I do not believe so, when thousands 
of anglers, who seek the ouananiche year 
after year, agree that it is the gamiest of 
fresh water fish. Individual success or non- 
success is a very poor argument, against 
the experience of hundreds of anglers. 

Not over %. to possibly y 2 of salmon 
killed, take the fly other than under water. 
The others will break water or jump en- 
tirely out for it. The same rule holds good 
for ouananiche. It is immaterial to me 
whether they take the fly below, on the sur- 
face^ or above; there is just as much skill 
required to hook, play, and bring them to 
net. 
_ I must therefore deny that they do not 
rise to the fly. Just as large a percentage 
do, as of salmon themselves. Only a cer- 



tain proportion of trout, bass, or any game 
fish will jump out of water for the fly. The 
ouananiche compares more than favorably 
with that proportion. In speaking of the 
way the ouananiche takes the fly your con- 
tributor says, " He just opens his mouth 
and sucks it down." The ouananiche 
rarely, if ever, hooks otherwise than in the 
lip, indicating a strike, not a suck, and gen- 
erally lightly, as does the salmon. A trout 
or bass usually gorges the fly, hooking well 
back in the mouth or throat. Not over one 
in 50 or 100 ouananiche will ever hook back 
of the lip. 

Let me relate my experience. In 2 days, 
on the third pool of the Metabetchouan, 
during September last, I killed 16 ou- 
ananiche; none jumping less than 6 and 
the majority over 8 times. These fish 
weighed 3 to 5 pounds. My average time 
taken to bring them to net was 12 to 18 
minutes. This season's fishing was in no 
way an exception to those preceding. I 
have never, at the Grande Decharge, Meta- 
betchouan, Ouiatchouan, Ashuapmouch- 
ouan, at the fifth falls of the Mistassini, or 
at any of the 11 falls of the Peribonca river,, 
and lake Tschitagama beyond, found the 
fish to vary much in size or action from 
what I have stated above. 

Trolling with flies perfectly represents 
the impatient fisherman. He naturally 
covers more ground in so doing, but while 
he may catch more fish they are as a rule 
smaller. The true angler, imitating Isaac 
Walton in patience, locates himself at a 
good pool, and casts his fly until success 
rewards him. Success not so much in num- 
bers, but in hard fighting, large sized fish. 
He who so fishes cannot truthfully say, the 
size and action of his fish are not satis- 
factory. 

I am willing to admit that the ouanan- 
iche are not so plentiful as they were sev- 
eral years ago. Enough remain, however, 
to thoroughly satisfy the true angler. Mr. 
Beemer, the lessee of all the ouananiche 
waters, will have a hatcherv in, full working 
order another year, that will quickly restock 
the waters. 

Ouananiche fishing, like all other kinds, 
depends much on time and place. Every- 
one seems to seek the Grande Decharge 
at about the same time. As a result, it 
is over-fished, and far from satisfactory 
luck is had. Seek the other rivers, at the 
times I have set forth in my previous writ- 
ings on the ouananiche, with sufficient time 
for success, and no complaint will be made. 
As to the price charged for ouananiche 
fishing, I have nothing to say, except that 
it is worth it. If salmon, the king of salt 
water fishes, are worth $50 each, the aver- 
age price it costs to kill them; its de- 
57 



58 



RECREATION". 



scendant, the fresh water salmon, king of 
fresh water fishes, is worth one hundredth 
part, 50 cents, as the average catch per day 
will cost. 

Ouananiche fishing is sui generis, as is 
salmon killing. Preliminary fishing in the 
Nepigon, in Maine, the Adirondacks, Scot- 
land or any other section, is of little value, 
no matter how long practised. This fish- 
ing, at the proper time and place, demands 
that one almost learn fishing over again 
to be successful. His former trout or bass 
experience is of little value, and his judg- 
ment is but little better than an amateur's. 

" Four pounds is a big ouananiche." I 
must disagree with this statement. I con- 
sider it a medium or rather an average 
weight. Six or 6 x / 2 pounds are large ones, 
and are frequently taken. It is heavy 
for trolling, not for casting. I must also 
submit that the unknown adjectives applied 
to the guides, and their quoted French, 
have nothing to do with the argument, un- 
less to bring out the proper claim that no 
better guides or canoemen exist anywhere. 
As for Mr. Beemer's preserve on the 
Grande Decharge, it is nearer 12 miles in 
length than 5 or -6. The number of good 
pools contained in it would run into the 
hundreds. Certainly not a very limited fish- 
ing ground. His other territory covers 
over 1,000 miles of ouananiche fishing 
waters. 

It can be guaranteed that when one fishes 
properly for ouananiche, and secures them 
as they can be secured, not only rods, but 
tips and leaders as well, will be smashed. 
This is the experience of hundreds of 
anglers. As to the eating qualities of the 
fish, that is a matter of taste. The concen- 
sus of opinion is that it is equal in every re- 
spect to the salmon, excelling it in that it is 
not so oily. 

The letter given in your September num- 
ber " is a matter of opinion," but if an opin- 
ion is radically wrong, it is subject to crit- 
icism. Individual opinions are allowable, 
but should not be advanced against the uni- 
versal opposite opinions of the multitude. 

The moral to be deduced, is to never con- 
demn any especial sport at sight. This your 
correspondent has done. An old member 
of the St. Marguerite salmon club not long 
since said to me that they occasionally 
hooked a ouananiche on their preserve. 
His final remark was, " I would just as soon 
kill a ouananiche as a salmon, as it will 
outfight and outjump a salmon of twice its 
weight." How does this coincide with what 
your contributor states? 

In conclusion, I would add that just as 
large fish, and as satisfactory fishing, have 
been had this season at Lake St. John as 
at any time in some years past. Not every 
day but as a whole. This I learn from 
'fishermen who have been* there, not from 
" the record book at the hotel." I will 
only ask your correspondent to again try 



ouananiche fishing properly, and I will 
guarantee he will become an enthusiastic 
convert to the sport, as have many others. 
I will gladly advise him personally when 
and where, if he so desire. 



FISHING THROUGH THE ICE. 

COL. FRED MATHER. 

In the November Recreation the editor 
asks for some points on fishing through the 
ice, for pickerel, which request recalls the 
days of youth, when winter sports were dif- 
ferent from those of the same season to- 
day. The change has not been in the 
sports. No, it is in the man. Half a cen- 
tury ago (I love to count time by centuries 
now) we boys, just like the boys of to-day, 
cared nothing for the blasts of winter. A 
frozen ear, or toe, while skating or taking 
pickerel through the ice, was a mere inci- 
dent not to be considered seriously, so long 
as it was incurred while engaged in any 
real sport. 

Mark the change which comes with 
years. Now the main charm of winter con- 
sists in sitting by the fire and rehearsing the 
sports of other days; or in " good com- 
pagnie " to discuss the venison and currant 
jelly; the roast grouse and a bottle of Bar- 
zac, or a canvas-back, au naturel, and a 
champagne, if you will; or, better, one of 
the wines of Burgundy, into which the sun- 
shine on the hills of Cote d'Or has been 
preserved in bouquet. 

" To this complexion must we come at 
last," as Hamlet says. And so an old man 
gradually shifts into " the lean and slip- 
pered pantaloon, his acts being 7 ages." 

With this as an apology for writing about 
a sport in which I have not recently par- 
ticipated, but which is just the same old 
sport that it was, and ever will be, we will 
take a look at it, as we boys loved it. 

Said Garry Van Hoesen; " There's goin' 
to be ice enough to bear us on the lake to- 
morrow, an' we'd better git out and have 
the first whack at the pickerel, in the morn- 
in'; 'cause if we don't the ice '11 be thicker 
nex' day an' we can't fish as many holes." 

" To-morrer's Friday," said John At- 
wood, " an' I've got to go to school. Make 
it Saturday." 

" All right," said Garry, " but the ice '11 
be 2 inches thicker an' the holes harder to 
cut. In 4 inch ice we can cut 30 holes in an 
hour; but if it's 6 inches you cain't do 
more'n half the number. I tried it once 
when the ice was over a foot thick, and it 
took all the morning to cut 3 holes; an' 
we ought to have about 50 holes for 3 of 
us." 

And so we boys went to the lake with an 
axe, an ice chisel, lines and a lot of live 
minnows, in 2 buckets, which the cold 
water kept alive until we could make a 
change of water on the way. The ice was 



FISH AND FISHING. 



59< 



about 5 inches thick and while one boy cut 
holes with the chisel, about 40 feet apart, 
another took the axe and made tip-ups, 
from limbs of trees; for we boys had never 
seen the patent contrivances now on sale, 
which hoist a flag when a fish is hooked. 
We cut limbs about 2 feet long, which had 
twigs nearly opposite. On one of these we 
left the little branches and the other was 
cut off to 3 inches. The line was made fast 
to the main stem and led to the end of the 
short twig, where a half-hitch held it. The 
limb was laid across the hole and the weight 
of the long twig on the ice balanced the 
minnow, but a pull on the line raised the 
signal by pulling the short twig down into 
the water. 

The lines were baited by hooking a min- 
now just below the dorsal fin, but not far 
enough below to paralyze it by injuring the 
backbone and so preventing its swimming. 
The water was 10 to 30 feet deep, and we 
let the minnows half-way down. Then we 
skated around, to keep warm, until the sig- 
nal came from some hole, that a fish had 
struck. We had to see that our tip-ups 
were not frozen fast, and that the minnows 
were kept alive. All this gave us plenty of 
exercise. 

On that particular day, which is as fresh 
on memory's tin-type as if yesterday, we 
took 17 pickerel, not pike, which averaged 
over 3 pounds each. The lot weighed 56 
pounds on the scales at Mat. Miller's 
grocery. 



BASS AND PIKE IN MINNESOTA. 

I had caught the tarpon, jew-fish, jack- 
fish, Spanish mackerel and other varieties 
of fish, of the Gulf of Mexico, and was anxi- 
ous to try the fresh water fish of the North. 
My first opportunity came late this season. 
I had business that called me to North Da- 
kota and determined to stop a few days at 
Alexandria, Minn. There I expected to 
meet some of the members of the Chille- 
cothe club, at their camp grounds on Lake 
Carlos. I did not see them, as they had 
returned home; but fortunately I had a let- 
ter from Mr. John E. Wait, one of the 
most active members, which put me in good 
grace, on my arrival at their club grounds. 
I had the use of their boats, nets, etc. I 
remained there 4 days and had a royal good 
time; catching wall eyed pike; small mouth 
black and rock bass, pickerel, crappie and 
other smaller varieties. In fact, I then 
made up my mind to stop again on my re- 
turn from North Dakota, which I did, and 
stayed 5 days. Took my boat to Lake 
Geneva, 2 miles from Alexandria and 
rowed through into Lake L'Homme Dieu, 
and on to Lake Carlos; fishing more or 
less at the most favorable places. I did the 
most of my fishing in Lake Carlos. It is 9 
miles long, 2 miles wide and 150 feet deep, 
and is the last of a chain of lakes. Did not 



fish for a record, but simply to catch what 
I could use, and give to a few friends. The 
last day of my stay I told my boatman 
I wanted to fish that day for a record, to 
tell my Texas friends, and he asked me 
what kind of fish I wanted to catch. I an- 
swered, " Wall eyed pike." We landed on 
Pike Bar, and at night we had 52 pike, 1 
gray bass, 8 pickerel and a few other fish. 

Alexandria is in Douglas County, Minn. 
The county has about 200 lakes; some of 
them quite large. On a number of them 
are k>cated club houses. Later in the sea- 
son, they have fine duck shooting. 

In North Dakota, in and around Stump 
lake, I found good chicken and duck shoot- 
ing, but as non-residents have to pay $25 
for a permit, there have not been so many 
hunters there as usual. I was so well sat- 
isfied with my trip, I hope to be able to go 
again next season. 

Levi Lingo, Denison, Texas. 



SUMMER DAYS ON THE CEDAR. 

Waterloo, la. 

Editor Recreation: R. S. Brown and 
R. J. Nickols, with their families, and my 
wife and I, have been on a 2 weeks' camp- 
ing trip, down the Cedar river. We camped 
in a large walnut grove, with a running 
spring near by. 

Caught enough blue channel catfish, 
crappies and big mouth bass, to supply the 
camp. The fishing has been excellent this 
fall, good strings of bass and pike being 
taken all the time. 

We are not troubled with game hogs in 
this section. A game and fish club here, 
with a large membership, makes life a bur- 
den to the pot and market hunters. Prairie 
chicken shooting has been very good, 
though no large bags were made. With 
the warm weather, and the birds staying in 
the corn fields, hunters have earned all they 
got. Rabbits and fox squirrels are plenty, 
and will afford fine sport for the boys. 
There are many quail, all over the North- 
ern part of the State, but sportsmen do not 
bother them; would rather see them in- 
crease, and hear again the familiar call of 
" Bob White " throughout the land. 

N. W. Tieman. 



A DANIEL COME TO JUDGMENT. 

A Tallahassee correspondent of the " Citizen " says : 
The fishermen in the East Coast country are highly 
elated with the decision of Judge Minor S. Jones, at 
Titusville, in the first case brought under the new fish 
law. The law prohibits the catching of any fish between 
June 15 and August 15 with net or seine, or any mullet 
from November 15 to December 31. An offender. was 
arrested in Brevard County, charged with having violated 
the law by catching mullet. He was arraigned before 
Judge Jones, who released the prisoner, claiming he had 
violated no law, as he viewed it. — Indian River Advocate. 

A Florida correspondent sends me the 
above clipping and adds: " By this Florida 
judge's decision a mullet is no fish. Is that 
so? Can you tell me what is a mullet? " 



6o 



RECREA TION. 



Evidently there is some misunderstand- 
ing here. If the arrested party caught mul- 
let with net or seine, at <t time when the 
law pronounces the catching of any fish un- 
lawful, he violated the law and should have 
been convicted. The mullet is not only a 
true fish but it is the most valuable fish now 
handled in Florida. The catch of mullet, in 
Florida waters, is as valuable to the State as 
that of all other species of fishes combined. 
I suggest that my correspondent get an au- 
thoritative statement from Judge Jones, as 
to what he thinks the mullet really is. — 
Editor. 



Inclosed you will find target made by Ed. 
Coxshall and me, 30 yards, off hand, with a 
Marlin repeater. Four shots went outside 
of the bulls-eye, and 2 went into the same 
hole, on bottom edge of bulls-eye. Top in- 
dicated by notch in bulls-eye. Each man 
took 8 shots, each losing 2 shots outside of 
bulls-eye. 

I am 51 years old and Mr. Coxshall is 26. 
How does this target average with others 
you get? 

J. W. Griffith, Randolph, Wis. 



STUDYING WESTERN FISHES. 

Goose Lake, Oregon. 

Editor Recreation: We are now in 
camp on the East shore of Goose lake, at 
the California-Oregon state line. I shall 
not take time, now, to tell you about the 
excellent fishing and the many things of 
interest connected with this trip. These 
things can be best written about after the 
completion of the summer's work. The 
journey out, from Washington, was pleas- 
ant, in every way, and we regard ourselves 
as fortunate in the route selected, viz: Bal- 
timore & Ohio Railway, Washington to 
Chicago; Chicago & Northwestern to 
Council Bluffs,; Union Pacific (the World's 
pictorial line), to Ogden, and the Southern 
Pacific thence to Ashland, Oregon. 

The service on each of these roads is 
superb, in every way. " The Fast Mail " 
from Omaha is scarcely inferior to " The 
Overland Limited," so justly celebrated for 
the elegance of its appointments and the 
comfort with which the traveller can make 
the trip across the Continent. On nearing 
San Francisco a lady passenger, with a little 
child, said: " How easy it has been to 
make this long trip! I feel as rested and 
comfortable as on the day we left Chicago." 
And so it was with all of us. A trip to the 
Pacific coast need be dreaded by no one. 

At Ashland we outfitted with 2 wagons 
and complete camping and collecting out- 
fits. The object is to examine, carefully, 
all the lakes and streams lying East of the 
Klamath lakes, in Southern Oregon. 

These are Goose lake, the Warner lakes, 
Albert, Summer and Silver lakes. 

It is the purpose to thoroughly explore 



these lakes, along all lines which have any 
bearing upon fish-life. Numerous sound- 
ings will be made and the depth of water 
and character of bottom determined. 
Temperatures of the water will be taken, at 
different times, at different places and at 
different depths. 

The chemical character of the water will 
be determined, and the abundance and dis- 
tribution of the various species of fishes and 
other animals and plants found in the lakes 
will be considered.. Large collections will, 
of course, be made. 

This region has never before been inves- 
tigated, and we shall not be surprised if a 
number of new and interesting fishes are 
found. 

I had occasion last year to mention, in 
Recreation, the remarkably large trout of 
Upper Klamath lake. The more one sees 
of this trout the more certain is he that it 
has not its equal anywhere. That it took 
Mr. Gifford Pinchat i$4 hours to kill a 
large one, in Pelican bay, last fall, is suffi- 
cient to attest its game qualities. Not all 
individuals are so gamey as was that one, 
but many are; while the abundance and 
size of the trout make this lake one of the 
very best places for the angler who desires 
to test his skill with big fish. 

Pelican bay (an arm of Upper Klamath 
lake) is the most prolific in animal life of 
any lake I know of. Crustaceans, mollusks, 
and small fishes abound, in marvellous 
numbers, and constitute an abundant food 
supply for the trout. There is now a com- 
fortable hotel on Pelican bay and there are 
plenty of good boats. Pelican bay is easily 
reached by wagon road, 45 miles from Ash- 
land, on the Southern Pacific. Fishing is 
good at any time, from March to Novem- 
ber. B. W. Evermann. 



Fishermen say fishing in the river is better than for a lorg 
time past. The frost has driven the bass to deep water 
and the unusual absence of insects, on which they feed, 
causes them to bite freely. The landlord of the Coolbaugh 
Hotel, at Laceyville, says one man caught, with 5 rods, on 
Saturday, 700 bass. — Luzerne, Pa., paper. 

If this report be true, or if this man 
caught even 100 bass, then Landlord Cool- 
baugh would confer a favor on all decent 
anglers by posting the name of the man 
on his hotel bulletin, as a genuine fish hog. 
— Editor. 



Deputy Fish Commissioner John J. Hil- 
debrandt, of Logansport, Ind., recently 
captured a seine in the possession of John 
Eller, of Monticello, whom it cost $24.05 
to settle with the state for violating the fish 
law. 



Fishing is no good here thus far. We are 
having rain every day and the brooks and 
rivers are bank full, all the time. 

H. H. Clark, East Angus, Quebec. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



AS TO 25 CALIBRE RIFLES. 

Abilene, Tex. 

Editor Recreation: Replying to query 
from J. M. Miller, in September Recrea- 
tion; I believe the 25-36 Marlin one of the 
best cheap guns made, and prefer it to the 
25-35 Winchester, though that is also a 
good gun. My remarks on reloading will 
apply to either gun. Both will use high or 
low pressure smokeless or black powders, 
but with the latter require frequent clean- 
ing. 

The shells are hard to clean after using 
black powder, but I find low pressure 
smokeless as accurate as black, and it does 
not foul shells or gun. My only objection 
to smokeless is its high price. 

Am reloading with Du Pont's No. 1 
Smokeless, and cast bullets, with excellent 
results. In the factory cartridge, the bullet 
is metal patched, but the shells can be re- 
loaded with smokeless or black powder, 
and cast bullets, if the bullets are properly 
made. 

The twist in these guns is 1 in 12 inches. 
A more rapid twist will not shoot cast bul- 
lets accurately. Do not use a pure lead bul- 
let. These guns require a hard bullet, not 
softer than 1 part tin to 10 of lead. If softer 
they will strip. 

I consider the Ideal No. 6 reloading tool, 
the best in use; but it crimps too tightly 
over the bullet, if the shell is pushed to the 
shoulder. Increasing the crimp is equiva- 
lent to increasing the powder charge, and 
shells that have been reloaded several times 
are likely to burst if too tightly crimped. 
The 1 to 10 bullet is almost as accurate as 
the metal-cased, under 400 yards. 

A friend of mine, on his first trip with a 
25-36 Marlin, reloaded shells and cast bul- 
lets, killed 2 antelope at what was estimated 
to be 500 yards. He did not raise his rear 
sight, but making allowance for distance, 
by the elevation of his front sight, and aim- 
ing at top of shoulder, he hit one antelope 
in the shoulder, and the other in the neck. 

For small game and short range shoot- 
ing I use a light charge, and fill space be- 
tween powder and bullet with cotton. 

One advantage these guns have, over 
those of larger calibre, is their flat trajec- 
tory, making it unnecessary to calculate 
distances accurately. Their killing power 
is surprising, being far greater than that of 
a 32-40. With high pressure smokeless 
powder, and metal-cased bullets, they are 
accurate up to 1,000 yards. 

If Mr. Miller buys a 25-36 Marlin, with 
Lyman combination rear, and ivory bead 
front sight, he will not regret it. 

S. R. Cates. 



REVOLVER CARTRIDGES. 

Trumansburg, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: In the November 
Recreation, Lindley D. Hubbell, asks in- 
formation in regard to the 38-40 and 44-40 
cartridge in the revolver. 

While I am not an expert shot, I have 
had considerable experience with the 44- 
40 in a target revolver, and in my opinion 
it is inferior to the 44 Russian cartridges, in 
every respect. 

The recoil is heavy, and the large powder 
charge fouls the barrel rapidly. 

On a warm dry day this fouling is especi- 
ally troublesome, and so adhesive that 
nothing short of a wire brush will remove 
it, and even then it takes considerable time. 

I have used in this revolver, with fair re- 
sults 40 grains of F F G Dupont's powder, 
ar^d a 44 Russian bullet, of 255 grs. sized to 
.424. 

These bullets were not lubricated, but a 
paraffin wad about ■&% of an inch in thick- 
ness was used over powder. 

I fired 10 shots with this load, a few days 
ago, at 50 yards at an elliptical bulls-eye 
measuring 8 by 10 inches. 

Nine of these shots were well in the bulls- 
eye, and the tenth very close. 

The fouling from this charge was not 
worse, nor the recoil noticeably greater, 
than from the 44-40-200 cartridges; while 
the heavier bullet should be more effective 
on game. I received 2 cans of King's semi- 
smokeless F F G powder for use in my 44 
Russian model revolver. 

While I have not yet had an opportunity 
to give it a thorough trial, I think it will 
prove superior to black powder. 

Its price is about the same, 50 cents a 
pound. The recoil is comparatively light 
for the charge used, 25 grs.- measured in an 
Ideal flask. The report is a sharp crack, 
with less smoke and odor than given by 
black powder. The fouling is easily re- 
moved and apparently has no more injuri- 
ous effect than ordinary black powder. I 
think about 28 grs. of this powder of the 
F F Fg size and a flat pointed bullet of say 
250 grs. would prove a killer on game. The 
makers claim it gives a higher velocity and 
from 10 to 20 per cent, greater penetration 
than black powder. I cannot understand 
why they do not advertise this powder in 
Recreation, so sportsmen may know of 
its good qualities and where to get it. 

L. O. H. 



16 BORE VS. 12 BORE. 

I have had a great deal of experience with 
10, 12 and 16 bore guns, and after consider- 
able experimenting with each, have come 



62 



RECREA TION. 



to the conclusion that the 16 is not in it 
with a 12. 

So far as I know, there is no powder, 
either black or smokeless, made to suit so 
small a bore as 16; and until there is, the 16 
will not shoot as well as a 12 or a 10. 

In a 12 gauge, and, especially in a 10 
gauge, the surface of combustion is so 
great, that the powder is more rapid in ig- 
nition, and the charge leaves the muzzle 
quicker than in the smaller bore; there 
fore making a better gun for wing shoot- 
ing, as you do not have to aim so far ahead. 

I have owned two 16 gauge guns, a 
Parker and an Ithaca, both hammerless. 
But the results obtained did not encourage 
me in the use of small bores. 

For use in cover, where snap-shooting is 
necessary, slow powders are a nuisance. In 
this kind of work, one has no time for care- 
ful calculation. 

Then I began to experiment. Having 
long since discarded black powder, I got 
the quickest grade of wood powder — a 
smokeless powder not now made — and be- 
gan to test it. At first, aside from the lack 
of recoil and smoke, it was about as bad as 
black powder. I reduced the charge to 2^ 
drams, and used 1 grain, by weight, of fine 
black- powder as priming, in the best Win- 
chester shell. 

This made a load that was quick and reli- 
able in every way. But having to buy loose 
ammunition and load my own shells, was, 
sometimes, inconvenient, especially when 
travelling. So at present, I am clinging to 
my old lever-action, 12 gauge, Winchester, 
as if not another one could be made. 

W. A. Wright. 

'■ TEMPERING SPRINGS. 

Temperinga gun-spring is a difficult mat- 
ter, if one does not know a good way of 
doing it. 

Get a piece of good spring steel and forge 
it to the required width and thickness. If 
it is to be curved or V shape, before bend- 
ing, heat to a bright red, and with light 
blows of the hammer tap it all over, until 
smooth and black. Leave no hammer 
marks, as they will weaken the spring. The 
light tapping is very important as it forms 
a kind of skin, and toughens the steel. 

Now heat to bright red and bend to shape 
required: in fitting use a file as little as pos- 
sible. 

Heat over a clear coke or charcoal fire, 
until the steel is a cherry red, and plunge in 
water. Polish with emery cloth, and with 
a piece of wire hold spring over the turned 
up flame of an oil lamp, or of lighted paper 
saturated with oil, until it is evenly covered 
with soot. Then hold 3 or 4 inches above 
a clear coke or charcoal fire until the soot 
is burned off"; then plunge in water. This 
gives a good, sure spring temper. 

J. B. W., Carson City, Nev. 



HOW THE 25-35 WORKS. 

I see in September Recreation that J. 
M. M. would like to hear from some one 
who has used the 25-35 Winchester, model 
'94- 

I took a 6 weeks' outing last summer, 
through Yellowstone park and adjoining 
country. I had a 25-35 Winchester, and 
found it a most excellent gun for small 
game; being light, accurate, nicely bal- 
anced and the ammunition reasonable in 
price. We put in one day on Buffalo fork 
of Snake river. 

About 3 miles from camp, we ran into a 
band of 50 elk. 

One of our party had a 45-75 Winchester, 
he fired 3 shots at an elk, all taking effect 
in the animal's neck, but none going 
through. The 3d shot, however, broke the 
neck and the elk fell. This furnished all the 
meat we were in need of, and the other 
member of the party — who had a 303 Sav- 
age — and I, went in search of antlers. He 
found his inside of y 2 mile and had no 
trouble bringing him down with his Sav- 
age. 

The next morning I started for my ant- 
lers with my 25-35. I had gone about Y\ 
mile when I saw 5 elk, but no antlers to 
suit me. 

I moved on down the canyon and heard 
an old bull elk whistle. He was coming my 
way, so I waited. I have had chills and 
fever in Michigan and mountain fever in 
the West, but I don't know what I had 
while I waited for that elk. 

At last he came out in full view, about 150 
yards from me. I fired and the elk ran. I 
know I fired because I found the empty 
shell afterward. 

After dinner I took one of the boys down 
to show him where I had shot at the elk, 
and while we were looking over the ground 
for blood or hair, another large elk started 
down the same trail. We sat down and 
waited, and the elk came and stood facing 
us, about 100 yards distant. I aimed for the 
point of shoulder and fired. The elk ran 
40 yards and fell, bleeding freely from nos- 
trils and mouth. The ball had passed 
through, the shoulder and lungs, and lodged 
in the other side. I have shot through a 7 
inch dry red pine post, with this gun, at 50 
yards. Have used several large guns hut' 
consider the 25-35 the best for all kinds of 
shooting. Use soft nosed bullets. 

Parties desiring a pleasure or hunting 
trip next season, will find Lander the best 
starting and outfitting point in the West. 
Any questions cheerfully answered. 

W. F. Chalmers, Lander, Wyo. 



TARGET PRACTICE. 



The first and most important requisites, 
are a good rifle, and ammunition. I prefer 
the Winchester, but it is a matter of taste. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



63 



In testing for accuracy, never clamp a gun 
in a vise. Kneel on right knee, and sitting 
on right heel, place left elbow on- left knee; 
hold gun firmly to your shoulder, and press 
the trigger steadily. Keep gun well 
cleaned, and cartridges free from surplus 
grease. If there are scratches or dents on 
the bullets, burnish smooth with a piece of 
steel. 

In long range shooting, study the wind. 
A head wind carries a bullet down, a back 
wind, up, and a cross wind, to right or left. 

Just as the sun sets, on a still evening, 
you can see the course the ball takes, by 
watching the steam caused by its friction 
against the damp air. I discovered this by 
accident, and after a little experience, could 
call my shot every time. Try it, fellow 
sportsman, and be convinced. 

H. N. M., New Orleans, La. 



NOTES. 



I have followed with interest the discus- 
sion of small bore rifles, and nitro powders, 
in Recreation. There appears to be a dif- 
ference of opinion, as to whether the new 
high velocity rifle is the ideal sporting arm. 
None of the articles I have seen, made any 
reference to the length of life of these 
powerful weapons. The tremendous veloc- 
ity of the steel covered projectile, must wear 
the rifling in a short time, and cause irregu- 
lar shooting and reduced penetration. Who 
would think of shooting steel shot from a 
shot gun? 

The new rifle is undoubtedly powerful, 
but is it not rather dangerous for sporting- 
purposes, because of its long range and 
great penetration? The other qualities 
claimed for the nitro powders — less smoke, 
noise and recoil — are perhaps not such val- 
uable attributes as they are considered. 
What sportsman would care to use a gun 
absolutely smokeless and noiseless? To 
me, it would be like hunting with a dog 
that never barked. Reader. 



In reply to the query of R. C. G., Mer- 
riam Park, Minn. I beg to say I have 
used the 38-55 Marlin, both with black and 
smokeless powder cartridges, and if R. C. 
G. is intent on deer he needs nothing bet- 
ter. I lived in Merriam Park, and have 
more than a " bowing acquaintance " with 
the tricky and elusive deer of Northern 
Minnesota and Wisconsin. A 38-55 Marlin 
will take the conceit out of a big buck as 
quickly as a 45-90, if held right. It has all 
the range and penetration of the 45-90, and 
is good enough for any man. It has not 
quite the pulverizing power of the 45-90, 
but that is not needed on deer. The smoke- 
less cartridges give greater range, and a 
flatter trajectory than black powder, and 
there is no smoke to obscure the vision. 
Used with the soft-nosed bullet the killing 



power is greatly increased; but sights 
should be readjusted. Otherwise R. C. G. 
will probably overshoot. Do not use the 
" jacketed " or metal patched bullet. 

N. A. C, Toronto, Can. 



Wishing to reblue an old revolver, I tried 
the method described in July Recreation. 
I powdered, dried and sifted some charcoal, 
put it in a pan, and imbedded in it the barrel 
and cylinder of the revolver. I then cov- 
ered the pan, and put in on a stove, leaving 
it there about 10 minutes. On examina- 
tion, I found the steel covered with pits and 
rusty. It was thoroughly cleaned and dry 
when placed in the charcoal. Can you 
point out any mistake I made in following 
the method? 

J. J. Bowman, Lancaster, Pa. 

The above letter was forwarded to the 
Marlin Arms Co., and they reply: "Blu- 
ing requires charcoal to be red hot, and the 
steel to be blued, must also become red hot. 
The process requires skill and constant at- 
tention; the work has to be looked after 
carefully while color is forming, and only 
with the best appliances, and after consider- 
able experience, can good results be ob- 
tained. We advise those who have work 
worth rebluing, to send it to the manufact- 
urer, or to someone making a business of 
such work. We doubt if any amateur will 
succeed in rebluing steel." 



John McMillan, an old and experienced 
hunter and trapper of the Upper Skagit, 
has during my 8 years acquaintance with 
him, been a strong advocate of large calibre 
rifles, and until a year ago always used a 
45-90. I have been using a 40-65 for the 
past 5 years, and 2 years ago, while hunting 
goats with " Mac," I had many arguments 
with him as to the relative merits of our 
guns. He could not believe the 45-90 
was not the proper # gun for big game. 
Imagine my surprise, when on visiting him 
last month, I found he had discarded his 
old gun for a 30-40 Winchester. He has 
been doing some wonderful execution with 
it, on big game, and praises it more highly 
than he did the 45-90. I believe it is the 
best gun for big game, that is, with the 
soft nose bullet, and I shall discard my 40- 
65 for one. My only objection to the '95 
model is the hard trigger pull, and I have 
written to the Winchester people to find if 
that can be regulated. 

I greatly admire the stand you have 
taken against the game and fish hogs, and 
hope your magazine will be the means of 
reducing the slaughter of game and fish, 
throughout this country. 
J. S. Stangroom, New Whatcom, Wash. 



H. P., Chicago, 111. Your inquiry con- 
cerning the browning of Damascus gun- 
barrels, was referred to the Ithaca Gun Co. 



6 4 



RECREA TION. 



They reply, in substance: To successfully 
brown Damascus steel requires technical 
knowledge and experience. The first step 
is to thoroughly cleanse, and polish the 
barrels. They are then treated to an acid 
bath twice each 24 hours, for from 4 to 6 
days; the time required depending on at- 
mospheric conditions. This is called " rust- 
ing," and brings out the pattern or figure 
of the metal. After each bath, the barrels 
are scratched bright with a metal scratch- 
card. The following is a formula some- 
times used for the acid bath: 

Tincture muriate of iron, 1 ounce; nitric 
ether, 1 ounce; sulphate of copper, 4 scru- 
ples; rain water, 1 pint. If the process is to 
be hurried, add 2 or 3 grains oxymuriate of 
mercury. When barrels are colored, place 
in lime-water to neutralize the acid; then 
rub well with iron-wire scratch-brush. 



I notice H. F. Chase's letter in regard to 
the advanced prices of nitro powders. If it 
is a fact that the manufacturers of nitros 
can and do furnish the Government powder 
at 20 cents a pound, why should sports- 
men be compelled to pay 2 or 3 times as 
much? Why we should be charged any 
more than they charge the Government, is 
a question I should like to have answered 
by some powder manufacturer. I hesitated 
long before giving up the use of black 
powder, but after a thorough trial of the 
nitro I found that in all respects, it was 
better than black. I shall use nitro as long 
* as I own a gun and have enough money 
to buy it, but should like to see the price 
come down to a level with our bank ac- 
counts, at least. 

John Sallman, Shelby, la. 



Small steel articles — parts of firearms, 
etc. — may be blued by the following 
method. Remove all grease from the steel 
by washing with benzine, or rubbing with 
clean cotton waste. Put a peck of finely 
sifted, thoroughly dried wood-ashes, in an 
iron kettle. Bury the steel to be colored in 
the ashes, and place the kettle on a stove 
over a hot fire. Watch the progress of the 
coloring from time to time, by uncovering 
a small part of the steel. It will' first turn 
yellow, then purple, then blue. When blue, 
take out and place in fine, dry wood-ashes, 
until cold. 

By this method I have obtained a beauti- 
ful rich, dark blue, perfectly even in color 
over all the pieces in the ashes. 

John W. Bowman, Lancaster, Pa. 



I wish to thank Mr. Minsker, Mr. Peter- 
son, and " 16 Gauge," for their information 
as to 16 gauge guns, which was published 
in Recreation, in answer to my query in 
the August number. 



I should like to ask these gentlemen what 
black powder loads they use, and if they 
found same satisfactory? 

In answer to Sandpiper, Osage, Iowa, as 
to why the Colt people do not advertise in 
Recreation, would say the same question 
has puzzled me for a long time. They have 
been in business many years, and possibly 
do not try to compete with Marlins, Win- 
chesters 'or other high grade arms. It 
seems the same may be said of Hopkins & 
Allen who seem afraid to advertise in com- 
petition with other gun makers. Many 
readers will remember the end of a firm 
who handled their goods, almost exclu- 
sively, and who refused to advertise in Rec- 
reation. 

In my estimation Recreation is the best 
advertising medium there is, for guns and 
fishing tackle. 

C. R. Wagner, Oak Park, 111. 



I see that Mr. H. F. Chase, of Amesbury, 
Mass., protests against the advance in price 
of nitro powder. I heartily indorse Mr. 
Chase's kick. I have been a great lover of 
these powders, but have quit the use of 
them. I can get black powder for 40 cents 
a pound that is good enough for me. Nitro 
powder costs no more to make now, than 
it did a year ago. 

I. M. Gregory, Lansing, Mich. 



Replying to R. B. B. who asks about Ly- 
man sights; would say I have had con- 
siderable experience with both open, and 
Lyman sights, in hunting large game and 
at the target. Would advise him to remove 
his rear open sight, for good shooting. In 
deer-hunting at dusk, it is impossible to 
see any rear sight, and I always turn it 
down and use the bead alone, with fine re- 
sults. Adirondack. 



Will some sportsman who has used 
patched bullets, cast in an Ideal cylindrical 
adjustable mould, in a 30-30 smokeless, 
Marlin or Winchester rifle, please tell me 
what effect such bullets have on game? 
R. M. C, Unity, Pa. 



Would like to know, through Recrea- 
tion, what its readers have found to be the 
best load for a gun choked from a 10 gauge 
breech to a 12 gauge muzzle, using black 
powder. 

J. H. Haxby, Jacksonville, 111. 



An Australian Mosquito-Proof Tent for 
10, 15 or 25 subscriptions to Recreation — 
according to size of tent. Send for circu- 
lar. This tent is light, compact, water- 
proof and insect-proof. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



WOLVES, DOGS AND CATS. 
W. B. PARSONS, M.D. 

In June Recreation I noticed a com- 
munication from Mr. E. S. Thompson, re- 
garding the habit of wolves' rolling in car- 
rion, and his suggestion that it is probably- 
done to conceal their individual smell, to 
the end that animals and birds, upon which 
they prey, may not detect their dangerous 
proximity. While this hypothesis seems 
plausible, it is not quite satisfactory. Dogs, 
almost universally, are addicted to the same 
filthy habit. They, however, are closely re- 
jated to wolves and no doubt both are de- 
scendants from a common ancestry. 

I have seen many dogs, of different 
breeds, and have owned several, that were 
veritable nuisances because of this habit. 
One of mine was a collie, smart and indus- 
trious, but this was his failing and there 
were few regrets when he was stolen by 
some " Kansas or bust " movers. 

Another was a fice — a wide-awake, frisky 
pet — nice and clean in other respects but 
whenever he ran across any carrion he at 
once proceeded to perfume himself. Then 
he would act as though he knew he had 
done something mean. 

On such occasions he was given plenty 
of " cold shoulder " and denied access to the 
house. Still he did not profit by experi- 
ence, for he invariably repeated the dose 
at every opportunity. 

Certainly these dogs could not have in- 
tended to cover up their smell, for they 
were not, and never had been, dependent 
on their own exertions for a living. I can 
only account for their actions on the theory 
of heredity. 

There are other habits of the dog which, 
to say the least, are peculiar and which are 
doubtless of the same origin. One is turn- 
ing around and around, on a few straws or 
leaves, before lying down. As there is 
nothing in sight to make a bed this is no 
doubt another habit inherited from wild 
ancestors. 

Another is, pawing and scratching just 
after defecating, often on a solid surface 
where there's nothing movable, in order to 
cover up the faeces. Cats are more suc- 
cessful, in' this line. Probably nature has 
made an attempt to instil into these so- 
called unreasoning animals, the laws of 
sanitation, and it is not stretching the im- 
agination to suppose that the great armies 
of Bible times took the hint from their 
dumb companions, and acted upon it, by 
equipping themselves with paddles for the 
same purpose. 

Another strange habit of the dog is con- 
suming time in hunting for a satisfactory 
object to urinate on. Any object that has 
previously been used as a " ta^et " always 



receives the preference and the cause is a 
mystery. 

Still another interesting habit of the dog 
is that of secreting food, usually bones, when 
he has had enough to eat. A hole is 
scratched in the ground and the bone 
covered with dirt. I have known dogs to 
have several such caches, in different place's, 
at the same time. 

Here is a remarkable incident. ,When I 
was a boy, our family had a female cat which 
was better cared for than many children 
are. We little folks were very much elated, 
one morning, to find her in the cradle with 
6 kittens. She was allowed to retain her 
quarters, and all went well for about 2 
weeks, when, on returning from breakfast, 
we found every kitten dead and horribly 
mutilated. The mother of the kittens was 
not there, which was quite unusual, as she 
had kept constant guard over her little ones, 
not allowing a dog or a cat to come near, 
without a fight. It being warm weather all 
the doors had been left open, and no noise 
had been heard. Our first impression was 
that the kittens had beeen killed by some 
person, but this seemed improbable. Little 
more was thought of the matter till several 
months after, when I caught an old Tom 
cat in the act of biting and killing kittens. 
This cleared up the mystery. 

On telling this to the neighbors several of 
them recalled having heard of or seen just 
such capers of Tom cats. No satisfactory 
explanation of the motive for the slaughter 
was ever offered. The only possible reason 
was that the Tom cat desired the company 
of the mother, and the only way it could be 
had - ,r as to destroy the objects of her care. 

To any one who has a penchant in that 
direction the many curious doings of ani- 
mals, birds, reptiles and insects are a source 
of never-ending entertainment. It is not 
uncommon for a sow to eat her own pigs. 
We cannot say why, when done deliber- 
ately, but when done under excitement, as 
when great harm to them is feared, we can 
assign the same motive a human mother 
has in killing her offspring to prevent their 
falling into the hands of savages, as has 
been often done. 



WHERE ARE THE WILD PIGEONS? 

Caraccas, Venezuela. 

Editor Recreation: 

In reply to your query as to American 
passenger pigeons in Central America: 

I have sent home for skins of the pigeons 
which are found in Northeastern Nicaragua 
and Honduras. They will help answer 
your questions, while gratifying a desire I 
have often felt to look into this subject. 

I have never seen, or heard of, flocks of 



65 



66 



R EC RE A TION. 



pigeons, of any kind, in Central America. 
This is not evidence that such flocks do not 
exist there; for while I have repeatedly 
ridden from side to side and end to end of 
the republic of Honduras, and have tra- 
versed Nicaragua from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific slope, and from the Southern- 
most limit to its Northern boundary, 
there are large areas in each of those re- 
publics which I have not seen. Of Gua- 
tamala, Salvador and Costa Rica I have 
seen but little. 

I may add that while I have spent weeks 
in tramping and in riding, on mule or in 
canoe, through the forests and pine clad 
opens, over grassy prairies and along 
rivers and lagoons, I have never seen nor 
heard of birds of any kind which eat grain 
being found in flocks. 

In those republics wood doves or ring 
doves are found. They are of sizes from 
that of a Baltimore oriole to that of a pas- 
senger pigeon 24 grown. They are always 
in pairs, and seldom if ever seen in flocks. 
They make most affectionate pets, and are 
easily domesticated, as are, indeed, many 
of the birds which we do not think of as 
tameable — the egrets, for example. 

In those countries are no large forests of 
oaks, beeches or of other trees to furnish 
food in considerable quantities for pigeons; 
nor is there wheat, barley, oats or rye. 
Even of rice there is little grown. Rubber 
trees yield seeds on which the pavos, or 
turkeys, feed; but rubber trees are few and 
far between. There are many seed bearing 
plants from which pigeons might get food, 
but they are rarely found together in such 
numbers as would support large flocks of 
birds. These facts would tend to lead such 
birds to go in pairs, or in small numbers. 

E. W. Perry. 



THE DOPING HABIT. 

Oakmont, Pa. 
Editor Recreation: I know nothing 
about " doping " of wild carnivora, and 
cannot remember seeing a cat or dog prac- 
tise so nasty a trick; but surely it cannot 
be that animals, wild or tame, practise this 
to " break scent." That would involve a 
much higher degree of mentality that I am 
willing to concede any animal, but most of 
all, it would certainly be ineffective. All 
accounts of good man-tracking hounds 
mention that no " scent breakers," garlic, 
onions, etc., give the hounds serious 
trouble. Further, I have known foxhounds 
pick up a fox trail, just after a fight with a 
skunk had resulted in their stinking so hor- 
ribly as to be unendurable, and there have 
been many accounts in our sportsmen's 
papers of dogs pointing game when di- 
rectly to leeward of some decomposing an- 
imal. Surely the mere smell of carrion 
could not break the scent for a fairly decent 



trailer, when the essence of skunk has not 
the least effect. The fact seems to be that 
the distinctions and differences in scents, 
are in kind, not in degree. My valued 
friend " Coquina " told me some years 
since of a lady who could distinguish dif- 
ferent persons by their smell quite as accu- 
rately as any hound can, and this is a com- 
mon ability of those of the deaf-blind, who 
possess a keen sense of smell. 

Our inimitable " Uncle Dick " once 
made a bet with the owner of an exceed- 
ingly ferocious dog, that he could go into 
the yard guarded by the dog, and it would 
run from him. Dick mashed up a handful 
of red peppers, wrapped them up in a 
cheese cloth, which he put at the end of a 
stick, and when the dog rushed at him. 
shoved the stick at his face. The dog 
grabbed it — and immediately had business 
elsewhere. Then Dick played double or 
quits, betting that he could go into that 
yard and the dog would follow him out of 
it, peaceably. Dick went home, saturated 
the legs of his breeches with the oestrum 
odor and went into the yard, and although 
.the dog was a bit shy for awhile, it finally 
followed him out, and great was the fall of 
that dog in the eyes of the urchins! Be- 
tween peppers and certain odors a pro- 
tection could always be had from him. and 
his owner's garden, cherry trees, and grape 
vines were thereafter at the boys' mercy. 

W. Wade. 



I see in the October Recreation some 
accounts of wolves and dogs rolling in car- 
rion, etc. 

I think it is done more to drive away 
fleas and the like, than anything else, be- 
cause if there is anything that a flea abhors, 
it is something that has the odor or ap- 
pearance of death. Everyone who lias shot 
rabbits has seen the fleas leave them be- 
fore they were done kicking. 



We don't try to vie with Missouri, but if 
people think they can get ahead of us in 
the matter of raising porkers of the genus 
homo they must get up and hustle. 

There are many people here who hound 
deer all summer, not making any bones 
about it, because there seems to be no one 
who cares whether we have any deer next 
year or not. 

John Johnson, Merrill, Wis. 



I have been quite interested in the the- 
ories as to why wolves, dogs, and foxes 
dope; for foxes also dope. I killed one 
last fall that was covered as badly as any 
dog I ever saw. My theory is that they dc 
it to gratify their love for filth. 

H. M. B. Gaylordsville. Conn. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



67 



YES, RABBITS DO SWIM. 

I was much interested in the article in 
October Recreation, by Mr. McCurdy, of 
Fresno, Cal., on the ability of rabbits to 
swim. It brought to mind an incident that 
happened under my observation some 20 
years ago. 

While boating one afternoon, on one of 
the bayous of the Mississippi, we noticed 
a small animal swimming, some distance 
ahead of the boat, that we thought was a 
muskrat. On coming nearer, what was 
our surprise to find that it was a common 
cotton tail. We could not determine 
whether the rabbit took to the water of its 
own choice, or was forced to do so by some 
predatory fox. We took bunny aboard; 
and landed him on the shore, where he 
quickly disappeared in the bushes. 

Another incident, which occurred in the 
same locality, shows the ingenuity which 
birds of prey exhibit, when necessary, to 
catch their game. It was before the ice 
was out of the river, though there were 
numerous open places of varying extent. 
In one of these was a mallard duck, which 
had been winged by some hunter. A bald 
eagle espied the duck, and pounced upon 
him with the speed of an arrow, but the 
duck was alert, and dove in time to escape 
the cruel talons. The eagle swept on and 
upward and circling again launched him- 
self at the quarry; but again the mallard 
escaped by diving. 

The eagle apparently became convinced 
that he must use his brains as well as his 
swiftness and strength. So, flying to the 
shore he alighted on a water elm overlook- 
ing the field of action. He spent 5 or 10 
minutes in perfecting his plan of campaign, 
and then circling about he darted with the 
speed of a meteor at his prey. The mallard 
as before disappeared in the icy water; but 
the eagle, instead of passing along, re- 
mained hovering in the air, over the place 
where the duck went down. When the 
shining green head reappeared the fierce 
talons closed on it, and the tragedy had 
been enacted. 

Dr. S. O. Arnold, St. Paul, Minn. 



A GOOD DAY F_;R SNAKES. 

I take much pleasure in reading your 
magazine, and although some might think 
it strange, I first read the letters from your 
many correspondents, because, as a rule, 
they are true, full of facts, and I always 
learn something. I raised a litter of ter- 
rier pups this season, and when about 6 
weeks old, let them into the yard for exer- 
cise and noticed them all, one after another 
" doping." On examination, I found them 
rolling on a bit of rabbit skin, that had been 
there all winter; so you see it is instinct, 
and nothing learned by experience or 
otherwise. 



One day last week N. B. Fuller, of this 
place, killed 21 milk adder snakes at one 
stroke of a shovel. This sounds a little 
snaky, but 20 of them were in the mother 
snake's stomach, where they are frequently 
carried for safety. They were 4 to 5 inches 
long. 

I. T. Monroe, North Livermore, Me. 



MEMBERS OF THE AUDUBON SOCIETY DON'T 
WEAR THEM. 

I am naturally sweet-tempered, but the 
self-laudatory address of the Audubon So- 
ciety, in September Recreation, stirred 
my bile. " Doing excellent work for the 
protection of birds " are they? " It is to 
laugh." There never was a time when bird- 
skin trimmings were in greater demand, or 
more generally used, than now. Every 
fashion paper is printing instructions in 
home taxidermy for decorative and milli- 
nery purposes. The ladies have such tender 
hearts. They are dear creatures, and I love 
them all, but am not banking on their con- 
sistency. One lately reproved me for 
shooting a hawk. How could you kill 
the pretty thing," she said, looking re- 
proachfully at me from under a hat covered 
with fragments of a dozen birds. If the 
sale of bird skins is ever stopped, it will 
not be by any ladies auxiliary committee. 
G. A. M., Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Nevertheless the Audubon Society is 
doing excellent work, and deserves the 
active support of all bird lovers. — Editor. 



A beautiful specimen of the great blue 
heron was discovered by my wife, early in 
October, at Winthrop Beach, Mass., while 
strolling with her hostess, Mrs. Arthur 
Young. One of the bird's legs was broken 
and it could not escape, but, true to its in- 
stincts, it aimed a savage blow with its 
beak at one of Mrs. Young's eyes, striking 
fortunately on the bony framework just 
above that organ. The heron was killed 
and presented to the Natural History So- 
ciety, at whose rooms on Copley Square, 
Boston, it may now be seen. 

The bird's beak was 6^> inches long, 
neck circumference 4^2 inches, girth of 
body 19 inches, length from beak to tip of 
tail 3^2 feet, from tip to tip of wings 6 feet. 
Edward W. Wild, Keene, N. H. 



NOTES. 



To the discussion whether rabbits can 
swim, I would add the following: In the 
summer of '96, I was one day fishing in the 
Pompton river. Opposite me was a sand 
bar, extending far out in the river, which 
was, at this point, about 75 feet wide. 
Looking across, I saw an animal swim- 
ming, that proved to be a rabbit. 



68 



RECREA TION. 



It came ashore about 10 feet from me and 
lay down in the sun. I stepped toward it, 
and a friend, who was with me, advanced 
from the other side. The rabbit, becoming 
frightened, jumped over my head, striking 
the water 8 or 10 feet from shore, and was 
soon on the other side, none the worse for 
its swim. Its first trip over the river, was, 
as far as I could tell, entirely voluntary. 
E. Guenther, M.D., Newark, N. J. 



Lt. Col. Young, who, for a year past, has 
been stationed in the Yellowstone National 
Park, has been promoted to be Colonel of 
the 3d Cavalry and has joined his regiment. 
This leaves a vacancy in the office of Super- 
intendent of the park. Many people who 
know Col. Young, and who have visited 
the park during the past season, will regret 
this. He has been a most efficient officer, 
in that capacity, and has proven a terror to 
poachers and pot hunters who hang about 
the park. 

It is said Col. Young will be succeeded, 
at Ft. Yellowstone, by Lt. Col. Morris, of 
the 4th Cavalry, and it is earnestly hoped 
the new Superintendent will deal with 
poachers as peremptorily and as severely as 
Col. Young has done. 



Sergt. Wm. Van Buskirk, who, since his 
discharge from the Army, has been em- 
ployed as a scout in the Yellowstone Park, 
recently brought in to the National " Zoo " 
Park, at Washington, 3 buffaloes from the 
Allard herd, in the Flathead Valley, Mont. 
These animals were delivered to the Zoo on 
November 2d. 

Sergt. Van Buskirk also brought in 2 
wild geese, 8 pelicans and a number of 
smaller birds, for the Zoo. 



Your report of the taxidermist having set 
up the moose with the right antler on the 
left side, and the left on the right, reminds 
me that the forefeet of the alligator are 
wonderfully like the human hands. In fact 
when taken off they would almost pass for 
those of a picaninny. I wonder how many 
people have ever noticed that the right 
hand is on the left arm and vice versa. 

Selden, Fort Slocum, N. Y. 



I notice in Recreation many sugges- 
tions as to why coyotes, wolves and dogs 
roll in carrion. It is probably done to rid 
themselves of fleas. Any strong, pungent, 
disagreeable odor will drive off fleas, and 
the odor of carrion is as good as any. 

Harry M. Church, New Bedford, Mass. 



I have succeeded in obtaining 5 moose 
for Litchfield Park. They have been there 
a month and are doing well. I am in the 
market for more. Would buy 10 or 15, if 
prices are not too high. 

E. H. Litchfield, 59 Wall St., N. Y. 



The suggestion of a Union City, Pa., cor- 
respondent, regarding the establishment of 
a department in ornithology, is a good one. 

The editor's concurrence in the idea is 
to me the best forecast for its ultimate suc- 
cess. Jno. Boyd, Toronto, Can. 



I am now offering a $750 upright piano 
for 200 yearly subscriptions to Recreation, 
at $1 each. Here is an excellent opportu- 
nity for some energetic woman to get a 
high grade piano for a few days' work. In 
any city of 5,000 inhabitants, or more, a 
club of this size can be enrolled in a week. 
Write for particulars. 



I will esteem it a personal favor if you 
will send me the names and addresses of 
all the sportsmen you know, who are not 
3 r et readers of Recreation. 



What else can you give a man for a 
Holiday present that will give him so 
much pleasure, at so small a cost, as a 
yearly subscription to Recreation? 



The banner which you so kindly pre- 
sented our Gun Club came some days ago, 
and I thank you on behalf of the club. I 
assure you the banner is appreciated by all 
the members of Recreation Gun Club, and 
it will always be displayed on shooting 
days. 

F. H. Campbell, Sec, Lexington, Va. 



Accept my thanks for the New Haven 
double hammerless gun sent me as a 
premium for 25 subscribers to Recreation. 
I have tried it and it gives perfect satisfac- 
tion in every way. It is far beyond my ex- 
pectations, and I recommend it to anyone 
wishing to get a good gun for a small 
amount of work. It took me but a few 
days to get up the club. 

C. B. Vick, Seaboard, N. C. 



Teacher — Can you tell me, Johnny, 
which travels faster, heat or cold? 

Johnny — Heat, of course. Anybody kin 
ketch cold. 

• —New York " Herald." 



With pleasure I acknowledge receipt of 
the 30-30 Marlin rifle, just received, for the 
last club of subscriptions I sent you. It is 
a handsome rifle and I have been doubly 
repaid for my time. 

The Marlin people were exceedingly 
prompt and careful in shipping it. This, 
with the Premo A camera you gave me for 
a former club, makes me a fine outfit for 
the woods. 
J. W. Stuchell. P. O. Dept., Denver, Col. 



EDITORS CORNER. 



69 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 

SUBSCRIPTION RECEIPTS FOR 2 
YEARS AND 11 MONTHS. 

Read the deadly parallel columns: 

1895. 1896. 1897. 

January $379 $723 $2,146 

February 256 693 2,127 

March 300 1,049 2,215 

April 342 645 1 ,92 I 

May 292 902 1,596 

June 307 770 1 ,402 

July 345 563 \,\0\ 

August 306 601 1 ,906 

September 498 951 2,223 

October 438 9 6 9 2,586 

November 586 1,054 2,440 

December 652 1,853 

$4,671 $10,773 

The pace is well maintained. November, 
'97 is 100 per cent, better than November, 
'96. Look out for December report. 



TWO FRAUDS. 

I have just learned that N. C. Foster, who 
formerly conducted a taxidermist shop at 
Ann Arbor, Mich., and who advertised in 
Recreation, is a swindler. He sneaked 
out of that town with a lot of heads, skins 
and other specimens that had been in- 
trusted to him, by different people, for 
mounting. He also spirited away some 
hundreds of dollars' worth of goods which 
he had bought on credit. These goods 
were shipped from Ann Arbor to Detroit, 
but where they may have gone from there, 
I have been unable to learn. 

Of course, if I had known this man was 
dishonest, I would never have carried his 
ad. I inquired as to his standing, when his 
ad was submitted, and was informed, on 
what I considered good authority, that he 
was all right. I never carry an ad for any 
man unless I have good reason to believe 
him honest. 

Foster is of medium height, rather heav- 
ily built, dark complexion and eyes, sandy 
mustache and black hair. He kept himself. 
clean shaved while in Ann Arbor. His 
eyes are shifty, and he is not fond of look- 
ing one in the face. He dressed rather 
poorly. My informant thinks he had a 
mole on right cheek, but is not positive as 
to this. 

I learn this man bought goods of various 
kinds, wherever he cculd get credit, and 
that he slipped them all out of Ann Arbor 
clandestinely. He bought, from a firm in 
Deadwood, South Dakota, a large stock 



of Indian work, including buck skin cloth- 
ing, cowboy saddles, bridles, hats and vari- 
ous other goods. He will no doubt attempt 
to sell these goods; or may already have 
done so, somewhere in the U. S., and 
readers of Recreation are requested to 
look out for him. If he can be identified 
anywhere, report him to me at once, and 
to the post-office inspectors, Gen. Post-of- 
fice, New York City, who have the case in 
hand and are watching for him. In fact, if 
the case should be reported to your local 
postmaster, or to the police, they would 
doubtless arrest and hold him until proof 
could be furnished. " Foster " is undoubt- 
edly a fictitious name, and wherever this 
man has gone, he has probably assumed 
some other name. 

Geo. Rcessler, who for some weeks past 
has been travelling through New York and 
Pennsylvania, taking subscriptions to Rec- 
reation and representing himself as an 
authorized agent of this magazine, is an- 
other impostor. Judging from reports 
received from various points, he must 
have taken at least 100 subscriptions; but 
has never sent a dollar to this office. I wish 
all readers of Recreation would keep a 
lookout for him, and, if found, have him 
arrested, at once, and telegraph me. 

He is described as being either a German 
or a Jew; rather thick set,, with short neck, 
full face, florid complexion, a light brown 
ragged mustache and abundant dark 
brown hair, somewhat curly. He is said 
to dress well; to make a respectable ap- 
pearance and to be gentlemanly and busi- 
ness like in his methods. He speaks with 
a decided German accent. He is about 5 
feet 8 inches high and weighs about 175 
pounds. One of his victims describes him 
as being dressed in a light suit of clothes, 
light overcoat and dark derby hat. He sails 
under several aliases. 

He tells the people that Recreation has 
been changed into a semi-monthly; that 2 
handsome pictures, of hunting scenes, will 
be sent each subscriber, and gives each a 
receipt, on a blank made with a rubber 
stamp, which he has supplied. 

I should delight in an opportunity of in- 
terviewing this young man. 



February Recreation will contain a 
thrilling story by Lt. C. B. Hardin, de- 
scriptive of his personal experiences in the 
fight with the Modoc Indians, in the 
lava beds. In the same issue will appear a 
beautifully illustrated story by C. C. Mar- 
ing; also the 6th installment of Mr. Ernest 
Seton Thompson's story of Elkland; an 
account of a deer hunt at Round Lake, by 
Seaver A. Miller; " Canadian Fishing." by 
John Boyd; "A Fox Hunt on Mt. Kear- 
sarge," by E. C. Derby, etc. 

The usual fund of information as to 



RECREA TION. 



where to go for game and game fishes; on 
guns and ammunition, bicycling, photog- 
raphy, natural history, etc., will be found 
in this issue. 



With the December number of Recrea- 
tion, its circulation reached the 50,000 
mark, as predicted at the beginning of last 
year. I have now set my stakes at 100,000, 
and intend to reach that point on or before 
December, '98. To do this I shall need 
the earnest co-operation of all my readers, 
in future as in the past; but this I can con- 
fidently rely on. 

I am having a great many requests, from 
readers, to issue Recreation semi-month- 
ly, and to double the price of it. Others re- 
quest that I double the price and double 
the size of the magazine. When you have 
a good thing it is natural to want plenty oi 
it, and I desire to give my readers as much 
Recreation as possible. I hope to in- 
crease the size of the magazine, to some ex- 
tent, before the end of this year; but can 



years, and everyone, so far as I know, who 
has attended the others, has been entirely 
satisfied with hif 'investment therein. 



I am with you on the figure question. 
Men who dare express their convictions, 
especially if they conflict with old ideas, al- 
ways have a set of barkers at their heels; 
but you are right and have introduced a 
much needed reform, which many will 
thank you for, in days to come. 

L. W. Walker, Pasadena, Cal. 



PUBLISHER'S DEPARTMENT. 



STEVENS SCHUETZEN SPECIAL RIFLE. 




STEVENS IDEAL NC5* SPECIAL. 



This model was designed to meet all the 
requirements of riflemen who want the best, 
regardless of cost. No expense has been 
spared to attain this object. The best 
only do that when the advertising receipts points of the most approved models have 
grow to such a point as 
to meet the printer's bill. 
My readers can material- 
ly aid me in solving this 
important problem. If 
you wish to see the mag- 
azine increase in size 
and interest, use your 
influence to induce advertisers, who are us- 
ing other magazines or other sportsmen's 
periodicals, to use Recreation also. 

I have no intention of ever increasing the 
price of Recreation. It is possible to 
make it much larger and better than it is, 
at the same price, if a large enough circula- 
tion can be reached and if a large- enough 
advertising patronage can be secured. My 
printer's bill is now in excess of $3,000 a 
month. It costs me more than $1 to print 
and deliver the magazine to each yearly 
subscriber. The advertising receipts should 
pay the difference and should also pay a 
profit. Let us see what can be done dur- 
ing '98 to make the magazine pay its way. 
So far as profit is concerned, I do not ex- 
pect this, for many years to come. I intend 
to put back into the magazine every dollar 
it earns. I have no desire to make a fort- 
une out of it. My main object in print- 
ing it, is to do good with it and to give 
sportsmen the greatest periodical ever pub- 
lished, in their interests. Shall I have your 
help. WHERE TO OUTFIT FOR ALASKA. 

In your October number you tell your 
readers how to outfit for Alaska, and 
among other things tell them they would 
do best to purchase their outfits at Tacoma 
or Seattle. 

Tn justice to our city, our business men 
and to those intending to go to Alaska, in 
the spring, permit me to inform you that 



been adopted, making this the most com- 
plete rifle ever made, for the style of shoot- 
ing in vogue among the German riflemen. 
Every rifle is carefully tested, from a ma- 
chine rest; and a 10-shot, 2>Va inch group 
guaranteed at 200 yards, when using the 
32-40 or 38-55 cartridges. 

The barrel is half octagon; stock and 
fore-end extra fancy walnut checked; finely 
modelled cheek-piece, lever of special de- 
sign, heavy Swiss butt-plate, embossed 
frame, double set triggers. 

The muzzle sight is a hood attached to a 
fixed base, with interchangeable disks. The 
wind-gauge movement is secured on the 
Vernier by a sliding bar with screw attach- 
ment. 

Made for the .32-40 and .38-55 cartridges, 
with extra barrels to order for the .25-20, 
.25-21, .25 rim-fire, .22 Long Rifle and .22 
short cartridges. Weight 12 to 14 pounds. 
This rifle will be supplied with palm rest 
and false muzzle. 



Recreation will be in its old corner at 
the Sportsmen's Show in Madison Square 
Garden, January 13th — 22d, and will be 
glad to meet as many of its friends as can 
make it convenient to call there. The indi- 
cations are that the Show this year will be 
fully up to the standard of those of previous 



PUBLISHERS DEPARTMENT. 



7* 



you have neglected to mention a very im- 
portant city in the Northwest, and one 
which offers more advantages to parties 
going to Alaska than any other city on the 
Pacific coast. 

Portland, Ore., the metropolis of the 
Northwest, offers every advantage to the 
gold seeker. Our population is twice that 
of Tacoma or Seattle, and consequently we 
have a good many more business houses, in 
every line. 

Complete outfits can be bought here as 
cheaply as in any other city in the United 
States. I except nothing. Wearing ap- 
parel, boots and shoes, food, boats, sledges, 
pack saddles, in fact anything necessary to 
complete an outfit. We have a steamship 
line running direct to Dyea every 16 days, 
and in the spring shall have one, if not 2 
new lines. 

E. S. Morgan, Portland, Ore. 



graphs, eggs, arrow heads, etc., with some 
of the readers of Recreation. 

E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Tex. 



CALIFORNIA PERSONALLY CONDUCTED 
TOURIST EXCURSIONS. 

The Lehigh Valley Railroad has inau- 
gurated a through tourist car service to 
California and Colorado points, leaving 
Philadelphia and points in Pennsylvania 
and New* York State every Wednesday. 
The route of this tourist car has been se- 
lected through the most picturesque re- 
gions of America, including such beauty 
spots as Niagara Falls, the St. Clair Tunnel, 
over the Great Rock Island Route, through 
the Royal Gorge, the Grand Canon, over 
the Rocky Mountains to Salt Lake City, 
along the shores of the Great Lake, to Og- 
den, and over the Sierra Nevadas to the 
principal cities of sunny California — Sacra- 
mento, San Francisco, Los Angeles and 
San Diego. 

For particulars as to time of trains, rates, 
etc., inquire of ticket agents, or address 
Charles S. Lee, General Passenger Agent, 
Lehigh Valley R.R., Philadelphia, Pa. 



BUSINESS NOTICES. 

A few months ago I decided to increase 
my supply of reading matter, and so wrote 
for sample copies of a dozen or more 
sportsmen's periodicals, including Recrea- 
tion. In looking them over the picture 
on the cover of August Recreation, " A 
fresh Supply of Venison," caught my eye 
and caused me to drop everything else. 
After reading that copy of Recreation I 
was simply jubilant, for I knew I had at 
last found what I had long been looking 
for, a real sportsman's magazine, edited 
and managed by a true and experienced 
sportsman. I at once subscribed for Rec- 
reation and shall take it as long as it is 
kept at its present high standard. 

I should like to exchange amateur photo- 



All sportsmen know the value of a good 
boat, and are interested in the latest de- 
velopments of the makers. Everyone who 
visits the Fourth Annual Sportsman's Ex- 
position in .Madison Square Garden, Jan- 
uary 13th to 22d, will find lots to interest 
in the exhibition of punts, boats, yachts, 
and vapor launches. It will be the most 
extensive display ever brought together at 
one time in New York, or in fact in any 
place. From the cheaper models to the 
expensive ones, that run into thousands 
of dollars, will be shown. The sight of 
these alone will be worth a visit. 



The Southern Ry. Co. puts out a pam- 
phlet giving detailed .nformation as to the 
prospects for quail shooting in the territory 
alorg its line, during the present winter. 
There are separate reports from almost 
every station on the line of that road, 
signed by the local agents. This enables a 
prospective; tourist to correspond direct 
with the agents of the road and get exactly 
the information he may be in want of. A 
copy of the pamphlet can be had by ad- 
dressing Alex. A. Thweatt, E.P.A., 271 
Broadway, New York. 



The pilot boat " Thos. S. Negus." having 
on board Capt. McClure. John Schaffer, 
Arthur Boyle and Chas. Carleton, of New 
Haven, and John Adams, of Fordham 
Heights, N. Y., John E. Melville, Meriden, 
and John Beck, of Tyler City, Conn.. Por- 
ter Rhodes, West Haven, and John Perry, 
San Francisco, sailed from New Haven 
November 3d for the Klondike. The en- 
tire party was outfitted with Johnson Sleep- 
ing Bags, Squires' Siberian Moose Shoes, 
and with Fur Clothing from the sporting 
goods establishment of Henry C. Squires 
& Son, 20 Cortlandt Street, N. Y. This is 
only one of several such expeditions that 
have been outfitted by Squires & Son. 



I am glad to see the advertisement of 
Ellwood E. Huebner, of Detroit, Mich., in 
Recreation. Mr. Huebner is a practical 
furrier: he has made for me, robes, rugs 
and ladies' garments, from raw furs. His 
work is first class and his prices reasonable. 
I make this statement unsolicited, for the 
benefit of sportsmen who have furs and 
who want them made into useful articles. 
Geo. Hayden, Jacksonville, 111. 



The Overman Wheel Co., Chicopee 
Falls, Mass., is sending out its desk pad 
calendar for '98. You can get one for 4 2 
cent stamps. 



BICYCLING. 



A FRIGHTFUL HEADER. 

OKRIN D. BARTLETT. 

Only those who live or have camped at 
great altitudes, among the grand old moun- 
tains, can appreciate the inspiring beauty 
of a summer morning in the Susquehanna 
hills. 

Such a morning was selected by my 
friend and me for our memorable trip to a 
neighboring town, several miles down the 
valley. 

The village for which we were destined 
is on the Eastern bank of the river, as is 
also Wyalusing, the historic borough from 
whence we journeyed. 

In order to reach Laceyville, we were 
obliged to traverse a rough, mountainous 
road, crooked, stony, and intersected by 
numerous small ditches, made to prevent 
the heavy rains from cutting channels in 
the road. These drains, however, had failed 
of their purpose, judging from tk^ condi- 
tion in which we found the road. 

The fragrant morning air and the bright 
sunshine cheered our hearts as we mounted 
our wheels and sped away, with the en- 
thusiasm of young Indians. 

Past green meadows, shady groves, and 
by swiftly speeding brooks, we flew, that 
rippled and played in the sunlight as if 
they too felt the delicious contagion of the 
glorious morning. On and on we sped, 
vieing with each other in friendly rivalry 
of strength, until many miles were covered 
and we had reached the foot of Brown- 
town mountain, where a long, tedious 
walk confronted us. Here we leaned our 
steeds against a rail fence and asked the 
owner of the old house if we might trouble 
him for a drink of water, when out trotted 
a flaxen haired, barefoot girl, with a tin 
clipper filled with sparkling, almost ice- 
cold water, from a spring that flowed from 
the base of a large rock. 

After a 15 minute rest, we set out to 
climb the mountain. Only 2 wheelmen, to 
our knowledge, had ever claimed to have 
ridden up this grade, and as there existed 
a strong but unacknowledged rivalry be- 
tween them and us, we determined to make 
a desperate effort to ride to the top; and 
so, mounting once more we followed the 
winding mountain path toward the sum- 
mit, occasionally stopping for a breath.. 

Our hearts were beating like trip-ham- 
mers, from the terrible exertion; but with 
dogged determination and an immense ex- 
penditure of muscular force we finally 
landed at the top of the long hill. Then we 
dropped on a grassy mound, which was as 
welcome as a feather bed to a sleepy boy. 
Here we gave our aching limbs and winded 
lungs an opportunity to recover their 



wonted vigor. Then we remounted and 
bowled along through the picturesque 
farming country, on the tableland, drink- 
ing in the beauties of rural life, until we be- 
gan the descent of the mountain. 

Here we started out on a hot brush. 
Away we sped like the wind, alternately 
gaining or losing on each other. Our in- 
nate love of competition was fully awak- 
ened, and we scarcely thought of the danger 
we incurred. The narrow mountain road 
gave hardly room for 2 wagons to pass, 
and was becoming steeper at every turn. 

Looking down the precipitous moun- 
tain side, at our right, .we could see the 
river and the rail road nearly a mile below; 
while on the upper side a deep ditch ran 
parallel with the road bed. 

Hotter and hotter became the pace. I 
was in the lead, glorying in the thought of 
having my chum behind. 

Lying flat on my machine and keeping 
a sharp outlook for stones and ditches (for 
I knew what it would mean to strike an 
obstruction while going at that terrific 
speed) I glanced along an unusually 
smooth stretch of road and saw a sight 
that made my heart stop dead still with a 
painful thump. My teeth snapped together 
like a steel trap; for only a few feet ahead, 
squarely in my course was a deep hole, cut 
by repeated plunges of heavily loaded 
wheels. It could not be seen until so close 
that escape was impossible. 

Stiffening every muscle for the inevita- 
ble shock, and fully expecting to be dashed 
into the abyss below, there first came a 
quick dropping sensation; then a violent 
lifting jolt and I seemed to be flying in the 
air. In fact I was flying; for, as I after- 
ward learned, my' wheel made a jump of 
over 16 feet, before again touching the 
ground. 

As it struck the road again, still right 
side up, something appeared at my left 
shoulder and the next instant our 2 ma- 
chines crashed together with terrific force. 
Amid a smashing, grinding, snapping 
noise, and a cloud of dust, we slid 30 or 40 
feet, and gradually came to a stop. 

We were twisted and locked together like 
Siamese twins. My arm was around the 
Professor's neck, and my leg through, his 
rear wheel. He was wound up in both ma- 
chines in such a way that it took several 
minutes to pull him out. 

A sharp sting here and there admonished 
us of several cuts and bruises and of several 
patches of missing epidermis. 

After extricating ourselves from our bent 
and broken steeds, which were so badly 
.twisted together that we had to unscrew 
some of the nuts, in order to separate them, 
we both stenned back, folded out arms and 



7- 



BICYCLING. 



73 



with blanched faces surveyed the wreck of 
our pets. We cared little for our own cuts 
and bruises, and neither spoke a word, for 
some seconds. Then my friend broke the 
silence by remarking that " that was a 
corker " ; in which opinion I fully con- 
curred. 

After picking up our hats, tools and other 
debris and repairing our machines so we 
could trundle them — we limped down to 
Laceyville, about 3 miles distant, where we 
crated our wheels and shipped them to the 
makers. Hereafter, when tempted to 
scorch down a mountain road we will get 
off and walk. 



THE RACER'S PRAYER. 



I. N. GREENE. 



Forward, roll forward, oh wheel in your 

flight, 
Make me a scorcher, please, just out of 

sight; 
Faster than " Zimmy " who's speed I adore, 
Swifter than all who win races galore. 
Smooth from my pathway each puncturous 

snare, 
So that the wind will stay safely in there, 
And tho' my path be both rugged and steep, 
Help me, oh wheel, to keep, help me to 

keep, 
Help me to come out ahead of the heap. 



NEW ENGLAND NOTES. 

Even in this changeable climate of New 
England there are many days, and even 
weeks, during winter, when cycle rides are 
not only possible but pleasureable, if the 
rider be properly clad and mounted. 

By the latter I mean that you should be 
on a wheel whose maker has a conscience; 
so that your life may be reasonably safe; 
that the tires should be of first class make, 
and not inflated too hard; for hard tires, on 
frozen and rutty roads, make a terrible 
combination against the nerves. 

For winter riding I cannot get too much 
spring under my saddle. For this reason 
I continue the use of the old Kirkpatrick 
hammock that was, I think, made by Gar- 
ford, many years ago. The average mod- 
ern saddle bangs and kicks the rider, on a 
rough road, so that there is no comfort in 
riding; and produces more " frenzied ex- 
pressions " than are pleasant to see. 

The several wheels used at " Brook- 
house " never know what it means to be 
laid up for the winter. They are always 
ready for the daily run to town, to the stu- 
dio, or, the drop-frame ones, on shopping 
and calling trips. When warmly clad some 
of our most delightful rides have been 
taken on a hard, frozen road, during the 
winter months; for it is then we most need 
out-door exercise. The rider not only feels 



better for the ride, but he saves time and 
car fare, and breathes no coal gas, with 
which the average railway car seems heated. 

As you, dear Novice, acquire experience 
and age you will incline toward lower gears, 
having learned that high speed is not all 
the pleasure or profit there is in cycling, 
and that " the boiled-lobster face and 
petered-out condition " at the end of a ride, 
do not conduce to long life and happiness. 

My friend J. P. Tafft, of Stamford, Ct., 
in speaking of Recreation, commended 
the Editor's scorching of game swine, and 
expressed great satisfaction with the maga- 
zine, as a whole. 

Several of our sportsmen go in strong 
for Ice Yachting, on the Cove, near Stam- 
ford. Among the leaders in this sport is 
Harry Webb. 

It is a dashing pastime, that attracts great 
crowds, and calls for a lot of nerve — and 
photographs. 

Stam. 



A-WHEELING. 



ALMA PENDEXTER HAYDENT. 



When days are cool and fields are sweet, 
The dearest girl I often meet; 
The charm of youth beams from her face, 
And on the bike she's full of grace, 
As a-wheeling, off we go. 

This dainty girl is rather shy, 
In vain I try to keep close by; 
Swift as a bird she darts ahead, 
Or lags behind my pace instead, 
As a-wheeling, off we go. 

Returning when the sun is low, 
And western hills are all a-glow, 
One glance from out her love-lit eyes — 
The road leads on to Paradise! 
As a-wheeling, home we go. 

So hard to take her back to town! 
My Spanish castles tumble down — 
I wonder shall I ever dare 
Ask her my road of life to share, 
As a-wheeling, home we go? 

Boston Transcript. 



Editor Recreation: The L. A. W. Bul- 
letin, of October 22d, has several formulas 
for ascertaining the gear and speed of bi- 
cycles. 

Numbers II., III. and IV. are interest- 
ing, but are not so accurate as they might 
be. I wish to refer particularly to IV., as 
December Recreation has a similar one. 
The Recreation formula is very nearly 
right, but a slight change should be made. 
My correction is based on an average that 
the Veeder M'f'g Co. has found to give the 
best results. 



74 



RECREATlOy 



Let the number of teeth, in forward 
sprocket, be represented by T; and in rear 
sprocket by t. Then the Bulletin formula, 

as corrected, can be written x 4.8 = sec- 
onds in which the pedal revolutions equal 
the miles per hour the bicycle is moving. 

The Recreation formula, as corrected, 
would be: 



Gear 
5.821 



= Seconds, etc. 



Below is a list of gears, with the corre- 
sponding number of seconds. 

Gear. Seconds. 

63 10.8 

66 y 2 1 1.4 

70 12.0 

73V2 12.6 

77 13-2 

80^ 138 

84 144 

\V.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 



Mary got a little bike, 

When to that length she'd gone. 

She likewise wed, that she might have 

A man to hold her on. 

— Detroit Tribune. 

Yes, Alary got her bike. 
And the man to hold her on; 
He also held her up. 
And now her money's gone. 



The guarantee problem is one that at 
present concerns the cycle manufacturer 
scarcely less than the styles in or prices of 
next year's wheels. Some manufacturers 
are in favor of, abolishing the guarantee en- 
tirely, while others favor the shortening of 
the guarantee term to 6 or 3 months, 
and the cycle board of trade has finally de- 
cided on a 60 days limit. 



The old town pump, where we met of yore, 

[s lonesome and out of date. 
For the new town pump at the cycle store 

Is catching the crowds, of late. 



The L. A. W. Consulate desires to call 
the attention of all wheelmen to the fact 
that the American Society for the Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Animals has a standing 
offer of a reward of $25 for the arrest and 
conviction of any person who throws glass, 
nails or pieces of metal on the public 
streets 



The Brooklyn Heights "Railway Com- 
pany is considering the advisability of 
carrying bicycles on its trolley cars. M II. 
Kennedy, the passenger agent of the com- 
pany, has a plan to place bicycles hangers 
on the front and rear dashboards, for this 
pun>< 



" What did that man want?" asked the 
druggist; 

A pint of whiskey." said the new clerk, 
who was on trial for a week. 

'* Did he have a prescription? " 

- No." 

" Well, what did you do? " 

" I wrote one for him." 

" Consider yourself permanently en- 
gaged." — New York " Herald." 



Some makers propose to place 2 rear 
sprockets on their chain wheels next year, 
one on each side of the hub. To provide a 
change in gear the rear wheel may be re- 
moved and reversed. 



" Did you read about that thief who stole 
a bicycle and left a baby in its place? " 

" Gracious — no. I w r ish some man would 
sneak in here, take this baby, and leave me 
a bicycle." 



One of the leading manufacturers will fit 
his '98 models with an improved chain gear 
which he claims will obviate the difficulties 
at present experienced with chains. 



Bradford, Mass., has foot pumps fast- 
ened to the sidewalks, at every corner, for 
the free use of cyclists. " Wind while you 
wait," would be a good sign to put over 
each pump. 



Buffalo wants the L. A. W. champion- 
ship meet, for 1899. and President Field, of 
the Buffalo Athletic Club, has subscribed 
$5,000 toward getting it. 



The advance catalogues of many of the 
larger manufacturers give the price of '98 
model chain wheels, of the first grade, at 
$75, and of the second grade at $50. 



The bicycle is as popular here as at home, 
and American wheels are the favorites 
among the Germans. 

H. J. Burkhard, Munich, Bavaria. 



The cy^le track recently built at Detroit, 
at an expense of $8,000. has proven a finan- 
cial failure, and is now on the market. 



I have received the Ithaca hammerless 
gun you sent me for the club of subscribers, 
and am much pleased with it. Have tested 
it and find it gives'good pattern and pene- 
tration. 

Sam. T. Pearson. Rutland. Yt. 

A Grand Upright Piano, listed at $750. 
for 200 yearly subscriptions to Recrkation*. 



CANOEING. 



AMERICAN CANOE ASSOCIATION 
1897-98. 

Commodore, F. L. Bunnell, Brooklyn, 
N. V. 

Sec'y-Treas., C. V. Schuyler, jog Sixth 
Avenue, Brooklyn, N. ]'. 

PURSERS. 

Atlantic Division, Win. M. Carpenter, 
Main St., Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Central Division, Laure?ice C. Wood- 
worth, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Eastern Division, F. J. Burr age, West 
Newtown, Mass. 

Northern Division, Edgar C. Woolsey, 
37 Charles St., Ottawa, Can. 

Annual dues, Si ; initiation fee, $1. 
Date of meet for 1898, Aug. jt/i to iplh, 
Stave Island, 1000 Islands, N. Y. 



A. C. A. MEMBERSHIP. 

Applications for membership may be 
made to the purser of the division in which 
the applicant resides on blanks furnished 
by purser, the applicant becoming a mem- 
ber provided no objection be made within 
fourteen days after his name has been offi- 
cially published in Recreation. 



AS TO CHANGES IN RACING RULES. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: If there be any 
change needed in the constitution of the 
A. C. A., it is to provide for the formation 
of a permanent committee,, to have control 
of the racing regulations in much the same 
manner as the board of governors control 
the association finances. 

It has been the custom of the outgoing 
regatta committee to recommend, to the 
executive of the Association, that certain 
changes be made in .the racing regulations; 
and for members to publish proposed 
amendments in the association's official 
organ. These proposed amendments then 
come before the executive committee for 
action at its annual meeting, when there is 
so much business to be transacted, in its 
one day's sitting, that the matters relating 
to changes of the racing rules, or to the 
constitution or by-laws, are left for atten- 
tion at the last moment, only to meet the 
fate which awaited them last year, when 
there was a large mass of conflicting pro- 
posals to be acted upon in a short space of 
time, and this by some 20 men, selected, not 



in consequence of a knowledge of the re- 
quirements of racing, but because of their 
fitness to generally represent their respec- 
tive divisions. 

The result of this method of procedure 
has been a demand for many changes, each 
year. Last year the committee unknow- 
ingly changed the old-time maximum limit 
of beam, for the sailing canoe, while in- 
tending to change only the minimum beam 
of the paddling canoe. This result was en- 
tirely unlooked for and undesirable. 

A permanent racing board, as suggested, 
should be composed of one representative 
from each of the 4 divisions of the associa- 
tion, each elected for a term of 4 years, ex- 
cept for the first terms which would be one, 
2, 3 and 4 years, respectively. The mem- 
bers of this committee should be racing ex- 
perts. They should carefully consider the 
racing regulations as a whole, and submit 
to the executive committee, from time to 
time, such changes as a careful considera- 
tion of the matter would lead them to deem 
advisable, after having published the pro- 
posed changes as now provided for. The 
executive committee could then either 
adopt or reject the proposals as submitted. 
Appeals from the ruling of the regatta com- 
mittee would also come before them for 
final decision, which would result in a great 
saving of time at the annual meeting of 
the executive committee, and insure the 
prompt settlement of such appeals. 

This plan, if carried out, would fill a long 
felt want and would undoubtedly stimulate 
the interest in racing, through a stability in 
the rules and regulations which cannot now 
be depended upon for any length of time. 

The proposed programme for the 1898 
Meet, considered as a whole, is far from 
satisfactory. The double blade paddling 
men are at a loss to know why this com- 
mittee has dropped the tandem paddling 
event, for decked canoes, which not only 
has the merit of being an exceptionally 
good race, but has also been well filled dur- 
ing the past. It is to be hoped that it will 
be on the completed programme, as it has 
much in its favor, and seems to promote 
club entries. The argument in favor of the 
tandem single blade event should hold 
equally well for the decked canoe. If the 
total number of events is to be reduced, 
either the swimming race, tail end race, or 
the tournament might better be spared. 

The open canoe has one sailing and one 
combined event. There seems no good 
reason for making a change in the distance 
of the combined event, from one mile to 
V/2 miles. It is the intention of the com- 
mittee to have this event around the tri- 
angular 1^2 mile course. 2 sides of which 
may be covered under either sail or paddle: 



7 6 



RECREA TION. 



but which for the mile and which for the 
half has yet to be decided. Half a mile is 
enough for the paddle and half a mile is 
enough for the sail; nothing can be gained 
by the proposed change of favoring either 
one or the other. It would be better to 
leave the race as it was last year; but if a 
change must be made just for the sake of a 
change, then put a buoy midway between 
the buoys of the second leg, and let sail be 
either lowered or hoisted there. 

In the sailing race for open canoes, event 
No. 14, it is proposed to permit the com- 
promise type of canoe, the one with the ad- 
dition of partial decks and high combing, 
to enter. It is to be hoped that the com- 
mittee will not adhere to this ruling, as it 
is thoroughly unjust to the owners of the 
open canoe proper, who probably outnum- 
ber those of the half decked craft, 10 to one. 
It cannot be doubted that the half decked 
canoes, with their high combing, will have 
a decided advantage in sail carrying power, 
and as they are so few in number, they 
might better be barred altogether, or else 
given a special race. 

Two good events are promised in the 
Hurry-Scurry, and in the Relay race, which 
latter appears for the first time, and in 
which the Regatta Committee again dis- 
courages the use of the decked canoe. 
There is no good reason why a man should 
not have a choice of boats, as he has of pad- 
dles. To make the most of this event the 
men must have a free choice of boats, as 
many clubs may not have 3 open canoes in 
camp. In the tail end race a limit of inches 
should be made for the position of the crew; 
otherwise canoes with long end decks will 
be in demand! 

The Committee still adheres to the un- 
popular turn in the paddling races, to 
which so much objection has been found. 
If one or 2 paddlers were on the committee, 
a change to a straightaway course would 
be quickly made. 

Lincoln B. Palmer. 

The thanks of the Regatta Committee 
are tendered Mr. Palmer, who has so per- 
tinently criticised the proposed schedule of 
events. Mr. Palmer probably voices the 
opinions of many members of the A. C. A. 
The committee desires opinions and sug-. 
gestions from others, on various points. 
The committee is the servant of the mem- 
bers in all matters relating to racing, and 
will do things in the way most desirable 
to the majority of proposing con f estants. 
Some changes will undoubtedly 1 e made in 
tin- schedule. Never before, that 1 am 
aware of, lias Opportunity been offered to 
the members to criticise and SUggesI points 

in the programme before its publication in 

the Year Book, and now thai the chance is 
offered, should the racing men (ami 
"stuffs") fail to take advantage of it. no 
blame ean attach \>> the Regatta Committee 



if the programme, as finally adopted, is not 
satisfactory to all. 

The Chairman will be glad to receive any 
communications, and the sooner they are 
received the better he will be pleased. 

All criticisms and suggestions, with the 
replies thereto, will be published in the offi- 
cial organ, in the near future. 

P. F. Hogan, Chairman, 
243 Pearl St., New York. 



of Racing Regu- 
lations. 



RACE CALENDAR. 

The following schedule of races to be 
held at the A. C. A. meet of 1898, is respect- 
fully submitted by the Regatta Committee. 
Subject to change if found desirable. 

REGATTA PROGRAMME. 

Stave Island, 
August 5th to 19th, 1898. 

Races for decked Sailing Canoes : 

Maximum Length, 16 feet 1 „ , . T 

Beam, 30^ inches See Rule No - " 

" Draft, n inches 

" Sail Area, 130 square feet. 

Event 
No. 

1. Record Combined paddling and sailing, \ mile alter- 

nately, 3 miles ; time limit, \\ hours. 

2. Record Paddling, \ mile with turn. 

3. Record Sailing 4^ miles; time limit, 2 hours. The 

same rig and seat will be used as in event 1. 

The Record races are prescribed by rule 5 Rachig 
regulations. In addition to the Record prizes, a first 
and a second prize wilt be given for each race. 

4. Trial Sailing (see rule 5) 6 miles ; time limit, il hours. 

The contestants in Trophy race are selected from 
this race. First and Second prize. 

5. Novice Sailing, 3 miles ; time limit, \\ hours. Open 

only to members who have not sailed a canoe prior 
to September 1, 1807. First and Second prize. 

6. Trophy Sailing, 9 miles ; time limit, 3$ hours. First 

and Second prize. 

7. Dolphin Trophy Sailing. 7} miles ; time limit. 3 hours. 

The canoe winning first place in Trophy race will not 
compete. 

8. One man paddling, i mile with turn. Decked Sailing 

Canoes. First prize. 

DIVISION RACES. 

These races will be sailed during the first week o! 
the camp, provided they have not been sailed at 
Division Meets. Special rules will be posted on 
Bulletin board. 

9. Atlantic Division Trophy Sailing. 

10. Central Division Trophy Sailing. 

11. Eastern Division Trophy Sailing. 

12. Northern Division Trophy Sailing. 

Races for Open Canoes Under Rule i. 

For one and For 4 For War 

2 men. men. Canoes. 

Maximum Length 16 feet. 20 feet 30 feet. 

Minimum Beam 29' inches 29' inches 36 inches. 

" Depth 10 inches 12 inches 17 inches. 

" Weight 50 His. 70 lbs. 120 lbs. 

Maximum Crew. 9 men. 

One and 2 men canoes weighing less than 50 
pounds may make up a deficiency of not more than 
5 pounds, by ballast. 

War Canoe limitations do not apply to canoes 
built before October 1, 1897. 

Event 

13. Combined paddling ami sailing, J mile alternately *, i\ 

miles; time limit. 1 .'. hours. Single blades. First 
.uid Second pr zes. 



CANOEING. 



77 



Event 
No. 

14. Sailing \\ miles; time limit, i.J hours. First and 

Second prizes. 

In Events No. 13 and 14 the sail area is limited to 
40 square feet. No rudder, or seat which projects 
beyond the gunwales allowed. One pair of detach- 
able Lee- boards may be used. 

These races are arranged for the encouragement 
of those members who have open canoes for general 
use. The Regatta Committee reserve the right to 
rule out any canoe which in its judgment has been 
built with the idea of developing these canoes into 
racing machines. The same canoe and sail will be 
used in both events. 

15. Trophy paddling. One man, one mile straightaway. 

First and Second prize in addition to Trophy. 

16. One man, single blades. \ mile with turn. First prize. 

17. Two men, single blades, i mile with turn. Two first 

prizes. 

18. Four men (Club or Division), single blades. I mile 

with turn. One First prize. 

19. War Canoes, i mile with turn. First and Second 

prize. 

20. Relay race (Club or Division) in one man open canoes, 

single or double blades at individual option. Three 
men from each club or division will compete. Course 
around regular sailing triangle. The starters paddle 
to and turn the first buoy, when they will pass some 
article to the second men, who will paddle to and 
around the second buoy, passing to third men, who 
finish. Three first prizes. 

21. Tail end race. Single blades. Paddlers must kneel 

in extreme stern, facing astern and paddle stern 
first with the wind. 

22. One lady paddling, single blades. \ mile straightaway. 

First prize. 

23. Two ladies paddling, single blades. \ mile straight- 

away. Two first prizes. 

24. Upset paddling, paddles optional. First prize. 

25. Hurry Scurry, paddle optional. First prize. This race 

will probably vary from the usual run, swim and 
paddle. 

26. Tournament. Two first prizes. 

27. Swimming 100 yards. First and Second prizes. 

The Regatta Committee will be glad to have suggestions 
tending to the improvement of this schedule. 
R. Apollonis, ) 

C. Howard Williams, > Committee. 

Percy F. Hogan, Chairman, ) 

APPLICATIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP. 

Thrift Burnside, Deer Park, Toronto, member of the Royal 
Canadian Yacht Club. 

Mr. Samuel Raynor, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Mr. Arthur M. Reese, New YorK. 

John B. May, 272 Centre St., Newton, Mass., of Wawbe- 
wawa Canoe Ass'n. 

John R.obson, Fells, Mass. 

Edward Denham, Union St., New Bedford, Mass., Island 
Canoe Club. 

Mr. Ernest G. Budington, Cranford, N. J. 

Stedman Smith, 87 Milk St., Boston, Dedham Boat Club. 

David Foster, 63 Maple St., West Roxbury, Mass., Ded- 
ham Boat Club. 

Mr. Hobart D. Hewitt, 209 Penn St., Burlington, N. J. 

BROOKLYN CANOE CLUB, NEW YORK. 

Officers for 1898 : 

Commodore : Henry M. Dater. 
Vice-Commodore : Morton V. Brokaw. 
Purser: Jos. F. Eastmond, 68 Broad St., N. Y. 
Measurer : Walter N. Stanley. 

Boat House, foot 56th St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

13th Annual Dinner of the Club, January 12, 1898. 

Club Totem, Alligator. 

Club Colors, Red, White and Blue. 

t A. C. A. Committees for 1897-1898. 
Camp Site : 

H. L. Quick, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Henry C. Morse. Peoria, 111. 
F. S. Thome, Chairman. 



Transportation : 

William E. Harlow, Chairman, Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Chas. V. Winne, Albany, N. Y. 

Louis A. Hall, Newton, Mass. 

F. S. Rathbun, Deseronto, Canada. 

Regatta : 

P. F. Hogan, Chairman, 243 Pearl St., N. Y. 
Raymond Apollonis, Winchester, Mass. 
C. Howard Williams, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Signal Officer : 
Harry M. Stewart, Rochester, N. Y. 

Assistant : 
W. J. English, Peterborough, Canada. 

Committee on Literature : 

Atlantic Division : H. H. Smythe, 3 So. William St., New 

York City. 
Central Division : T. G. Mather, Albany, N. Y. 
Eastern Division : F. J. Burrage, West Newton. Mass. 
Northern Division : E. B. Edwards, Peterborough, Canada. 



OFFICE OF THE REGATTA COMMITTEE, A. C. A. 

243 Pearl Street, New York. 

In so far as it is possible for any base ball 
umpires, or Regatta Committee, whatso- 
ever, to have any opinions of their own, on 
any subject (they being selected on account 
of their absolute lack of intelligence), it is 
the opinion of this Regatta Committee that 
many members of the A. C. A. have ab- 
sented themselves from the meets because, 
wanting to race, they were debarred by the 
expense, time and physique necessary to 
possess, equip and handle the modern rac- 
ing canoe, and by the impossibility of com- 
peting against that creation (which in the 
opinion of the aforesaid R. C. is of no use, 
whatever) with the older " general pur- 
pose " canoes. 

Those members who were at the 1897 
Meet will remember that several men 
brought to camp open canoes, equipped 
with one sail, and a pair of lee-boards, of 
handy design; that an interesting race was 
sailed which aroused the dormant energy, 
and fired the sluggish blood of a lot of 
" has-beens." The lee-board outfits were 
all strictly hand and home made, were very 
simple and at the same time effective. In 
this race the last man (being partially dis- 
abled) crossed the finishing line because 
the Regatta Committee had forgotten to 
take it in out of the wet, and it was in his 
way. He therefore won second prize. 

Now the Regatta Committee proposes to 
arrange more races for this type of canoe, 
because there is lots of fun in such races, 
and there is, in such craft, something like a 
return to the old fashioned general purpose 
canoe, which in the opinion of the aforesaid 
R. C. is the proper caper, and which we 
can all own and handle. 

Now why not get down your old Can- 
vasback, or any other old open canoe you 
may have, or can steal, and stick any old 
sail and a pair of lee-boards on it, and 
bring it to the Meet, next summer? 



78 



RECREA TION. 



There are mugs, and shields and a lot of 
other truck to be won. Why shouldn't you 
break down, come in last and win second 
prize? 

If you have no lee-boards, and can't 
make them, get a pair from English, of 
Peterborough, Ont., or of some one else. 

There will probably be races provided for 
these canoes, with limited and unlimited 
sail, but all will be restricted to one sail and 
the canoe to be steered with a paddle. No 
racing appliances of any kind will be al- 
lowed. 

Do you think this is a good thing; or 
don't you? The Regatta Committee thinks 
it is a custard pie. 

P. F. Hogan, 
Chairman Reg. Com. A. C. A. 



CANOE NOTES. 

The Duquesne Canoe Club, was or- 
ganized here recently, and bids fair to be- 
come a successful club. The members are 
all good canoe men, who take an active in- 
terest in canoe matters, and who enjoy 
paddling as well as the next man. 

The waters hereabout are as good as you 
can find anywhere, under similar condi- 
tions. The rivers are not what they were 
when the Indian and the early settler, or 
even " the oldest inhabitant," sported on 
the bosom of the Allegheny, Monongahela 
and La Belle Riviere — the Ohio. Factories 
have polluted these streams, but such wa- 
ters as we have we intend to use. 

With what canoes we have, and those we 
intend to build, during the winter, by early 
spring our fleet will make a good showing. 
The sport is out of season now, but the in- 
terest is being kept alive. We are receiv- 
ing no end of newspaper notices, and are 
before the people. 

We hope to increase our membership, 
very materially, as well as the interest in 
the A. C. A. Recreation is a most wel- 
come visitor. 

H. E. McLain, Pittsburg, Pa. 



Editor Recreation:. One of the quasi- 
official emblems of the A. C. A. is a knotted 
rope, encircling the A. C. A. Burgee. Many 
years ago a die was made in which the 
rope was not knotted, but merely twisted; 
and year after year this absurdity is sent 
forth on official correspondence. Even on 
the stationery of the officials of '97 we find 
the same blunder. That which purports to 
be a square knot is not even a " granny " 
knot 

Even on the stationery of the Divisions 
we find the same mistake. True an ex- 
ception was made in the handsome cover 
of the 1807 Yearbook. Again in the A. C. 
A. pins we find, knots, lover's knots and no 
knots at all; but few square knots. 



Why can we not have the officials send, 
out a correct emblem, and set an example 
to all others. 

Throw the dies now in use in the sea, and 
spend $3 in making a correct one. 

Square Knot. 



Any member having good photos of 
camps, cruises, races, or anything of in- 
terest to canoeists, and who would like to 
have them published in the '98 Year Book, 
will please send them to me as early as pos- 
sible. 

Illustrations add greatly to the appear- 
ance and interest of a book. I am anxious 
to get the best selection and variety possi- 
ble. I hope the members may take enough 
interest in this to assist me in getting up a 
handsome Year Book. 

C. V. Schuyler, 
Sec'y-Treas., 309 Sixth aw, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



The Atlantic Division will give a compli- 
mentary smoker to the members of the 
A. C. A. early in January. Due notice will 
be given as to the exact date and location, 
by circular letter. The object of this 
smoker is to gather canoeists together, and 
hear what is being done by the officers and 
committees, for the '98 meet. A pleasant 
evening is assured, and it is hoped the mem- 
bers from out of town will turn out in full 
force. Bring your friends with you. 

Thomas Hale, Jr., V. C. 

William M. Carpenter, Purser. 



Members of the A. C. A. are requested to 
send to the Editor of the Official Organ 
notes and items of interest to Canoemen; 
also good photos of canoeing subjects, 
brief accounts of cruises, etc. 



The 2 Bristol steel fishing rods, and, the 
2 Yawman & Erbe automatic reels you sent 
me, as premiums for subscriptions, are as 
fine as anything on the market; and the 
Forehand hammerless shot gun is a beauty. 
It is a good hard shooting gun. and I ad- 
vise any one in need of a- good, reliable gun 
to give the Forehand a trial. Would sug- 
gest to all readers of RECREATION that they 
can secure valuable premiums with a little 
hustling. Try it. 

S. B. KaufTman. Lima. (). 



I received the Cyclone Camera you sent 
me, as a premium for 7 subscribers to Rec- 
reation. Have subjected it to practical 
tests and it does the work in a mosl satis- 
factory manner. 1 am more than pleased 
with it. and thank yon very much for this 
valuable present. I will say a good word 
tor RECREATION whenever I can. for it is 
all right. 

Charles L. Yeo, Battle Creek. Mich. 



RECREA TJON. 



79 



Folding 




\ l A INCHES THICK. 
MAKES PICTURES 1 l A X 3>4 INCHES. 



Pocket Kodak 

So shaped as to go into the pocket without inconvenience, so 
light as to be no trouble when there, using light-proof film cart- 
ridges with which it can be loaded in daylight and withal capable 
of making beautiful pictures 2^x3^ inches, the Folding Pocket 
Kodak is the embodiment of photographic daintiness and utility. 
The shape of the picture is artistic and the quality perfect, 
because the lenses are perfect. These lenses have a fixed focus, 

are strictly achromatic, have wonderful depth 
and definition, and every one must undergo 
the most rigid tests by our own inspector. 
Every lens with the slightest imperfection is 
unhesitatingly discarded. 

The shutter is a marvel of simplicity. It 
is always set and snap shots are made by a 
simple downward pressure on the exposure 
lever ; time exposures are made by touching 
another lever once to open and again to close 
the shutter. The shutter has a set of three 
stops and there are two finders, one for vertical 
and one for horizontal exposures. 

Made of Aluminum, covered with fine 




PUT A 

KODAK 

IN YOUR 

POCKET. 



black morocco with burled brass fittings. 

Price, Folding- Pocket Kodak with fine achromatic lens, $10.00 
Light-Proof Film Cartridge, 12 exposures, 234 ^ 334. - .40 



Kodaks $5.00 to $25.00 



Catalogues free at agencies or by mail. 



No Camera is a KODAK 
unless manufactured by 
the Eastman Kodak Co. 



EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



RECREATION'S THIRD ANNUAL COMPETI- 
TION. 

Recreation has conducted 2 amateur 
photographic competitions, both of which 
have been eminently successful. A third 
will be held, which it is believed will be far 
more fruitful than either of the others. This 
one will open January 1, '98, and close April 
30, '98. 

Following is the list of prizes as thus far 
arranged. Others may be added later: 

First Prize — A Folding Kodak, made by the East- 
man Kodak Company, of Rochester, N. Y., and valued 
at §75. 

Second Prize — $25 in cash. 

Third Prize — A Cycle Korona Camera, made by the 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y„ and valued at 
$22.50. 

Fourth Prize — An Adlake Camera, made by the 
Adams and Westake Co., Chicago, and valued at $12. 

Fifth Prize — -An Amateur Rotary Burnisher, made 
by the Acme Burnisher Co., Fulton, N. Y., and valued 
at $10. 

Sixth Prize — A Baby Hawkeye Camera, made by 
the Blair Camera Co., of Boston, and valued at $6. 

Seventh Prize — 1 Gross Blue Label photo print paper. 

Eighth Prize — 1 Gross Aristo Jr. photo print paper. 

Ninth Prize — 1 Gross Aristo Platino photo print pa- 
per, made by American Aristotype Company, James- 
town, N. Y. 

The makers of the 15 next best pictures 
will each be awarded a yearly subscription 
to Recreation. 

The' contest will close April 30, '98. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures 
or groups of persons, or domestic animals, 
representing, in a truthful manner, shoot- 
ing, fishing, amateur photography, bicy- 
cling, sailing, or other form of outdoor 
sport or recreation. Cycling pictures es- 
pecially desired. Awards to be made by 3 
judges, none of whom shall be competitors. 

Conditions: — Contestants must submit 2 
mounted silver, bromide, platinum, or car- 
bon prints, of each subject, which shall be- 
come the property of Recreation. The 
name and address of the sender, and title 
of picture, to be plainly written on back of 
each print. Daylight, flashlight, or electric 
light pictures admissible. Prize winning 
photographs to be published in Recrea- 
tion, full credit being given in all cases. 

Pictures that have been published else- 
where, or that have been entered in any 
other competition, not available. No entry 
fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look at the 
camera. Occupy them in some other way. 
Many otherwise 'fine pictures failed to win 
in the last competition, because the makers 
did not heed this warning. 



filters and othrochromatic sensitizing solu- 
tions, to get true rendering of color 
values in the photographic negative, 
will, no doubt, be more than pleased to 
learn that Mr. Jos. T. Keiley, in the Pic- 
torial Photographer for October, explains 
a new and simple process, by which not 
only color values but the actual shades, 
tints and colors of Nature can be faith- 
fully reproduced. 

According to his theory, all that is neces- 
sary is to immerse an ordinary plate in a 
50 per cent, solution of the juice of any 
flower one may wish to photograph, and 
expose the plate on a similar flower: de- 
velop the plate, and lo! we have the exact 
colors of the flower. 

In photographing a peacock, Mr. K. ex- 
tracted a fluid from the subcutaneous tissue 
of a peacock, immersed a plate in this fluid, 
and claims to have reproduced, faithfully, 
its gorgeous colors! 

All that is now necessary, in portrait 
photography in natural colors, is a supply 
of fluid from the subcutaneous tissue of 
human beings. 

Of course it will have to be extracted 
from living subjects, as dead ones are usu- 
ally somewhat deficient in color; but prob- 
ably no reasonable sitter will object to sup- 
plying a few ounces of subcutaneous tissue 
juice, prior to a sitting. 

Mr. K. says nothing in regard to the 
keeping qualities of this juice. If it keeps 
well, no doubt professional photographers 
will have on hand a supply of Caucasian, 
negro and heathen chinee juice, for the 
different colored races; and many a man. 
who. to his annoyance, has carried around 
a highly colored nasal appendage for 
years, will now find it a veritable Klon- 
dyke of subcutaneous coloring matter for 
photographic purposes. Many a red head- 
ed girl will also be glad to have her golden 
tresses cooked, for a valuable consideration 
in hand paid, and the soup sold to her less 
fortunate sisters who wear bleached hair 
and who would like to have its true color 
value shown in their pictures. 

Verily, the wonders of amateur photog- 
raphy are great. 

H. D. L., Crown Point, N. Y. 



ANOTHER NEW COLOR PROCESS. 

Amateur photographers who have ex- 
perimented with various color screens, ray- 



RANDOM RIF.LES. 

This is a good time of year for snap shots 
about town. Take out your 4*5 and get 
some winter views of the prettiest streets, 
parks and other spots, while shrouded in 
snow. They will be pleasant to look at 
next summer when the mercury is cavort- 
ing around in the 90s. Plates should not 
be too rapid; as distance is better rendered 



80 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



with f 16; and to my mind nothing comes 
up to good tripod work. Plates need not 
be developed at once, and don't be in a 
hurry when you do go at it. 

Take a few pictures each day. Use 
Metol-Hydrochinon developer, and acid 
fixing bath. The plates may be allowed to 
soak over night, while the weather is cool. 
For a 4 x 5 plate a good soaking dish is a 
y 2 gallon flaring stone crock. Fill it with 
water and place in it the plate, film side 
down, so the chemicals will drop to the 
bottom. A few washings in such a dish are 
worth many in a tray where the plate is 
placed face up. 

How many of my fellow " graphers " 
have negatives, taken while they were learn- 
ing, that were good in all respects? 

Many thus taken are good in every qual- 
ity save that they were over exposed, or 
over developed, thus making them print 
slowly and causing the prints to lack clear- 
ness. Now, during these long winter even- 
ings, no more pleasant occupation can be 
found than taking these over exposed plates 
and treating them to a dose of reducing so- 
lution; or, if very much over exposed, to 
an intensifying solution. In this way we 
may yet get some good prints from them. 

Many amateurs use the fixing bath too 
sparingly in handling solio paper, in sep- 
arate baths. I take a gallon jug, put in it 
13 ounces clear Hypo, 1 gallon water, Yo 
ounce hardener and allow it to stand over 
night," for ripening. No matter how small 
the batch I have to fix, I use a large, white 
wash-bowl and the whole gallon of fixing 
bath, handling the prints from bottom to 
top, rapidly, for full 20 minutes. I use this 
fixing bath over and over, until I have fixed 
nearly or quite a gross of cabinets or their 
equivalent. Keep the solution in the jug, 
and well corked. 



" Combined bath " is a delusion and a 
snare and, to a struggling amateur, a con- 
stant source of regret. It is also harder to 
use than the separate bath. Try the latter 
once or twice, carefully following direc- 
tions, and you will agree with me. 



The amateur who has not the advantages 
of a city home, where he can enjoy the 
luxury of a well regulated camera club 
room, and the associations connected with 
it, should exchange prints with other 
amateurs, everywhere. " Swap " prints, 
methods, opinions and ideas. Write long 
letters and take good advice from your cor- 
respondents. You will learn more, during 
the winter, in this way than in almost any 
other. You may be a good operator, and 
may consider yourself almost perfect; but 
the first exchange you make may give you 
a pointer in the right direction, and may 
shatter some of your pet ideas. 



What an interesting collection of prints 
you can have, in time! I enjoy pictures 
made by brothe ■ amateurs, if good and well 
chosen, as well as those I make myself. 
I would be pleased to hear from all ama- 
teurs who would like to exchange prints. 
F. R. Archibald, Rock Creek, O. 



In spite of every precaution, amateurs 
sometimes find their finger tips stained 
from pyro. 

Instead of wearing the skin away by rub- 
bing it on pumice stone (a method which 
I find several amateurs adopt), the stains 
may be got rid of in the following man- 
ner: — 

Take 7 ounces of hot water, dissolve in 
it 1 ounce of hyposulphite of soda, and *4 
ounce of powdered alum; immerse the dis- 
colored members in this for about 5 min- 
utes and the stains will disappear. 

Bromide prints which are a trifle dark 
may be lightened and toned to a beautiful 
sepia at the same time, in the same bath, 
allowing them to remain in for half an 
hour. 

R. A. T T., in " The Photographic News." 



Karasek suggests the following method 
for stripping gelatine negatives: Bathe the 
plate 10 minutes in a 10 per cent, solution 
of formalin; dry, and heat gently. Then 
coat with a solution of gelatine made of — 

Water 1250 parts 

Gelatine 300 parts 

Glycerine 35 parts 

When dry, the negative should be bathed 
in a 5 per cent, solution of glycerine, the 
damp film cut round with a sharp knife, 
and then transferred to a sheet of glass 
which has been well cleaned with talc; then 
the edges bound down on the glass with 
gummed paper, and, when dry, it may be 
coated with enamel collodion, or negative 
varnish, and then stripped. Old negatives 
cannot be stripped by this method, but re- 
quire soaking in dilute hydrofluoric acid. — 
British Journal of Photography. 



To photograph machinery set your cam- 
era level. Use a small stop, in order to 
get good, sharp detail. Use a quick plate. 
If polished surfaces are too bright, give 
them a dark coat of paint or wipe them with 
a dirty piece of greasy waste. If you have 
not light enough use white cardboard as re- 
flectors; but do not put it in view of the 
lens. A. S. R. 



In making up your list, of Holiday 
presents put down a yearly subcription to 
Recreation, for each of your best friends. 



Mr. L. T. Brodstone of Superior, Neb., 
will exchange unmounted prints with other 
amateur photographers. 



82 



RECREATION. 




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PERFECT 
PICTURES 




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foremost Amateur and Professional Photographers. 



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DIFFERENT STYLES 
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Special Designs for the Sportsman and Tourist 



CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



Rochester Optical Co. 



37 SOUTH STREET 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Mention Keckkation. 



RECREA TION. • 83 



©undlacb 



Optical Co 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Manufacturers of— ^ ; 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
APPARATUS 

THE most IMPORTANT part of a 
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is the LENS. Our lenses 
are absolutely guaranteed. 
Our SHUTTERS lead. 

Our Cameras are unsurpassed in workmanship or finish. 
Our prices are very low. 

The only concern in the United States turning out a complete 
camera, lens, and shutter, all of their own manufacture. 

-Send for Catalogue*** 

GUNDLACH OPTICAL CO. 

753 to 765 So* Clinton Street* ROCHESTER* N* Y 




84 RECREATION. 



Camping 



md 



Camp Outfits 

A MANUAL OP INSTRUCTION FOR YOUNG 
AND OLD SPORTSMEN. 

Edited by Q. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

Author of "CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," '■ HUNTING IN THE 
GREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "THE BIG GAME OP 
NORTH AnERICA," " THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG," 
"AflERICAN GAME FISHES," ETC. 



12mo. 200 Pages. 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



CHIS book contains practical points on how to dress for Hunting, Fishing, or other Camping 
Trips; what to carry in the way of extra Clothing, Bedding, Provisions, Cooking Utensils, and 
all classes of Camp Equipage; how to select Camp Sites; how to make Camp Fires; how to 
build Temporary Shelters; what to do in case of Getting Lost, etc. It contains check lists of articles 
constituting Complete Camping Outfits; a list of the names and addresses of Guides, in various 
hunting and fishing countries, and much other information of value to Campers, and which has never 
before been given to the public. 

The instructions given are based' on an experience of twenty-five years in Camping, and in the 
study of Camp Lore, Woodcraft, etc., and it is believed that the work will prove of great value to 
thousands of men and boys, who have not had such favorable opportunities for study. 
The book also contains a Chapter by 

DR. CHARLES GILBERT DAVIS, on CAMP HYGIENE, MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

ONE BY * 

COL. J. FRY LAWRENCE, on CAMP COOKERY, 

AND ONE BY 

FRANK F. FRISBIE on THE DIAMOND HITCH, or HOW TO LOAD A PACK HORSE 



This book should be in the library of every Sportsman, and will be sent, post-paid, on receipt 
of price, by the Author, 

O. O. Shields, 19 W. 24th St., New York. 
Given as a Premium for Four Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREA TION. 



xvn 



WHAT THEY SAY OF THE PRE- 
MIUMS. 

I am delighted with the Yawman & Erbe automatic reel 
and the steel rod, sent me as premiums. The use of them 
both has made me enthusiastic over their merits. The au- 
tomatic reel has become widely used in this state, but 1 do 
not think the rods are so well known. I have used my 
Bristol rod several times, and cannot speak too highly of it, 
and I have two split bamboo rods, too. It is beautifully 
made, the joints are perfection, and it will last a life-time. 
The first use I gave it was a 2% hours' trout fish on Lake 
Whatcom, and brought home 22 of as fine trout as an* 
angler could wish to catch. 

S. B. Irish, New Whatcom, Wash. 



I must apologize for not sooner advising you of receipt of 
the wheel you sent me for 75 subscribers. After i\ months 
of hard service it is in perfect condition, and my sister 
would not exchange it for any wheel on the market. I 
thank you for not only the wheel, but also for the pleasure 
I derive from reading each number of Recreation, which 
is the best sportsmen's magazine published. I find no diffi- 
culty in obtaining subscribers. One reading of a sample 
copy is enough to convince any man that he cannot afford 
to do without it. 

A. W. Woodell, Sydney, Cape Breton, N. S. 



The Ithaca gun, which you gave me as a premium for 35 
subscribers, was received in due time, and I have now used 
it 3 weeks. I would not take $100 for it; so you may know 
what I think of it. The gun is perfect in every respect, 
and for shooting qualities beats any gun I ever used; and 
I have owned a good many different guns, all the way from 
an old army musket to a $200 Greener. It don't seem pos- 
sible that you can give away such premiums. It is no 
trouble at all to get up a club for Recreation. 

E. B. Stearns, Mitchell, 111. 



I received the Forehand Arms Co.'s hammerless gun in 
due season, for which please accept my sincere thanks. I 
have tried it on small game, both at short and long dis- 
tances, and find it equal in pattern and penetration to the 
best guns owned here. It is also finely finished and fits me 
perfectly, and it would take $35 more than it cost me for 
anyone to own it except myself. Again thanking you for 
your liberality, I am J. E. Hutchinson, Laconia, N. Y. 



I don't know what I would do without Recreation. 
Please accept my sincere thanks for the valuable premium 
you sent me for the little work I did for Recreation. I 
mean the Marlin repeater. It is a daisy. I have shot 
nearly all the different makes of rifles, but must say the 38- 
55 Marlin knocks them all out. It seems so nicely balanced 
that it don't make much difference whether the object is 
moving or still; I can get the ball there all the same. 

L. C. Danner, Wormleysburg, Pa. 



I wish to thank you again for the new Forehand gun you 
gave me as a premium. It is as good a gun as a man could 
wish for. I have just come home from a 4 days' shooting 
trip, and had the gun with me. I gave it a thorough trial 
and it is as hard a shooting gun as ever was made. I killed 
12 ruffed grouse, 7 woodcock, and 4 gray squirrels, and 
from the way in which it killed the grouse, it will take a 
good gun to beat it. 

John W. Ackerman, Fishkill, N. Y. 



Mr. Packard and I have each received a No. II Bristol 
steel rod as a reward for sending you the necessary sub- 
scriptions to your most excellent magazine. We are more 
than pleased with the rods, and I have taken pleasure in 
showing them to a number of gentlemen who have been 
using bamboo rods. They all aver that a steel rod must 
hereafter be parcel and part of their outfits. 

W. C. Shoemaker, Lima, O. 

The Baby Wizard camera, made by the Manhattan Op- 
tical Co. and sent me as a premium, arrived in due time, 
and I am very much pleased with it. For mountain pho- 
tography, it is indeed an ideal camera. 

Wm. Gebhardt, Salt Lake, Utah. 

I thank you very much for the Forehand gun you sent 
me, and am well pleased with it. All the sportsmen say it 
is a good gun, and that Recreation is a good book, and 
should be circulated in every town and city. 

H. Barry, Bristol. Conn- 



The Premo B. camera came to hand in due time. Please 
accept my sincere thanks for your kindness. I consider 
this a present from you, as I certainly did not earn such a 
prize. 

The camera is excellent. I have exposed 3 plates and 
have 3 nearly perfect negatives. Our professional photog- 
rapher pronounces it a remarkable instrument. 

T. P. Bowler, Fonda, N. Y. 



I want to say, emphatically, that the Manhattan Optical 
Co.'s goods are what they claim for them, and that I got 
value received in the little 4x5 Baby Wizard, purchased 
from them. Next year I will try to do better than this. It 
takes a man one year, on a new hunting ground, to know 
how to handle it properly. 

H. S. Garfield. M.D., Pendleton, Ore. 



I have received the Davenport shot gun you sent me, for 
15 subscriptions to Recreation. I gave it a trial on tar- 
gets and in the field. I put the whole charge of No. 7 shot 
in a 28-inch circle at 20 yards. In the field I loaded with 
i\ drams black powder and one ounce of No. 7 shot, killed 
a wild duck at 65 yards. I don't think any gun could shoot 
any harder than this does. J. H. Ruth, Lancaster, Pa. 



Through your kindness, I received the Premo camera, 
from the Rochester Optical Co., and am thoroughly satis- 
fied with it, after a careful trial. Accept my sincere 
thanks for this beautiful present. It is well worth 10 times 
the work and trouble that it was to get it. This is a great 
town for the Premo, and for Recreation. 

Chas. H. Stearns, Mansfield, Mass. 



I have neglected to acknowledge receipt of the Winches- 
ter repeating shot gun, which you so kindly gave me for a 
club of subscribers to Recreation. Am more than pleased 
with it. It is a hard hitter, a close shooter, and a great 
improvement on the model '95, and all other repeaters. 
H. C. Gardiner, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Since you sent me the Marlin 30-30, for 28 subscribers to 
your magazine, there have been 6 Marlins sold here. None 
of them would have been bought except for Recreation, 
and a look at my new Marlin. All those who bought rifles 
are subscribers to Recreation. 

W. W. Worthen, Manden, N. D. 



I received the Syracuse gun you sent me, as premium for 
a club of subscribers, O. K. For good, hard shooting, it 
can't be beaten. It is a close shooting gun, at 40 yards. 
The left barrel put 328 No. 7 shot in a 3o // circle at 30 
yards; the right 261. Please accept my sincere thanks. 
C. O. Rogers, Albany, N. Y. 



I received the Marlin rifle, as premium. It is a beauty. 

I killed a crow, at a distance of 198 measured yards, and 

completely dissected him. The Marlin has no equal as an 

arm. I am more than thankful to you for your kindness. 

Cyrus Brown, Greenville, R. I. 



The Kenwood bag, sent me as a premium for subscrip- 
tions, arrived promptly. I have now no occasion to sing, 
" Cease rude Boreas blustering railer.'' He can bluster 
and rail all he wishes, while I sleep as snug as a bug in a 
rug. L. Allen, No. Falmouth, Mass. 



The beautiful and highly appreciated piize, the Syracuse 
Hammerless gun, arrived by express O. K. about the same 
time I received your letter. I am very much pleased with 
the gun ; far better than I expected to be. I cannot praise 
it too strongly. D. D. Betts, Amherst, N. S. 



I beg to acknowledge the receipt of the No. 2 Bullet cam- 
era, which you sent for a club of 15 subscribers. It is all 
one could ask, and it seems to me your liberality is un- 
equalled by that of any publisher in the United States. 

Wm. F. Short, Jr., Jacksonville, 111. 



The Davenport rifle, which you sent me as a premium 
for 10 subscribers, is a beauty. The longer I use it the bet- 
ter I like it, and every person who has shot with it is loud 
in his praise of its accuracy and power. 

J. H. Couch, Springdale, Pa. 



The Forehand revolver you sent me as premium for 10 
subscribers to Recreation, is all right. Many thanks for 
it E. B. Porter. Middleboro, Mass. 



XV111 



R EC RE A TION. 




(Taken on a Carbutt Orthochromatic Plate.) 
By Alois Beer, Photographer to Emperor of Austria 

To Obtain Artistic Results 

as much care must be used in the selection 
of the Plates or films as the Camera. 

CARBUTT'S PLATES AND FILMS 

(STANDARD FOR 20 YEARS) 

Give Universal Satisfaction 

Also J. C. DEVELOPING TABLOIDS, put up in 
3 sizes, price 25c, 40c, 75c 

If you intend competing for prizes let us assist you 
in winning by the aid of our Plates, Films, and De- 
veloper. For sale by all dealers. Catalogue free. 

JOHN GnRBUTT, jKto^SSh PUladeiiOua, Pa. 



THE 




MARLBOROUGH 



CAMERA 



Reversible 

Swing 

Back, 

Rising and 

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5x7, fitted with the Rapid Rectilinear Lens, 

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Send for Free Pamphlet of $5 and $8 Cameras 

: recommend the New American Flliui for hand-camera work 
Try Metacarbol, the most powerful developer known 

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of all kinds of Cameras and all requisites "„». 
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The International Annual, Vol. X. Full of valu- 
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Price, 75 cents ; postage, 15 cents. 

«fc H. T. ANTHONY & CO. 

591 Broadway, New York 

S 45, 47 and 49 E. Randolph Street, Chicago. 



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The Baby, $6 

Size, 21-2x3 1-2 x 4 in. 

Photo, 2x 2 1-2 in. Weight, 7 oz. 

Loaded with 12 exposures 



Success in 
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is only obtained by using an outfit well 
made, with high-grade lens, and reliable 
shutter. 



The Hawk* Eyes 



manufactured in various styles and sizes from the " Baby " up, can be loaded 
and unloaded in broad daylight, can be used with film or glass plates and war- 
ranted to prove just as represented. 

Why not make your Own Photographs? 

A Guide-Book is furnished with each camera that frAm fj ia cf<lf*f 

will enable the novice to produce good results 1 lU I II L I lC o Id 1 I 

THE BLAIR CAMERA CO., Mfrs. 

22 Randolph St., Boston, Mass. 

113^ Send for Illustrated Catalogue which tells everything 



RECREA TION. 



xix 



Life is too Short 




§A!P0£ 



to bother with slow, te- 
dious, and difficult print- 
ing processes. That's 
why you should use our 
Velox papers. They can 
be used at any time, day 
or night. 



It takes an INCREDIBLY SHORT TIME for 
turning out LOTS of prints. 

NO PROCESS SO EASY and SIMPLE 

gives such 

Artistic and Permanent Results 

SAI1PLE PACKAGES of two dozen Cabs., 
or 4x5, two Sample Prints, and Developer, 
will be sent on receipt of 50 cents. 

We manufacture ALL kinds of photographic papers, 
gelatine, collodion, matt, glossy, Bromide, etc. 

NEPERA CHEMICAL CO. 

Works and Head Office, NEPERA PARK, N. V. 

Branch Offices / Chica g: o < ™-. 2I Quincy St. 
Branch Ufficks } PariS( France! 8 Rue Martel 

J8®=" Order from your dealer, and if he does not fill 
your order, we WILL. 



Here's a reason why lots of life's sunshine 

Is lost in the world's dreary fog: 
There's too many a man quick to tie a tin 
can 
To the tail of an other man's dog. 

— L. A. W. Bulletin. 



Lantern colored 

^^ | • % In the most artistic manner. 

^^ I 1|| £^^ Refers to the editor of 
i^llVIVi^ ''Recreation." 

MRS. FRED. MATHER 
63 Linden Street BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Are you an Amateur 
Photographer ? 



If so, write us for 
catalogue of 



CAMERAS and 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 

SUPPLIES 

m We handle all the best cameras in the market 
including Kodaks, Premos, Hawk=eyes, Koronasi 
Adlakes, etc. 

We also handle all the good plates, films and 
printing papers in the narket. 

We sell 9v manufacturers' prices, and, in manv 
cases, lowei 

Ten per cent, discount GALL & LEMBKE 

from regular prices, if you 2 i Union Satiate 

mention Recreation. NewYork 




CANDLE POWER HOURS FOR $1.00 (One Dollar) 
Incandescent electric light, 1600 c.p.h 



Illu minating gas, 
Gasolene gas, = 
Acetylene, = 



= 2S60 c.p.h. 

3200 c.p.h. £ 
- 67QO c.p.h 



"Acetylene is the coming lllumlnant." 

NAPHEYS' ACETYLENE GAS GENERATOR 

makes a private gas plant absolutely practicable, safe 
and reliable. The only "dry" generator, and conse- 
quently the only one for domestic lighting. Approved, 
adopted by the U. 8. Government. 

J. J3. COIvT «Sto OO. 

Sole agents. Also manufacturers of 

STERE®PTie©NS and all paraphernalia for 

light production and projection. 

New York. Chicago. San Francisco. Buffalo. 

Acetylene Gas Show Rooms at N. W. Cor. Broadway and 

37th St., New York City. Full particulars from Dept. 4 

Main Office, II5-II7 Nassau St., New York. 



MILLEN'S &S*^ STANDARD 

Photographic Specialties 



T^HE NORMAL 

A PHOTOGRAPHIC 

DEVELOPER for Dry Plates, 
Films and Bromide Paper 

<^» PRODUCES the most exquisite detail 
with good strength and printing qualities. 
Does not stain either the plate or the 
ringers, and may be used over and over. 

(S3 

wjw IS IN ONE solution requiring only to 

be diluted with water to be ready for use. 

^0 PRICE FORTY CENTS, delivered 
to any Express Office in the United States. 

Send for full descriptive circulars of our 
Photographic Specialties 



rffo J. C. MILLEN, M. D.. 
fcSSfi^ Manufacturing Chemist w»M^ 
DENVER, COLORADO, U.S.A. 



xx RECREATION. 



IhBaby Wizard 




Camera, 



Is the 

Ideal Camera 



Only 2f x 5f x 6$ inches 



for TOURISTS, WHEELMEN 

OR SPORTSMEN GENERALLY 



Fitted with our Extra Rapid 
Rectilinear Lens (unequaled in 
this country), and the Bausch 
and I/omb Optical Company's 
Iris Diaphragm Shutter. 

Complete with Carrying Case 



$25.00 





Same without rack and pinion, for focussing, and swing back 



$20.00 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Manhattan Optical Co*, Cresskill, N.J* 



RECREA TION. 



xxi 



IT HAS SIMPLIFIED PHOTOGRAPHY. 

A ROYAL GIFT for the HOLIDAYS, 



The 






ADLAKE mm 



COMPLETE WITH 12 METAL 
PLATE HOLDERS. Prepaid to any 
part of the United States for 



IT IS A PERFECT INSTRUMENT FOR TAKING 

INTERIOR VIEWS, HOME PORTRAITS, 

AND FAMILY GROUPS. 

The \(\h]m 

lilUdlllj ^ as V&t finest single achromatic Lens 
that money will buy. The Shutter 
is adjustable for time or instaneous work; is simple and 
certain in action and cannot get out of order. The 
diaphragm has three stops and there are two View 
Finders that find. The ADLAKE takes 12 pictures on 
glass plates at one loading. Standard size 4x5. No 
Extras. Get your plates anywhere. 

Send at once for our free "Adlake Camera Book." 
That tells all about it. Sample mounted photograph, 5c. 

The Adams & Westlake Company 

122 ONTARIO ST., CHICAGO. 

New England Agents ; Andrew J. LJoyd & Co., Boston. 



Interested in FIMHOBS^ x 

seUdfor description or the- ip^ 

Famous 0*I°C* Swinet^ 

TWO OF WHICH WEIGHED 2806 LBS. , 

FffiS? 'APM/CAMT '§£TS 'APAffim ' T/M£ /^V 



We will please you — 

If you will send us 50 cents for this combination 
One large, nickel-plated, Gun-Case Plate 
One 3 -inch long, nickel-plated, Dog-Collar Plate 
One Round, nickel-plated, Hand-Bag Check 

With your name and address on each. 

F. H. COBB & CO., 21 Collier Street 
HORNELLSVILLE, N. Y. 

Mention Recr^a-ton with all orders. 




FREE 

TO BALD HEADS. 



We will mail on appli- 
cation, free information 
how to grow hair upon 
a bald head, stop falling 
hair and remove scalp 
diseases. Address, 
Altenheim Med. Dispensary, 

u Tht crowning glory'of Woman Bept. L.V. Box 779, 
it Her Hair." Cincinnati. Ohio. 




Anastigmat 



Lenses 



Made by C. P. GOERZ 
in Berlin 

Surpass all others for 

Speed and Definition 

Price-list and Test-chart free on application to 

C. P. GOERZ, 52U te n w S v q o u r r' B - 



XX11 



RECREA TION. 




•WATSbTs 



" T believe he is full nearly all the time." 
' Yes, indeed, he keeps his family busy bailing him out.' 



Anglers have recently been having some 
very good sport at Cataiina Island and 
mackerel are biting well at Redondo. Some 
very large ones arc being taken by the 
many anglers that frequent the pier, daily. 

Yacht racing is now attracting the at 
tention of the yacht owners, and some good 
races have been sailed, between the crack 
yachts, off Terminal island. Thousands of 
enthusiastic admirers of the sport go down 
to witness each race. 

B. C Ilinman, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Editor Recreation: In 2 hours' fishing 
I caught, with my Bristol steel rod. in the 
Somo river, near this place, 15 pike that 
weighed 45 pounds. People looking for 
good fishing and hunting, and elegant hotel 
accommodations, can find them here. 

George Hall, Tomahawk. Wis. 



1 have been a reader of RECREATION sev- 

eral months, and greatly admire the man- 
ner in which it is conducted, and the select 
quality of its reading matter. 

A Lloyd Lucas, Mansfield, Mass. 



RECREA TION. 



xxm 



Not Cheap Flies, 

But GOOD Flies. 

Artificial flies of my manufacture are war- 
ranted not to fall apart nor whip to pieces. 
I get fair prices for these flies. Sample and 
full particulars for 10 cents stamps or silver, 

E. G. CHATFIELD, 
Not Oswego. 49 Front St., Owego, N. Y. 




THE BEST sport to be found in 
Florida ; Creek Navigation, from 
the Lake Region to the Everglades. 

Write, and come to 
CARSON BROS., Frostproof, Florida 




LYMAN'S RIFLE SIGHTS. 

Send for 96 Page Catalogue of 

Sights ami Fine Shooting Rifle; 

WILLIAM LYMAN, Middlefield, Conn 



^INE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 
BIRDS, ETC., for sale at unheard-of prices. 
Send 10 cents for photos. 

JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine. 




m#mmmw 



The Standard of 
the World. 




Dr. Jaeger's 

SANITARY UNDERWEAR 

allows the skin to breathe freely, 
at the same time absorbing its 
exhalations, leaving the body- 
dry and warm. 

Dr. Jaeger Underwear gives 

greatest warmth with the 

least weight. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 
MaiL Retail Store 

16 W. 23d St. 

NEW YORK 




Branches 3 "6 Broadway 

/248 W. I25taSt. 



immmmmwm 




Popular Pease Pianos 



NEARLY 60,000 IN USE 



q^" l^r* Q^" 

Unequalled 

in 

Tone 





VjM 



1£T* QgF* t2?* 



Beautiful 

in 

Finish 



i2r* t2r* *2s* 



SEND FOR SOUVENIR CARD PIANO-FREE 




PEASE PIANO CO. 



316-322 West 43d Street 
New York City 



PftZ 




XXIV 



RECREA TION. 




AN OLD TIMER'S 

Ten days' emergency rations for ioo men, and the hospital supplies that are supposed 



VVWWVWV > ^ » S S '»V^»»*^»* ^ » S *^*»*»V*»S*'NNN»S>^^ 




FOURTH ANNUAL 

Sportsmen's 

Exposition 

Bicycle Sfiow, 



UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THB 

National 
Sportsmen's Association 



ana 



Madison Square Garden, New York, 

JANUARY 13 to 22, 1898. 

Educational Exhibit of Sportsmen's Equipments and Appliances. 
Bicycles and Bicycle Sundries. Fly Casting, Shooting, 
Bowling and other Contests. Live Specimens of 
Wild Game, Birds and Fish. 

Apply at once for diagrams, application blanks, and particulars, to 
Secretary, FRANK W. SANGER, 

P. O. Box 2325, N. Y. City, or Manager Madison Square Garden Co., 

377 Broadway. New York. 



SPECIAL NOTICE.— For $2.00 any gentleman may become a member of the 
National Sportsmkn's Association, membership entitling him to free admission to the 
Sportsmen's Exposition, reduced rates at Association hotels, one year's subscription to 
the Official Bulletin, artd other privileges, which can be learned of by addressing the 
Sportsmen's Association, P. O. Box 2325, N. Y. City, for application blank and prospectus. 



»>v/»^AAv»v^^^^AVASV////» > ^>^ fc AVY^Vv^Vy^^^^^^^ 



RECREA TION. 



XXV 




VIEW OF IT. 

to be necessary for. the same men from having lived on these rations 10 days. 



Direct from Distiller 

to Consumer 





X FULL QUARTS . 
► Express Paid, j 



Saving Middlemen's Profits, 

Preventing Possibility of Adulteration. 

We are distillers with a wide reputation of 30 
years standing. We sell to consumers direct, so 
that our whiskey may be pure when it reaches you. 
Adulterated whiskey is dangerous, abominable, 
yet it is almost impossible to get pure whiskey 
from dealers. We have tens of thousands of cus- 
tomers who never buy elsewhere. We want more 
of them, and we make this offer to get them: 

We will send four full quart bottles of Hayner's Seven 
Year Old Double Copper Distiiled Rye for $3.20, Express 

Prepaid. We ship in plain packages— no marks to indicate 
contents (which will avoid possible comment). When 
you get it and test it, if it isn't satisfactory return it at our 
expense and we will return your $3.20. Such whiskey 
can not be purchased elsewhere for less than $5.00. 

We are the only distillers selling to consumers 
direct. Others who claim to be are dealers, buy- 
ing and selling. Our whiskey has our reputa- 
tion behind it. 

Our References— Dun or Bradstreet, Third National 
Bank or any business house in Dayton. 

Hayner Distilling Co., 267 to 273 W. 5th St. Dayton, 0. 



[We guarantee the above firm will do as agreed.— Editor.] 



XXVI 



FECREA TION. 



DON'T let Whisky get the best of you. Get 
the BEST of Whisky, which is the GENU- 
INE DISTILLERY BOTTLING of 



T Nfc 



H 



Old Pepper 



.AND.. 



I: <^y OLD <u> 

1 HENRY GLAYRYE 



Bottled and Distilled 
ONLY bv 



JAS. E. PEPPER & CO., Lexington, Ky. 



Under the same Formula for more than 100 YEARS, is guaranteed 
Absolutely the PUREST and BEST in the world. 

SAMPLE CASE, $15.00. 

Sent on trial, which, if not satisfactory, can 
be returned and money will be refunded. 



4®* Read and save the Coupons on Old Pepper Whisky and Old Henry 
Clay Rye, and see who gets the $5,500 in addition to the $1.00 per doz. 



• Hi 





COCOA 

FOR BREAKFAST 
AND SUPPER 

quality/flavor 
unsurpassed! 

VANILLA 
CHOCOLATE 

(pink wrapper.) 

FOR EATING .DRINKING/COOKING 

PURITY SDELICIOUSNESS OF FLAVOR 

UNEXCELLED!! 

our (ocoa and Chocolates are 

SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE 
ASK FOR e^S^y'-TAKE NO OTHER 



ESTABLISHED 187S 
TELEPHONE 2591 

ELLWOOD E. HUEBNER 

15 John R Street 
DETROIT, MICH. 

FURS 



PRACTICAL 

FURRIER and 

DESIGNER 

FASHIONS LATEST 
PRICES LOWEST 
PERSONAL ATTENTION 

TO ALL ORDERS 
WORK GUARANTEED 
Write for prices Mention RECREATION 



RECRBA 'J I OX. 



XXVll 



-ft ,' 



r- 






«ft^. 






^w 



THE JUSTLY FAMED ALL THE YEAR 



V 




•^ted Br /MOT^I^S^C41Ai|LES. 

/oIatest Improved System. FINEST ON THE BEACH. 

[ [very I^nown Hotel (onvbiience. 






». 



JAHES B.REILLY, ,<» 

PROF & OWNER r * 



WIN SLOWS ICE SKATES. 




Highest Grade 
in me world- 
Seed for Free Lithograph 
ed Illustrated Catalogue < 



•which tells you about the 



St. Nicholas Skating Club Hockey Skate, the combined judgment of the most celebrated ice hockey players. S 

Also, the St. Nicholas Skating Club Rink Skate, which have the hardest possible runners, concaved, nickel plated. 1 

The catalogue also tells of the National Club Skate, the " Antique" Speed Skate, Winslow's Ankle Brace for weak J 

ankles, and everything of interest to skaters. Send for the Catalogue, it is freehand worth a postal. { 

S^T* Sharpen Your Own Skates. Winslow's Skate Sharpener sent postpaid for 25c. "^K 

THE SAMUEL WINSLOW SKATE MFC. CO., Worcester, Mas.. 




Send 

for 

Our 



Violinists 

Book of OLD VIOLINS (FREE.) 

It contains historical sketches 
of the old masters of Cremona 
and Brescia from 1M0; illustrated; 
with fac-simile labels, also a des- 
criptive listof old violins possess- 
ing the pure mellow tone, costing 
from 125 to $5,000. A formal Cer- 
tificate of Genuineness with each 
violin. Several Violins sent on 
selection when desired. 

LYON & HEALY, Adams & Wabash Sts.,Chica|0. 



The L. B. Silver Co., Cleveland. Ohio, 
the most extensive shippers of thorough- 
bred swine in the world, are shipping their 
famous O. I. C.'s throughout the States, 
and foreign countries, every week. Three 
were recently shipped to Cuba and a pair to 
old Mexico. 



B Strong Stomach will Saoe your Eifc 

Therefore use Bayle's Horseradish Mustard. 
All sauces are valueless as tonics, and no other 
condiments compare with this. Ask for it. For 
sale everywhere. Geo. A. Bajle, St. Louis, Sols liaker. 



No Fire, Smoke, or Heat. Absolutely 
Safe. Send 5 Stamps for Catalogue. 



$250 and up 




TRUSCOTT BOAT MFG. CO. Drawer H, St. Joseph, Mich 



The Polk Miller Drug Co. puts out a 
complete line of dog remedies which are 
highly recommended by such eminent au- 
thorities on canine matters as the Hon. 
John S. Wise. Amory R. Starr. Gen. YY. E. 
Shattuc, " Old Dominion " Kit Kilbird and 
many others. Among the remedies which 
the Miller Co. has patented are Sergeant's 
Condition Pills. Sure Shot. Mange Cure. 
Arsenic and Iron Pills. Soft Carbolic Soap, 
etc. 

Every dog owner should write the Polk 
Miller Drug Co., Richmond. Ya. for a cat- 
alogue of these medicines. While you are 
about it, please mention Recreation. 



IN ANSWERING ADS ALWAYS 
MENTION RECREATION. 



XXV111 



RECREA TION. 



HARDMAN 



A • • • 

WONDER 
in 
Piano-building. 




BABY 



(From the New Hardman Catalogue.) 

The Greatest Success of 
Modern Piano~Building. 



Only 5 feet and 8 inches long, yet containing 

all the 
finest points 
of the 
Concert Grand. 



GRAND 



NEW YORK 



PIANO 



Hardhan, Peck & Co., Hfrs. 



HARDMAN HALL, 
Fifth Avenue and 19th Street. 



1 received the Martin rifle you sent me, 
for 25 subscriptions to Recreation, in 

I shape, and am well pleased with it. 
The third time it was shot I killed a buck 
which weighed 220 pounds. The bullet 
struck him in the left shoulder and came 
out through the right hip, which is good 
for a 32 calibre. 

F. II. J. Moore, Cuttingsville, Vt. 



For Sale: Bargain, valuable R. C. St. 
Bernard brood bitch. Vera F. registered. 
Also fine litter pups, 6 weeks old. Vera F. 
\ Sir Monroe, best breeding in America. 
T also import direct and breed Belgium 
Homers, best strains, all record birds, 200 
to 550 miles. 

( ieo. K. Vincent 
Hayward Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 



RECREA HON. 



XXIX 




Duplicate Whist Set, $1.00 

Cities method 

Handsome hardwood 
cabinet, compact, dura- 
ble, simple ; complete, 
with cards (bicycles), $4. 
Pronounced by experts 
the best and simplest 
method on the market. 

When not sold by 
dealers, sent direct from 
manufacturer on receipt 
of price. 

FREDERICK LINES, 178 Hillside Ave., WaterDury, Conn. 

Will Shine your Bike, your finest Gun, J$ 

your Revolver, your Silverware, your Jg 

Watch. It is a good thing. 4t 

ZILIKITE 

Insist upon your Dealer 
Keeping it 

Send 25 cents, for Large Box, by mail. 

THE ZILIKITE COMPANY 






AKRON, OHIO 



Captain Jack Crawford 

Alaska Prospecting and Mining Corporation 

CAPITAL STOCK - - $250,000 

Incorporated under New Jersey Laws. 

Shares $10 each. Full Paid. Non-assessable 
There are only 25,000 Shares 

PAYABLE IN FULL AT TIME OF SUBSCRIPTION OR IN 
INSTALMENTS IF PREFERRED 

Who has not heard of Captain Jack ? An expert 
mining prospector and developer through all parts of 
the West and the Cariboo Placer Mines of British 
Columbia,— being one of the original discoverers of 
Gold in the Black Hills in 1876,— first bringing before 
the public the immense mineral wealth of New Mexico, 
and drawing capital to its development. 

Loved and honored by Army men for his upright- 
ness and integrity, high in the regard and trust of the 
newspaper profession, he can count among his friends 
most of the prominent men in the country, beginnine- 
with President McKinley. 6 

A master pioneer; experienced, vigorous, and 
shrewd, he will lead and direct under this Corporation 
an expedition of practical and expert miners in the 
new Alaskan Gold fields. Mother lode claims will be 
taken up for this Company, to be sold at enormous 
profits, often without expending much capital in their 
development. 

c Stockholders can rest assured that reports 'from the 
held of operation, over Captain Jack's signature, will 
be authentic and trustworthy. 

Write for prospectus or call for further information 
at the offices of the Company, 

American Tract Society Building 
150 Nassau Street, New York City 

Captain Jack (. rawford, President and Gen'l Mer. 
General Horatio C. King, Vice-President. 
There are no promoters* shares 
fcvery share issued will be paid for in cash 




A Great Offer for 
the Holidays ■ 



by GERM ARI A WINE CELLARS 

Hammondsport and Rheims.N.Y. 

We are determined *.o introduce out 
goods among the very best people in 
the country, and we can see no better 
way of doing this than by selling thern 
a case of our goods, containing eleven 
bottles of wine and one bottle of 
our extra fine, double-distilled firape 
Brandy, at one-half its actual cost 
Upon receipt of $6.00, we will send, tc 
Bny reader of K FCREATION, one case 
of our goods, all first class, and put up 
in elegant style, assorted, as follows: 

1 Quart Bottle Grand Imperial 

Sec Champagne 
1 Quart Bottle Delaware 



Brandy 



Riesling 

Tokay 

8wect Catawba 

8herry 

Khlr.1 

Niagara 

Angelica 

Port 

8weet Isabella 

Imperial Grapo 



This offer is made mainly 
to introduce our Grand Im- 
perial Sec Champagne and 
our fine double-distilled 
Grape Brandy, without 
which no Sportsman or 
Hunter should start on an 
expedition, as it is very 
necessary where such exer- 
cise is taken. This case of 
goods is offered at about 
one-half its actual cost and 
it will please us if our 
friends and patrons will 
take advantage of this and 
help us introduce our goods, 
orden ihould be ta before Dee. 16. 



Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Mr. T. W. Hickson, Bowling Green 
Building, N. Y. 

Dear Sir: It gives me pleasure to inform 
you that the New Zealand tent which I pur- 
chased for the Nicatous Club, and which 
was used in Maine last summer, was in 
every way satisfactory. It was considered, 
by the President of the Club, and others 
who camped in it with us, the most satis- 
factory tent they had ever used. The guides 
are enthusiastic in their praise of it. 
Yours truly, 

Marshal L. Bacon. 



For Exchange: A fine St. Bernard dog. 
registered in the American Kennel Club of 
New York. He is worth $150. Will ex- 
change for diamond of equal value. Age 
18 months: 169 pounds. 

O. C. Krone, Richmond Ind. 



For Sale: Richards 16 gauge shot gun, 
in good shooting condition with loading 
tools and crimper: for $12. Will kill game 
with any gun. 

Chas. J. Coughlin. Brocton, N. Y. 



Wanted: A few live silver gray and 
Alaska black foxes. Address Henry Per- 
kins, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



XXX 



RECREA TION. 



OIlKre to 8oi?r6ood Shooting ^fishing 




The Best Game Country 

in the Mississippi Valley to- 
day is along the line of the . 

IRON MOUNTAIN 
ROUTE 



In Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana 

Small Game is very abundant, and has been shot at very little. Deer and 
Turkeys are plentiful, and the fishing, for black bass and other game fishes, 
of the very best. This Line also reaches, direct from St. Louis or Memphis, 

by double daily through car service, the famous hunting and fishing grounds 
on the Gulf. 

SPECIAL FEATURES OFFERED 



Reduced Rates to Sportsmen 
Hunting Cars Fully Equipped 



Side Tracking Cars On or Near the Grounds 
Carrying Free of Dogs, Guns, and Camp Equipment 



WRITE for copy of Ideal Hunting and Fishing Pamphlet (descriptive and 
illustrated) of best locations, and other information, to Company's Agents, or to 



C. G. WARNER 

Vice-President 



W. B. DODDRIDGE 

General Manager 

ST. IL.OTJIS 



H. C. TOWNSEND 
General Passenger and Ticket Agent 



Some Rare * * 
Opportunities 



..•YOU CAN GET.. 

A $75 Bicycle for 75 yearly subscrip- 
tions to Recreation* 

A $35 Hammerless Breech -Loading- 
Shot Gun for 40 yearly subscriptions* 

A $25 Camera for 25 subscriptions, 

A $20 Gold Watch for 20 subscriptions. 

A $14 Repeating Rifle for 20 sub- 
scriptions. 

A Good Single Barrel Shot Gun for 
\ 5 subscriptions. 

A Single Shot Rifle, or 

A Fishing- Rod, or 

An Automatic Reel, or 

A Kenwood Sleeping; Bag- 
For JO subscriptions. 

WHY DON'T YOU GET THEM ? 

Write for premium list and sample 
copies Of RECREATION 




EMPIRE STATE 
**& EXPRESS. 

Aboutwhich all know, more or less; 
It run5 from New York lo Buffalo, 
Every day in the week, but Sunday you know; 
At a speed so qreat, 

Through the Empire State, 
As to earn for its line 
The title sublime — of 

"AMERICA'S GREATEST RAILROAD.* 

**TIie New york Cenlral leads the world" 

► LeilieS Weekly. 

Sw^B^^^W ooPY*rOMT, ibW, ev orcmac h danitla, <hn»rai rAMfnorit a'hnt. 



i 



RECREA 770 JV. 



XXXI 



\ "pi ,***t"' .*'- ■'■-.• 



N 



EW YEAR'S 
GREETING 



i* 



mL' »■»,; _..,'' 






GET THERE" DUCKING BOAT, FITTED with grass blinds 



Be sure and use a 

Mullin's Metal Boat 

for your outing trips dur- 
ing this year, and you 
will be prepared to go for 
many future years, as 
these boats last a lifetime 
and are always ready for 
use. Made in Manganese 
Bronze, Galvanized Steel, 
and Aluminum. 

We solicit your inquiries. 
Will send catalogue and full 
information on application. 

W. H. MULLINS 

228 depot St., Salem, Ohio 



T 
H 

E 

E 
R 
A 
C 
R 
A 
P 
H 



ANIMATED FICTITBlBS 




The only projecting apparatus ever offered at a low 
price that will give in perfection this latest and most 
popular form of amusement, pictures life-size and life- 
like in movement. Can be easily operated and is ready 
for immediate use, with powerful lamp, continuous 
films, and screen. Send for descriptive circular. 



the new Vork talking machine E £f# y 

The Orchestra, The Orator, The Soloist, 
are yours when you purchase "The New 
York Talking Hachine." Amuses the 
family and your friends. 
Price, ail complete, $6.00. Records, 50c. each 



G. NUTTING & CO., 83, D, NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK 



In the article " Excessive Catches," 
which appeared in August Recreation, 
you ask what department of the animal 
kingdom Messrs. Wadleigh and Wheaton 
(who caught 412 trout in 3 days) belong to. 
I should say they belong to that class of 
animals who root for their living. What 
a shame to allow such creatures at large! 
They are not sportsmen, and no man who 
is a thorough sportsman would do such a 
thing. To call them swine is expressing it 
mildly. Bristol Rod, Chester, Pa. 



I have just returned from a 3 days' trip to 
Kelley's Island, for black bass. We had 
fall weather of the bad sort, and were un- 
able to fish much, but on one day we suc- 
ceeded in landing 36 as fine bass as one 
would wish to see, ranging from 1 to 4 
pounds. This catch was made by my part- 
ner and me. The same day 3 boats got 60. 

We stopped with Mr. H. F. Catanach, 
and he left nothing for us to desire in the 
way of good treatment. I would advise any 
one wishing to try our fishing to write him 
for particulars. 

Chas. Von Weller, Sandusky, O. 



Why not join the A. C. A.? The dues 
are but $1 a year, including a subscription 
to the Official Organ,— Editor* 



Going Into Alaska? 



You want the 



Acme "Klondike Special" 

1 6-foot boat, carries 1,500 lbs. 
easily. Folds into cylinder 5=ft. 
long by 1 0=in. diameter. A man 
can pack one, a cay use two. 




■miMimmiiwiiiiwmmiii'i 



The Comptroller of N. W. M. Police, the Hon. 
Fred White,writes from Ottaiva: " Those who have 
tested the Acme strongly reco?nmejid it. We have 
adopted the Acme for our requirements." 

Major Walsh, Governor of Klondike, has a 14-ft. 
Acme for his personal use. We have our third order 
from Canadian Gov. Send for photo of boat carrying 
ten persons, and for testimonials about Acmes, which 
safely ran the rapids of the Yukon and are now used 
in prospecting. Boats have outside Air Tubes. 
Bounce safely from snags and rocks. Better write 
at once. 

Acme Folding Boat Co. 

niamipburg, Ohio, U-S,A, 



XXX11 



R EC RE A TION. 



The Big Game 

North America 




ITS HABITS, HABITAT, HAUNTS, AND CHARACTERISTICS 
HOW, WHEN, AND WHERE TO HUNT IT 

A Book for the Sportsman and the Naturalist 



EDITED BY 



G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 



AUTHOR OF " CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," "HUNTING IN THE GREAT 
WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS," ETC. 



8vo, 600 Pages, 80 Illustrations. 

Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Calf, $5,00; Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CONTENTS 



Introduction. By the Honorable John Dean Caton, 

author of "The Antelope and Deer of America, "etc. 
Moose Hunting in the Rocky Mountains. Newton 

Hibbs (" Roxey Newton "). 
Elk Hunting in the Olympic Mountains. W. A. Perry 

(" Sillalicum "). 
The Wapiti (Poem). By " Wah-bah-mi-mi." 
The Caribou. By William P. Lett ("Algonquin") 

and Dr. R. B. Cantrell. 
The Mule Deer. Rev. Joshua Cooke (" Boone"). 
The Mule Deer of Southern California. T. S. Van 

Dyke, author of " The Still Hunter," etc. 
The Columbia Black-tail Deer. Thomas G. Farrell. 
The Virginia Deer. Walter M. Wolfe (" Shoshone "). 
A Deer Hunt (Poem). " Wah-bah-mi-mi." 
Hunting the Grizzly Bear Rev. Dr. W. S. Rainsford. 
The Polar Bear. Sergt. Francis Long, of the Greely 

Arctic Expedition, and George S. McTavish, of the 

Hudson Bay Company. 
A Polar Bear Hunt. 

The Black Bear. Col. Geo. D. Alexander. 
The Buffalo. Orin Belknap (" Uncle Fuller "). 



The Musk Ox. Sergt. H. Bierdebick, of the Greely 
Arctic Expedition. 

Still-hunting the Antelope. 
(" Gaucho "). 

Coursing the Antelope. M. 

The Death of Venus (Poem). 

The Rocky Mountain Goat. 

The Rocky Mountain Sheep, 
na"). 

The Peccary. A. G. Requa. 

The Cougar, or Mountain Lion, 
licum "). 

The Lynx. J. C Nattrass. 

The Wild Cat. Daniel Arrowsmith ("Sangamon"). 

The Wolf. Wm. P. Lett. 

The W'olverine. C. A. Cooper (" Sibyllene "). 

Coon Hunting in Southern Illinois. Daniel Arrow- 
smith (" Sangamon "). 

Fox Hunting in Virginia. Dr. M. G. Ellzey. 

Alligator Shooting in Florida. Cyrus W. Butler. 

The Ethics of Field Sports. Wm. B. Leffingwell. 



Arthur W- du Bray 

E. Allison. 

Wm. P. Lett. 
John Fannin. 

G. O. Shields (" Coqui- 



W. A. Perry (" Silla- 



The Hon. John Dean Caton, the eminent naturalist and jurist, author of "The Antelope and Deer of 
America," etc., says of this work : 

" Altogether, there is given here such a study of the natural history of our game quadrupeds, and of the 
thrilling incidents encountered in hunting them, as has never before been offered to the reading world. Each 
chapter in this book is in itself a complete work, and the book, as a whole, is a most valuable library. 

" Any one of the names on Mr. Shields' list of contributes should insure the sale of an entire edition of 
his book, and when we multiply this possibility by twenty-six, the whole number of names on his title-page, 
the result obtained indicates the magnitude of the success that should, and that we hope will, crown his labors 
and those of his collaborateurs." 

"This sumptuous volume, profusely and elegantly illustrated, written by a score or more of sportsmen, is a 
very captivating book. No single writer could have had all the experiences here narrated. The descriptions 
and incidents cover every variety of large game on the continent. ***** The stories are as excellent in 
their variety as in their quality. There are no dull chapters in the book. In fact, it may be said it is the finest 
collection of hunting stories ever published." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

" This is one of the best and most valuable of the books as yet written or edited by Mr. Shields. It com- 
prises a collection of intelligently written monographs on all the various kinds of big game to be found in 
North America, from the grizzly to the polar bear, and from the Virginia deer to the Rocky Mountain goat. 
Each writer speaks from his own experience, tells what he has done and seen, and recounts the often thrilling 
incidents he has met with in hunting. All the contributors to the volume are well-known writers on field sportc 
and hunting, and each one writes of a species of game he has studied for years in the field, on the mountain, or 
in the forest." 

" The paper on the Rocky Mountain sheep is by the Editor, and is a fine account of the wildest, wariest, 
arifl most difficult animal to hunt on the continent. Mr. Shields is a most enthusiastic sportsman, and more- 
over, wields the pen of a ready writer, as indeed all these sportsmen do, so that one follows him in his adven- 
tures with almost breathless interest. 

" From beginning to end and in every chapter this book is positively fascinating." — Chicago Herald. 



This book will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of p>ire by the editor. 

G. O. SHIELDS, 19 West 24th Street, New York 
Also given as a Premium for 7 Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREA T10N. 



XXXlll 



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package. ANYTHING. 

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Without Rules 
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A book of forty pages which teaches punctuation 
rapidly by example. Many people who have studied 
English, Latin and Greek Grammar are very careless 
and slovenly punctuators. This book is indispensable 
to all writers. Memorizing rules and exceptions 
wastes time and they are soon forgotten. 

LACONIC PUBLISHING CO., 
123 Liberty St., New York. 



By mail, ao cents. 



PLAYS 



and other Entertainment Books 

Send for 120-page catalogue free. 
Dramatic Publishing Co., Chicago 



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A bold, brave book teaching ideal marriage, rights ol 
the unborn cnild,a designed and controlled maternity. 

Union Signal : Thousands of women have blessed 
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women will bless her for Karezza. 

Arena : Karezza is worth its weight In gold. 
Sample pages free. Agents Wanted. Prepaid $1.00. 
ALICE B. STOCKHAM & CO., 277 MADISON ST., CHICAGO* 



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Singers (Made by us) $8, $11.50, $15 
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factory. Save agents large profits. 
Over 100,000 in me. Catalogue and 
a g»^R|B|!sfi!lJi testimonials Free. Write at once. 
£g %A" «■ Address (in full). CASH BUYERS' UNION 

158-164 West Van Buren St., B85» Chicago, 111- 




L. L. Bates, Box 439, Seattle, Wash., 
offers his services as guide for hunting, 
exploring, and prospecting parties in 
Alaska. He has lived in that Territory 8 
years, has travelled many thousands of 
miles through the interior, and is prepared 
to give accurate and reliable information 
concerning it. 

References: Lieut. G. T. Emmons, U. S. 
Navy, Naval Dept., Washington, D. C. ; 
Will D. Jenkins, Secretary of State, Olym- 
pia, Wash., and the editor of Recreation. 

Correspondence promptly answered. 

Will return to Alaska in March, '98. * 



" Queer about those Klondike mosqui- 
toes, that bite when snow is on the 
ground." 

"Not at all; everything up there is 
rigged out in seal skin." 



ASHLAND 
H0USI 



FOlstTH AVE. 
and 24th ST. 

Two blocks from 
Madison Sq. Garden 



...HEADQUARTERS FOR SPORTSMEN 

American and ^m 

European Plan 

RATES : 

Rooms, with board, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 per day 
Rooms, without board, - $1.00 and upwards 
Breakfast, • • - 75 cents 

Lunch, - - - » 50 lk 

Table d' Hote Dinner, - 75 M 



Can black bass, while ascending streams, 
go over dams, by going straight up through 
the sheet of water pouring over the dam? 
Is it not a fact that they jump over the dam, 
if not too high, where there are no fish lad- 
ders. If they go up through the overflow 
how high a dam can they climb, in that 
manner? S. F. D. 

I referred this letter to the U. S. Fish 
Commission, Washington, D. C, and here 
is its reply: 

While the black bass is an active fish and 
there are on record many remarkable leaps, 
it has not the habit, like the salmon, of 
jumping over dams and other similar ob- 
structions. 

Very respectfully, 
J. J. Brice, Commissioner. 



ALASKAN VIEWS 

Take a look at the country, and the methods of 
travel, before you start for the gold fields. 

A full series of views of Juneau, Dyea, Skaguay, 
Chilkat Pass, Miners and outfits, along the route, etc. 

50 cents each. An assorted doz. $5.00 

GEO. 6. CANTWELL, Taxidermist, Juneau, Alaska. 



WANTED.— LIVE ELK, MOOSE, CARIBOU, BLACK- 
tail deer, wild turkey, European roebucks, fallow deer, 
etc.,' for Litchfield Park, Adirondacks. Address, with par- 
ticulars, EDWARD H. LITCHFIELD, 59 Wall Street, New 
York. 



*~L. 



Blair's Pills 

Great English Remedy for 

GOUT and RHEUMATISM. 

SAFE, SURE, EFFECTIVE. 
.Druggists, or 224 William St., New York. 6688 _ 




IN ANSWERING ADS, IF YOU 
WILL KINDLY MENTION REC- 
REATION YOU WILL GREATLY 
OBLIGE THE EDITOR 



XXXIV 



RECREA TION. 



TAXIDERMIST AND SCULPTOR 




GEO. H. STORCK 

123 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



HIGH ART IN TAXIDERMY 

I have, by my new method of mounting animals, by 
combining Sculptury with Taxidermy, obtained results 
that by no other method have ever been attained. 



A despatch from Port Townsend, Wash., 
says: 

An official report has been filed at the custom house, here, 
by Inspector Webber, who has been detailed at Point Rob- 
erts, for the past 3 months, showing that the salmon catch, 
of the fishing season, just closed, is the largest ever known, 
in the Northwest. The Alaska Packing Company, at Point 
Roberts alone, put up 95,000 cases, using 65,000 salmon. 
Altogether 2,500,000 fish, of the sock-eye variety, were 
caught near the mouth of the Frazer river, during the 
season, and nearly as many humpbacked salmon were taken 
from the traps and left on the mud flats to die and decay. 



Yesterday I caught a Rocky Mountain 
trout that measured, 20 inches in length, 
12^4 inches in girth, 5^2, inches in depth, 
and that weighed 5 pounds. Is not that 
very thick and long according to average 
length of a trout? 

S. N. Leek, Jackson, Wyo. 

A Practical Common Sense Camp Store* 

In 6 Sizes. Patent applied for. 

The lightest, most com- 
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stove made; either with 
or without oven. Won't 
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steel top, smooth body, 
heavy lining, telescopic 
pipe carried inside the 
stove. 

Burns largest wood, keeps fire longest of any 
■tove made. For full particulars address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, I1L 




Taxidermists' Supplies 



When you get 
a good speci- 
men of bird, 
fish, mammal 
etc., that you 
would like to 
get mounted, 
send it to us. We 
will do it right and 
also make the price 
right. 

Send five cents for 
new Taxidermists' 
Catalogue. 



Artificial 



Taxidermist, 

217 Madison St., Chicago. 




We prepare 
and mount all 
specimens o f 
natural histo- 
ry true to na- 
ture, in the 
best style ol 
the Taxider- 
mist's art, at 
reasonable 
prices. 
We also keep a 
complete line of 

Oologists' 
and 

Entotno 3 
logists' 
Supplies 



Sportsmen, fiuntm 

Get your hunting trophies mounted 
true to nature, at Prof. G. Stainsky's 
Institute of Scientific Taxidermy, 
1180 Cascade Avenue, Colorado 
Springs, Colo. 

Dealer in Game Heads, Fur Rugs, Robes, 
Navajo Blankets, Horn Chairs, etc. 

Medals awarded at 

World's Columbian Exposition, Paris, Vienna 

and Berlin 



GAME HEADS AND RAW FURS BOUGHT 




Ernest L. Brown 
The Minnesota 
Taxidermist 

Does true and artistic work 
at reasonable figures. 

WARREN, MINN. 



Moosehide Moccasins $ Slippers 



METZ & SCHLOERB, Oshkosh, Wis. 

MEN'S ..-- $2.75 
LADIES' AND BOYS' 2.25 

Sent, prepaid, on receipt of price. 



PRICE: 



Write for our illus- 
trated circular and 
price-list of hand made 
hunting shoes and mocca- 
Bins of every description. 




BROOK TROUT 

We have a large number of extra fine 
yearling trout for sale at Extremely 
Low Prices. For particulars address 

The Bine Hills Trout Preserve Co. 

Box: 1373 MERIDEN, CONN. 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 







is PLEMSED to mmmGE to 

ALL SHOOTERS 

of RIFLES, PISTOLS or SHOT GUNS 

that UaaI UamJ Baj%1? M&b Q 1S J ust out - IJ[ 6 pages of solicl in- 
the D(16aB nal9iS B, Pl|y§l BTOi 3P formation about Nitro, Smokeless and 
Black Powders, how to use them in various arms to get the best results. It is 
the recognized authority on all matters relating to Shooting. You can't afford to b« 
without it. Mailed to any part of the world. Vour address with two 2 cent Stamps to 

IDEAL MANUFACTURING CO., New Haven,Conn., U.S.A. 

WHEN YOU WRITE KINDLY MENTION " RECREATION " 
Sectional View 





Don't believe imitators of "HENDRYX" standard 
goods -when they say their Fishing Reels "are NOW 
as good as HENDRYX". The fact that they 

imitate proves the "HEND R YX ' ' is the recognized 
standard line of Fishing Reels. Ask your dealer for 



Globe Bearing. 



them. 
The Andrew b. Hendrvx Co. 




New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 



This is a picture of Sewell New- 
house, inventor of the celebrated 

NEWHOUSE STEEL TRAPS 

known the world over as the 
best traps made for catching fur- 
bearing animals. Send to 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd., Kenwood, N. Y. 

for catalogs, prices and discounts. 





RUPTURE 



ABSOLUTELY 
CURED 



without truss, operation or con- 
finement, on strictly scientific 
professional principles, based on 
an experience of many years. 
My method of treatment is known only to myself, and I object to long 
letters explanatory thereof. An interview is positively necessary for those re- 
quiring information. 

Complete cure effected in 6 to 8 weeks ; one treatment each week, 
with no detention whatever from business. 

SAGREDO 

Care F. C. PRESTON, 98 Hudson Street, New York 



Web Snow Shoes; Made of best raw 
caribou skin, and the best hickory that 
grows. 

Thongs thoroughly twisted and carefully 
woven. I make the best snow-shoe in the 
market. They look w-ell, wear well, hang 
well and will not bag, in wet snow.. 

A. M. Dunham, Norway, Me. 



For Sale or Exchange; Female Eng- 
lish Pointer, 2 years old, broken on wood- 
cock and grouse; granddaughter of Lad 
of Kent; good pedigree; color lemon and 
white — a beauty. Would exchange for 
Lady's bicycle, or Gramophone. Address 

Lady Reader, Care Recreation. 



xxxvi RECREA TION. 



Cruisings in the Cascades 



A NARRATIVE OF 



TRAVEL, EXPLORATION, AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY, 

HUNTING, AND FISHING 

WITH SPECIAL CHAPTERS ON HUNTING THE 

Grizzly Bear, the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Qoat, and Deer; also on 

Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; on a Cattle Roundup ; 

Life Among the Cowboys, Etc. 

By G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

AUTHOR OF "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," "HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE 

BIG HOLE," ETC. 

J2mo. 300 Pages, 75 Illustrations. Cloth, $2.00 ; Half Calf, $3.00. 

The learned writer, scientist, and sportsman, Col. W. D, Pickett, better known as 
" P.," says of this book : "The true lover of nature who delights to occasionally escape 
from the annoyances and worriments inseparable from so-called civilized life, and to 
wander amid scenes that tell only of the infinite power, the beneficence, and the grandeur 
of the Great Ruler ; who delights to worship in the grandest of all His temples — the 
mountains ; who realizes and feels His presence on every mountain peak, in every dark 
canyon, in every rushing wind, in every gentle zephyr, and who, amid such scenes, 
above all realizes his own weakness and littleness ; he it is who will take pleasure in 
following the author amid some of the grandest and most beautiful scenery on this con- 
tinent. If, added to this, the reader should be imbued with some of the tastes and sym- 
pathies of the sportsman, additional zest will be given in the pleasant, graphic, and truthful 
descriptions of fishing and hunting incidents. The young sportsman who is desirous of 
hunting large game, will find here many indispensable hints as to their habits and the 
best methods of pursuing them. This book will meet with universal favor." 

Mr. T. S. Van Dyke, author of "The Still Hunter," and other popular books, says: 
" It is one of the most entertaining books on field sports yet published. Mr. Shields 
always has something to say, and says it in a way that makes one see it. He is never 
dull, and there is an air of truth about his work that fully satisfies the reader." 

Mr. Orin Belknap, known and loved of all sportsmen by his familiar pseudonym 
"Uncle Fuller," says : "The author of this work has placed the sportsmen of America 
under lasting obligations by his pleasing descriptions of his adventures in the wilds of 
these little-known mountains. Any writer who calls the attention of American sportsmen 
to the wonderful opportunities for legitimate sport — worth a trip across the continent, or 
a life-time of the tame enjoyment of Eastern sportsmanship — hidden away in the mysteri- 
ous gorges of the Cascade range, deserves the thanks of each and all who ever shouldered 
gun or rod. May this book prompt others of America's adventurous lovers of the wilder- 
ness to more thorough search for the hidden wonders of these mighty hills." 

" Boone," the writer of so many charming reminiscences of days among the hills, 
says of this book: "To the reader whose calling in life, or whose personal limitations 
shut him off from the privileges enjoyed by Mr. Shields, there is given in these pages 
descriptions of scenery so vivid as to enable him to realize the grandeur in nature of the 
land that gives us birth. There are given him descriptions and traits of animals, in their 
wild state and in their native haunts, that he may never see save in collections. Let me 
commend it to all into whose hands this book may come — and they ought to be many — to 
give it a careful, not a cursory reading. On second, and attentive reading, I was really 
struck by the accuracy of the author's descriptions of the bison, elk, antelope, grizzly bear, 
and mountain goat ; and the delineations from his camera make the whole work graphic 
indeed." 

" Sillalicum," another well-known and popular contributor to the sportsmen's journals, 
has this to say: "Mr. Shields evidently saw everything that could interest the sports- 
man, farmer, lumberman, or tourist; and has described the country and its objects of 
interest in an effective and truthful way, with the eloquence of the artist, and the enthusiasm 
of the sportsman. No book ever published on Western sports is so delightfully written. 
A perusal of its pages places the reader among the scenes described, and he imagines 
himself looking at the rushing schools of salmon ; he hears the murmuring of the moun- 
tain stream ; the whispering of the alpine zephyr ; and can almost catch the gleam of the 
mountain lake as it washes the foot of the cragged peak on which roams the white goat." 



RECREATION. xxxvii 



Says W. B. Leffingwcll, the gifted author of " Wild Fowl Shooting," and of " Shooting 
on Upland, Field, and Marsh": " I have rarely encountered, anywhere, such vivid descrip- 
tions of life in the mountains, as are found in ' Cruisings in the Cascades.' My blood 
tingles as I follow the author, through these pages, in his encounters with the noble game 
he found in the great hills ; and I long to lay aside the cares of business and seek those 
mighty fastnesses wherein he had such grand sport." 

" Men who enjoy jaunts into the woods, in search of big game, will find this book ex- 
tremely interesting." — New York Herald. 

"'Cruisings in the Cascades' is by far the best thing Coquina has ever written." 

— American Field. 

" It is a handsomely printed and finely illustrated volume, made up of spirited sketches 
of travels, explorations, hunting, and fishing. It is charmingly interesting. The author 
mingles solid facts of great value with accounts of his wild adventures, and tells the story 
in an offhand style that banishes sleep from tired eyes." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

" Mr. Shields handles a much diversified group of subjects with a master hand, and 
adheres throughout to a singularly pleasant and original way of expressing himself. His 
chapter on * Trouting in the Rocky Mountains 'is as delicious a bit of word-painting as 
we have ever met with." — Sports Afield. , 

"'Cruising in the Cascades' is Mr. Shields' latest, and, we think, best publication. 
It will be heartily appreciated by American sportsmen. One of the most important chap- 
ters in the book is that on the Rocky Mountain goat. Heretofore little has been written 
on that animal, and Mr. Shields has treated the subject in a thorough and careful manner. 
He has recorded much valuable matter, with regard to this animal, which can be referred 
to by naturalists and sportsmen with profit. Many of the illustrations in the book are from 
photographs taken by the author, and are unusually good." — Shooting and Fishing. 

" Coquina is widely and favorably known as an entertaining, practical writer on out- 
door sports, and 'Cruisings in the Cascades' will add to a well-earned fame in his special 
field. His pen-pictures of wild life and wild sports, in the Far West, are accompanied by 
many excellent illustrations of fish and game, and of the scenes and places visited, adding 
greatly to the attractive character of the work." — The Independent. 

" The pages are breezy and the illustrations numerous and attractive, the camera 
having been freely used by the author in his travels." — The Bookbuyer. 

" Mr. Shields touches on numerous subjects. Nothing seems to escape his keen eye, 
and whatever he describes becomes vivid to the mind of the reader, full of interest and 
clearly defined. His pen-pictures of hunting adventures, boating, and the sports of the 
ranch, tingle with the warm glow of quickened pulse-beats and rapidly coursing blood." 

— Book Chat. 

"The author's style of writing would make even a dull subject enjoyable, but with 
such a theme — his own extended and rich experience — we have a book whose wide circula- 
tion seems assured. There are enchanting sketches of scenery, pleasing stories of moun- 
tain climbing, of hunting and fishing ; excellent estimates and delineations of Indian 
character, drawn from personal contact ; a fine description of salmon and their habits, and 
such accounts of bear, elk, deer, and goat hunting as to make the blood of the hunter 
tingle in every vein." — Public Opinion. 

" Mr. Shields is not only a hunter, but an angler, and an amateur photographer, and 
on his excursions in the mountains has made good use of his opportunities. As a narra- 
tive of adventure the book is entertaining, and as a record of sport it will delight many 
readers." — The Literary World. 

" It is sure to meet with a large sale." — Chicago Tribune. 

" It is by all odds the most fascinating book on big game hunting ever published." 

— The jfournalist. 

" The illustrations are, for the most part, made from photographs, and are one of the 
chief charms of the book. Those who have read ' Rustlings in the Rockies,' by the same 
author, are familiar with the charm of his style." — Photographic Times. 

" It is beautifully printed and profusely illustrated, detailing a great variety of ad- 
venture in travel, exploration, hunting, and fishing. Mr. Shields is an enthusiastic lover 
of nature, in all her wilder forms, with an eye quick to see the beauty and grandeur of 
river and plain, and forest and mountain, and a ready pen to describe them. He is a keen 
and tireless sportsman, a quick and accurate judge of men, with that curious quality of 
humor that enables a man to see and enjoy the oddities, even in perilous passages, all 
grounded on the restless spirit of the born rover. To the great majority of men, for 
whom wild adventure possesses an irresistible fascination, this book is full of the most 
absorbing interest. "—Chicago Times. 

Mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the Author, 

G. O. SHIELDS, J9 West 24th Street, New York, 

Or given as a Premium for 5 Subscriptions to Recreation 



XXXV111 



RECREATION. 




© 

© 
© 



© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
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© 
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o 

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Every 
Sportsman 
Should 
Have a 



WATER-PROOF I 

TENT | 

A camper knows the advantages of a tent that is an absolute protection against rain ♦ j5 

and dampness. We secure this advantage by OUR water-proof PROCESS and 9 

avoid the extra bulk and weight of a fly. 3 

We make tents of all sizes, shapes and materials, suited to the needs of hunters. ^ 
campers, travellers, canoeists ; also 

Water-Proof Sleeping Bags 

CANVAS BUCKETS, AMMUNITION, PROVISION, 

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36 South Street, New York 



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RECREA TION. xxxix 



$ Prospectors 

$ Hunters 1 




% Fishermen * 

^ Invariably ask for the original, ^ 

^ practical, light-weight.*. &> 

| KENWOOD J 

SLEEPING BAG $ 

/^N sale or in use from the Klondike to Mexico. 



Tested and tried under all conditions and 
changes of climate— never found wanting : satis- 
faction is guaranteed. Three Bags— use one or 
more, as the occasion requires. Easily cleaned or 
aired— absolutely sanitary. Seamless ; no draughts, 
repairs, or useless fasteners. Makes a small and 
very light roll— particularly suitable for the Klon- 
dike, where there are already hundreds in use. A 
House and Home in itself. Include one in your 
outfit. Very low Prices, $6.00 to $16.00. 



t 
t 

The Kenwood Storm-hood :ff^^22?S $ 

t 



a perfect protection against cold and wind. 



The Kenwood Hunting-cape i£!^J£21£& 

the sportsman. Unusual warmth with lightness and perfect freedom of motion. 



Every Prospector, Camper, Hunter, Angler, or Military Man should send for 
our samples and FREE illustrated circular about these articles. 

* THE KENWOOD MILLS, - - Albany, N. Y. ^ 



RECREATION, 




f\>|*ofTent~Fr^. 

K MOSQUITO - PROOF ^" COLD 
LONDIKE I ENTJB 
WIND and WATER- PI 



In the above diagram the dotted lines indi 



Inner «* 

j@oorwa$! SLEEPING 

^JTent *t TeNT 



T)00rW^V Closed ■ cate the position of the inner or sleeping r~+*..Y*A PUn of Ton4-«* 

jaa>i »vc^r ■«.><- tent witl j: n the outer or storm tent ground kimi oj i errro . 



[J pf fa fir 8 IT says (speaking; of Alaska) — There is a feature tn this coun- 
■ t I Kllrr ^ ^hich, though insignificant on paper, is to the traveler the 
most terrible and poignant infliction he can be called upon to 
bear in a new land* I refer to the clouds of bloodthirsty mosquitoes, accompanied 
by a 'bindicti'be ally in the shape of a small poisonous black fly, under the stress of 
%hose persecution the strongest man with the firmest %ill must either feel depressed 
or succumb to lo%> fefar. Language is simply unable to portray the misery and 
annoyance acco npanying their presence* 

HR CflQC ( 132 Court S T > Boston), after using one of our Tents in mosquito andmidge infect- 
Un« rUuu ed country says, "Your Tent is absolutely perfection, not a skid or midge could 
invade our privacy, and at daybreak, when they get in their most deadly work on man, we could lie 
in peace and defy them." So much for mosq uitoes, now as to 

PfH n By means of one of the now famous PRIMUS Stoves (weight 2 lbs.) the temperature of the 
uULU inner or sleeping Tent may be kept comfortably warm in the very coldest weather. It gives 
off neither smoke nor smell, hence needs no chimney. 

HR NANCPN usec * one wit h & reat satisfaction on his last Polar Expedition, and speaks very 
Um« NAIiOlIi enthusiastically of it: " We took with us rather more than four gallons of petro- 
leum for the PRIMUS, and this quantity lasted us 120 days, enabling us to cook two hot meals per 
day and melt an abundance of water," 



i)i iicrvviBC u hiibci y, ilium 

PRICE: 



With a Klondike Tent and a Primus Stove, the two worst evils of the Klondike may be defied, and life, 

otherwise a misery, made comfortable. 

A 12 x io>rf Tent, with a 1)4 x 1)4 inner chamber, accommodating from 3 to 5 
sleepers— weighing about 25 lbs.— will be supplied at f¥\. ^\ #■ or tents 
with small PRIMUS Stove, $2750— with extra large J4* m l ^\ Stove— 

$29.50; larger tents, or tents of heavier material (which we do not advise), at propor- \|/ «• ^^ tlonate 

prices. 

Offices 

430-431 AND 432 

Bowling Green Bldq. 
Broadway. 

NEW YORK, U.8.A. 



interested 
Please 
Correspond 
With 



Mosquito-proofTent fio 
Successors to 7. W. HltKSMN W 



MANUFACTURERS OF UP-TO-DATE TENTS AND TENTING EQUIPMENTS 



RECREA TION. 



xli 



The 4 Leading Electric Novelties 





Battery Table Lamp 
$2.75 complete. 



Necktie Light. Dollar Motor. 

We undersell all on Everything Electrical 
OHIO ELECTRIC WORKS, CLEVELAND, O. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR ELECTRIC NOVELTIES $6.00 Bicycle Lights, $2.50 

AGENTS WANTED SEND FOR 1898 CATALOGUE, JUST OUT 




SOME GOOD GUIDES. 



FLORIDA. 

C. L. Farnham, Avon Park, bear, deer, turkeys, quails, 

ducks, black bass, etc. 
Oliver Tinny, Ozona, Hillsboro Co., deer, bear, turkeys, 

quails, ducks and salt-water fishing. 

E. M. Reynolds, Fort Myers, ditto 

Wm. Webb, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

Frank Guptill, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

W. J. Meyer, Tarpon Springs, " 

Frank Carson, Ft. Meyers, " 

E. T. Robinson, Keuka, ** 
Carson Bros., Frostproof, " 
J. L. Sandlin, Punta Gorda, " 
Oliver Archer, Clearwater, " 
L. W. Scroggins, Homeland, " 
Capt. Jas. Argo, Oviedo, " 

F. J. Adams, Sanford, " 
C. B. Bailey, Winter Haven, " 
W. H. Steacy, Pt. Tampa City, " 
Wm. J. Lyon, Interlacken, ,c 
L. L. Sutton, Sutherland, ** 
M. B. Carson, Frost Proof, Polk Co., " 
W. D. Isler, Eagle Lake, " 
George W. Hawthorn, Hawthorn, " 
C. H. Hill, Maitland, 

J. E. Bowen, Laughman, " 

Margan Bass, Kissimmee, " 

B. C. Lanier, Leesburg, «* 

John Hunter, Winter Park, " 
H. Shipman, Haskell, deer, bear, turkeys, quails, ducks 

and salt-water fishing. 

Robert James, Emporia, ditto 

Alex. Brown, Martin. " 

W. J. McCullough, Boardman, " 

Frank Smith, St. James City " 

Jinks McCreary, Higly, " 

Baldwin Cassady, Lisbon, " 
W. H. Howell, Centre Hill, 

Ed. Brown, Dunedin, > " 

G. B. Lawson, Lake Maitland, " 
J. H. Maddox, Wauchula, j " 
Will Montgomery, Arcadia, ' " 
T. E. Fielder, Calvinia, «« 
W. F. Hays, Webster, " 
John Beidler, Gabrielle, " 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Fenner S. Jarvis, Haslin P. O., deer, bear, turkeys and 

quails. 

Robert Waterfield, Knotts Island, ditto 



Jas. Tooly, Belleport, 
W. C. " 



■Halsted, Currituck C. H., deer, turkeys, quails, 
ducks, salt-water fishing. 

Fred. Latham, Haslin, ditto 

VIRGINIA. 

M. Corbel, Virginia Beach, geese, brant, ducks, shore 

birds, quails, salt-water fishing. 

Captain R. E. Miles, Machipongo, ditto 

C. A. Spencer, Buckingham, " 

M. A. Barner, Clarksville, " 



A CONQUEROR CONQUERED. 
S. W. Foss, in the Yankee Blade. 

In southern archipelagoes he'd fought the 

bloody cannibal; 
He'd skinned and tanned the crocodile, and 

found him very tannable; 
Not a word of fear he'd uttered, not a word 

and not a syllable, 
When he killed the Bengal tiger, and he 

found him very killable. 

He claimed his strength was very great, 

for bears and lions suitable; 
He used to boot the grizzly bear, and found 

him very bootable. 
He claimed in killing monstrous snakes 

that he was very capable; 
No boa constrictor could escape, for he was 

unescapeable. 

In fighting hippopotami he said he was in- 
vincible; 

No jaguar could make him wince, because 
he wasn't winceable; 

He made the ramping elephant no longer 
recognizable, 

And pulverized the roaring bull, and found 
him pulverizable. 

Just then his wife came in and said, " I'd 

think it quite commendable 
If you'd come and 'tend the baby, and you'll 

find him very tendable." 
The way she took him by the ear will make 

this poem readable; 
She pulled him out and led him home, and 

found him very leadable. 



" Papa, you say 'at every time I breathe 
somebody dies." 

" Yes, Georgie." 

" Well— if I quit breathin' will all them 
folks quit dyin' ? " 



IN ANSWERING ADS ALWAYS 
MENTION RECREATION. 



xlii 



RECREA TION. 




A\ Unquestionably the 

% Finest Region for Quail 
k Shooting in America 

/J\ is that portion of the South reached by the 

| SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

h\ and its numerous branches* It traverses Virginia, North and 
/j\ South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, 
2J and Mississippi, and carries the sportsman to regions where 
;!; \ «y ^--. not only Quail are plentiful, but 

Deer, Wild Turkeys, Ducks, 
Geese, Brant, and smaller game 
as welL 

The accommodations for 
sportsmen throughout the South 
are uniformly good, and the 
Southern Railway offers them 
every facility for the transporta- 
tion of dogs, etc. 
/J\ A beautifully illustrated and carefully written book, 

/♦S entitled "Hunting and Fishing in the South," has just 
jL been issued, and will be sent to any address upon receipt 
/j\ of four cents in stamps* 

/j\ A* S. THWEATT, E. P. A. 

rl\ 27 J Broadway. New York 

/|\ W. A. TURK, G. P. A. 

/JfS "Washington, D. C. 




% 




RECREA TION. 



xliii 




cseraiiMT is a 4 



AND CAMP 

OUTFITS 

We manufacture the largest and most 
complete line of tents in the country, 
and our goods are celebrated for their 
wearing and waterproof qualities. 

Send 4 cents in stamps for our new 
40-page illustrated catalogue showing 
all styles of Tents and Camp furnitur e. 

GEO. B, CARPENTER & CO. 

202 to 2 JO S. Water Street, CHICAGO 

Established 1840. 



While on my annual hunting trip, in 
Wyoming, I met numerous parties, from 
" all over," and one and all spoke of Rec- 
reation as giving them more reliable in- 
formation than any other sportsmen's 
periodical. It is easy to tell a true from a 
" made up " story. If it comes from the 
pen of a man who has been there, not onry 
once, but year after year, you will know it 
by the ring of it. The man who does not 
love to hunt or fish cannot write a story 
that appeals to the hearts of those who do. 
He may write one that will pass with many 
people, but it lacks the true ring which the 
genuine lover of nature easily detects. The 
articles in Recreation are all written by 
men who know what they are talking about. 
D. L. Mechling, Denver, Col. 



The Manhattan Camera you sent me, 
for a club of subscribers, came to hand, and 
I am very much pleased with it. I expect to 
derive great pleasure from the use of it, 
this fall and winter. In a short time I will 
send you some more subscriptions and wish 
you would place them to my credit. I am 
going to work with a view of getting a 
gun. Recreation is growing more popu- 
lar in this section, every day. 

C. T. Stephenson, Dallas, Tex. 




To other skaters wear the 

1 Barney & Berry Skates. 

Highest Award World's Fair. 

■^™™^^™™"™^"^ Catalogue Free. 
BARNEY &BERRF, Springfield, Mass. 



BUT SHE DIDN'T. 

Oh, Harry came along the lane, 

And he was very late. 
He hurried on to catch the train 

And had no time to wait. 
He must hasten, but against the pane 

He caught a glimpse of Kate, 
And he didn't, he didn't, he didn't. 

Oh, Katie had her doughnuts cut, 
Her sponge was light as air; 

Her pies were in the oven shut 
And needed all her care. 

She must give them every moment, but 
She spied young Harry there, 

And she didn't, she didn't, she didn't. 

Oh, Harry stopped and spoke a word, 

And spoke it very low, 
And yet I think that Katie heard 

And still believed it so, 
Though all the while the youth averred 

That he would have to go, 
But he didn't, he didn't, he didn't. 

Oh, Katie said the fire was warm 
And she was " like to drop; " 

And Harry seemed to think his arm 
Was needed as a prop; 

And Katie was in such alarm 
She said that he must stop, 

But he didn't, he didn't, he didn't. 

And as he held her to his breast 

And thought of what he'd missed, 
With Katie waiting in her nest, 

Just longing to be kissed. 
He bent his head; her face was hid; 

I saw a flash and gleam 
Of lovely eyes, and then — he did — 

I thought the girl would scream, 
But you bet she didn't. 

— Exchange. 



IN ANSWERING ADS ALWAYS 
MENTION RECREATION. 



xliv 



RECREA TION. 



Miss Emma Libby, daughter of Captain 
Libby. of the Puget Sound Boat Company, 
recently caught 81 trout in 2 hours. The 
remarkable catch was made in Lake Cres- 
cent, South of Port Angeles, with a 7 ounce 
lod and flies tied by a local dresser. The 
trout were all of the steel-head variety, and 
none of them weighed less than a pound. 
The average weight was 3 pounds, which 
made a total of 243 pounds. The young 
lady is said to weigh less than 150, so that 
she caught nearly double her weight of fish 
during the short time she was at it. 

You can't expect anything better of some 
men, than that they should act the hog 
whenever they get a chance; but it would 
seem that the finer sensibilities with which 
women are endowed should cause them to 
shudder at the mere thought of such ruth- 
less slaughter as this. — Editor. 



I have just got back from North Bay, 
Canada, where I tried the aluminum auto- 
matic reel you sent me, for 10 subscriptions 
to Recreation. The reel is a dandy, and 
every angler should have one, especially 
when they are so easily gotten. I thank you 
for the promptness with which you sent it. 
Geo. S. Weaver, Scrubgrass, Pa. 



A League of American Sportsmen would 
be a good thing. Push it along. 

Paul W. Gardner, Honesdale, Pa. 



"Simply Phenomenal 



tt 



Lieut. F. C. WILSON 

Company C, First Bat. Inf., Ga. Vol. 

speaks thus of 

Kind's Semi = Smokeless 



♦♦♦ 



Powder,,. 



Lieut. Wilson won the 

WIMBLEDON CUP 

30 Shots, 1 ,000 Yards 

The only powder that gives highest velocity 
without stripping lead bullet. 

H Perfect Rifle ana Shot Gun Powder 

Ask for circular and name of dealer nearest you, 
who sells it. 

THE KING POWDER CO. 

CINCINNATI, O. 

Manufacturers also of KING'S SMOKELESS, QUICK- 
SHOT, and BLASTING POWDERS. 



MARLIN 



DOUBLE 
ACTION 



REVOLVERS 

All Parts of * 

DROP FORGED STEEL 

Perfect in Finish 

Unsurpassed 
in Accuracy 

MADE IN 32 and 38 CALIBRES, WITH Z% INCH BARREL 

Blued or Nickel Finish 




Send 



catXue The Marlin Fire Arms Co v New Haven, Conn. 



RECREA TION. 



xlv 



6 A flDPAT DPMFnV 4 



$ A GREAT REMEDY £ 




It is within the bounds of reason to say- 
that the greatest of all Dogf Remedies — the 
one with the most cures to its credit — the 
one which has been endorsed by the volun- 
tary testimonials of the largest number of 
competent authorities — is 

Sergeant's 
Condition Pills 



an alterative and a tonic for the treatment 
of Distemper, Mange, Loss of Appetite, 
Fevers, and General Debility. 

The pills are made from a formula by 
Mr* Polk Miller, known everywhere as a 
high authority* The combination of in- 
gredients is such that no possible injury can 
result to any dog to which they are given, 
and there is almost no ailment from which 
the canine race suffers that will not be 
helped or cured by them* The pills can be 
secured at nearly all drug stores, and are sup- 
plied through the depots mentioned below. The price is$l pet 
box, and on receipt of price they will be mailed anywhere, prepaid. 

The usual discount is allowed 
to keepers of large kennels when 



lots of a dozen boxes are ordered 
at a time. 

SERGEANT'S 
SURE SHOT 

destroys worms in dogs. It is 
used exclusively by many Ken- 
nel keepers who desire the best 
remedies they can buy. 

Sergeant's Carbolic Soft Soap 
does the same with fleas and lice 
as Sure Shot does for worms — 
kills them. 



Write for a free copy of Polk Mil- 
ler's new book, " Dogs— Their Ail- 
ments—How to Treat Them." 



W± menti 
Man 

&0> 



SUPPLY DEPOTS 

C. H. SQUIRES & SON, New York 
A. E. HAMILTON, Pensacola, Fla. 
E. C. MEACHAM ARMS CO., St. Louis, Mo. 
ROBERTS HARDWARE CO., Denver, Colo. 
EBERHART KENNELS, Cincinnati, 0. 
SCHMELZER ARMS CO., Kansas City, Mo. 
ANDREWS & MARTINIERE, Columbus, Ga. 
EDW. S. SCHMID, Washington, D.C 
SMITH, KLINE & FRENCH CO., Philadelphia 
HOLLISTER DRUG CO., Honolulu, H. I. 

Highly Endorsed by the Folio w= 
ing Well=Known Sportsmen 

Hon John S. Wise, Richmond, Va. 
A. Stucky, Pittsburg, Pa. 
E. N. Burr, Kansas City, Mo. 
Wm. Tell Mitchell, Lynchburg, Va. 
J. H. Whitman, Chicago, 111. 
T. H. Gibbs, Columbia, S. C. 
Amory R. Starr, Marshall, Texas 
Gen. W. B. Shattuc. Cincinnati, O. 
Paul Francke, St. Joseph, Mo. 
W. E. Stevens, Pontiac, Mich. 
Old Dominion, White Post, Va. 
Kit Killbird, Row Landing, La. 
H. W. Fuller, Louisville, Ky. 
And hundreds of others. 



Manufactured by the POLK MILLER DRUG CO., Richmond, Va. 




4 



xlvi 



RECREA TION. 



NEW MODEL REVOLVER 

Has important advantages over all other makes* Rebounding Lock* which obviates all liability 
of accidental discharge when closing* after discharging cylinder* Simple and superior method of 
holding cylinder to barrel. Can be removed instantly by pressing a catch in front of the cylinder* 




Workmanship unexcelled* All parts interchangeable, and made from drop forgings. Frame 
is made of cast steel. No malleable iron about it. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Mention Recreation. 



FOREHAND ARMS GO., Worcester, Mass. 

Given as a Premium for 5 Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation 



FISHERY CONGRESS. 

A National Fishery Congress will as- 
semble at Tampa, Fla., January 19, 1898. 

The National Fishery Commission of the 
United States will take a prominent part 
in the proceedings of this Assembly, and 
the Governors of the various States, and 
the Fishery Commissioners of same, are 
requested to send delegates. 

This Congress is called in the interest of 
Earth's highest civilization, believing that 
every effort made to increase the food sup- 
ply of mankind, and to suggest new fields 
for labor and new industries should be com- 
mended; hence the object and aim of this 
National Fishery Congress will be to dis- 
cuss and formulate plans for the propagation 
and preservation of fish, and all water prod- 
ucts of commercial value. It is also de- 
signed to have an exhibit of same. Parties 
thus interested are requested to make ex- 
hibits of dried and canned fish, turtles, 
crustaceans, sponges, oysters, oils, skins, 
and all appliances for catching and curing 
same; also nets, rods, hooks, etc. An Ex- 
position Building will be provided for this, 
and no charge will be made for space. Ad- 
dress A. Fiche, Fishery Exhibition, Tam- 
pa, Fla., for information as to space, etc. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's 
journal printed. I have taken several 
others but Recreation is superior to them 
all. 

People who have been here 50 years say 
they never have seen so many squirrels as 
this year. I have a hound pup, 4 months 
old, and want to run him on rabbits this 
winter. Will some reader of Recreation 
tell me how to train him? 
R. J. Boynton, Hillsboro Bridge, N. H. 



" Florinda has queer ideas." 

" What is she thinking of now? " 

" She has decorated her boudoir with 

photographs of some men she escaped 

marrying." 



" No man with a family on his hands 
should talk of going to the Klondike." 

" That's the very kind of man who should 
talk about it." 

"Why?" 

" So his family will pet him to death, to 
keep him from going." 



For Sale: Old reliable Sharps sporting 
rifle, chambered for 45-70 and 45-100 shell. 
In perfect condition. Address L. Pardee, 
Austin, Cooke Co., 111. 



R EC RE A TION. 



xlvii 



"THE LITTLE FINGER DOES IT" 

The Fisherman's Automatic Reel 



SEND FOR 
CATALOG 




Every Sportsman 
Should Have One 



Mention Recreation. 



What we claim for 
the Automatic Reel 



FIRST — It will wind up the 
line a hundred times as 
fast as any other reel in 
the world. 

SECOND— It will wind up 
the line slowly if the 
angler chooses. 

THIRD — No fish can ever 
get slack line with it. 

FOURTH — It will save 
more fish than any other 
reel. 

FIFTH — It will prevent 
tips, lines, and snells 
from being broken by 
large fish. 

SIXTH — The reel is ma- 
nipulated entirely by the 
hand that holds the rod. 

SEVENTH— It enables the 
angler and makes it de- 
sirable to use lighter tips. 



xlviii 



RECREATION. 



f Press Button finite 

FOR 

Hunting, Fishing and Camping 



Can be Opened Instantly 
with One Hand by Slightly 
Pressing the Button : : : : 



Our 4-inch or 5-inch jack-knife is in- 
valuable in emergencies when you need a 
strong knife quickly. Press button and 
blade is open for use. 

Four-inch Blade, Stag Handle $1.00 

Five-inch Blade, Stag Handle, .... 1.25 

SENT POSTPAID 



LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S 

POCKET KNIFE 

AS CUT 

In Sterling Silver, $1.75 

In Pearl, Plain, I#50 

In Ivory, Plain, J>2 5 

In Stag, Plain, loo 

In Ebony, Plain, IOO 

SENT POSTPAID 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOG 





" Marriage," said the old bachelor, " is 
but a lottery after all." 

" There's where you're off," replied 
Henry Peck. " If you draw a blank in a 
lottery you can tear it up, and that's the 
end of it." — Chicago Record. 



IN ANSWERING ADS ALWAYS 
MENTION RECREATION. 



" I should think it would tire those Klon- 
dike miners to carry home such heavy loads 
of gold nuggets." 

" No, I think not; most of them are mar- 
ried men — used to lugging coal." 



" What a fine lot of Indian curios Miss 
Flighty has collected." 

" Yes; and they look as if she had made 
them herself." 




A Trial will Convince You that 

GOLDEN SCEPTRE 



SMOKING TOBACCO 

I Is Almost Perfection. We will send on receipt 
I of 10c. a sample to any address. Prices of Golden 

I Sceptre, 1 lb., $1.30 ; U lb., 40cts., postage paid. 



CATALOGUE FREE.- 



SURBRUG, 159 Fulton Street, New York City. 



RECREATION, 



xlix 



m mm 

Piano 



^ «ae STYLE 7 




You do not have to 
pay an extravagant 
price for a first- 
class piano ««««««« 



In justice to your- 
self write for prices 
of the Wing Piano 
before you buy «««« 




The Instrumental Attachments 

imitates perfectly the tone of the Mandolin, Guitar, Harp, Zither and Banjo, 
giving the effect of an entire orchestra of these instruments playing in concert 
with the piano*** J* <£> & <£ 

SENT ON TRIAL « ^ e w ^ senc * * ms P iano » or y° ur choice ©f four other styles, 

— to any part of the United States On Trial (all freights 

paid by us), allow ample time for a thorough examination and trial in the home, and, 
if the instrument is at all unsatisfactory, we will take it back at our own expense. No 
conditions are attached to this trial. We ask no advance payment; no deposit. We 
-»ay all freights in advance. 

OLD INSTRUMENTS EXCHANGED 
EASY PAYMENTS 

OUR BOOK should be in the hands of every one who intends to buy a piano. Tt contains rnajjy 
valuable hints and instructions, and tells a great many things every buyer ought to know. We Will ssm 
it free with our catalogue to any one who writes us. 

WING & SON, <« - d ««E£S£' »• Y ' «* 



RECREATION. 



lu IttuskoKa and midland 
£ake$ Resorts 

Reached only by the 

Grand Trunk Railway System 

Is the Paradise for not only hunters.fishermen, and canoe- 
ists, but also those in search of health, where comfort 
and pleasure can be obtained economically. 

The woodland and lake scenery would satisfy thfe most 
critical tourist. 

Camping outfits can be purchased cheaply, or guides, 
thoroughly acquainted with this region, fully equipped 
for camping, can be secured readily. 

Parties can be furnished with names of guides, and by 
communicating with them, make all necessary arrange- 
ments in advance. 

The following fish and game, in season, are to be 
found in abundance, the variety of which is not surpassed 
by any other sporting region in the world : 

Fish.— Bass, pickerel, brook trout, lake trout, white- 
fish, perch, sunfish, salmon, trout, sturgeon, catfish, 
herring, and muskalonge. 

Game.— Deer, partridge, rabbits, pigeons, ducks.geese, 
plover, bear, woodcock, snipe, grouse, and moose. 

A few of the other Principal Resorts.— Andros- 
coggin Lakes, the White Mountains, the salmon re- 
sorts of Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, 
Lake St. John region, the River St. Lawrence, the 
Thousand Islands. 



...Co "tot" Pleasure Rtsortt of... 

Cexa$ ana Gulf of Mexico 



TAKE 



For descriptive book showing routes and rates, apply 
to M. 0- Dickson, D.P.A., Toronto, Ont.; D. 0. Pease, 
D.P.A., Montreal, P.O.; L. R. Morkow, C.P.A., Chicago, 
111.; R. McC. Smith, S.P.A., Cincinnati, O. 



Chab. M. Hays, Geo B. Reeve. W. E. Davis, 

General Manager, Gen. Traffic Manager, G. P. & T. A., 

Montreal, P. Q. Montreal, P. Q. Montreal, P. Q. 

Frank P. Dwxeb, E. P. Agent, 273 Broadway, New York. 




m 

m 



2,000 
Miles 



& OF J8 




£££ varied scenery ; mountains, hills, 

VV» : valleys, rivers, lakes, parks, can- 

:*-** yons — found between St. Paul and 

SK Portland, Oregon. 
3sSS 

w 






m 



All the best cities of the north- 
west reached via this line. 

Pullman sleeping cars, both first- 
class and tourist, and through din- 
ing-cars, on all overland trains. 

FINEST HUNTING AND 
FISHING RESORTS 



Send si x cents /or our new book 
WONDERLA ND ' 97 



CHA5. S. 
General Pass. Ant. 



FEE 
St. Paul, Minn. 



vs. 



Via CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, or 
ST. LOUIS 

WAGNER BUFFET SLEEPERS 

FREE "KATY" CHAIR CARS 

For further information, address 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, Gen. East. Agt. 
309 Broadway, New York 



UNEQUALED 
ATTRACTIONS 

ON THE LINE OF THE 

Union pacific 

FOR TOURISTS 

It traverses the Grandest Scenery ef 
the Rocky Mountains, and reaches all 
the Health and Pleasure Resorts of 
the Mid-Continent. 



<-c$**> 



Sportsmen 



will find in scores of local- 
ities along this line game 
worthy of their skill, such as 
Bear, Mountain Lion, Coyotes, Elk, Deer, Ante- 
lope, Mountain Sheep, Feathered Game of all 
kinds. And everywhere are Beautiful Streams 
well stocked with Trout. 



'm '&i &i '& rc sw i% t% '&% 1% '$$ £& £&&£ 

yj>. <{*! .»'**■ y>» .-**■ '■» •■ ••<**• ><**« -* / -> > - yj *- yj> - ***• <***• *** 



For Gun Club Rules, Game Laws, and any in- 
formation relative to localities for Hunting, or tor 
information in regard to the UNION PACIFIC 
SYSTEM, call on or address any General or 
Traveling Agent of this Company. 

R. TENBR0ECK, Gen'l Eastern Agent, 

287 Broadway, New York City 

E. L. LOMAX, 
Manager, Gaa'l Pats. * Tkt. Aj*. 

Omaha, Neb. 



MS \ K. DICKINSON, 
¥S*. Gen'l liana: 



RECREA TION. 



li 




20 BOOKS - * 

ON 20 DIFFERENT SUBJECTS, 
BUT ALL RELATING TO SOME 
DELIGHTFUL PHASE OF 
AMERICAN TRAVEL, VIA 
"AMERICA'S GREATEST RAIL- 
ROAD." 

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE SENT 
FREE, POST-PAID, ON RECEIPT 
OF A 1-CENT STAMP BY GEORGE 
H. DANIELS, GENERAL PASSENGER 
AGENT, NEW YORK CENTRAL 4. 
HUDSON RIVER RAILROAD, GRAND 
CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK. 



Travelers 



Seeking " a good time " or renewed health naturally turn seaward. 
In winter the favorite — almost the only — ocean resort is far-famed 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

What other seaside city can boast a " season" lasting all the 
year 'round ? 

In hotels there is always a choice. Let us send you a book con- 
cerning the one we know most about. 



.J. D. SOUTHWICK 

Manager 



The Shelburne 



Hens Make Money 

k under proper conditions. Those condi- 
'tions are defined in our MAMMOTH 

NEW POULTRY BOOK and CATA- 
LOG for 1898. Bigger & better than 
ever before. Printed in colors; cuts and 
description of all leading breeds of fowls; 
poultry boose plans, tested remedies, 
prices on poultry, eggs, etc. Worth $5, but 
sent postpaid for 15 cents in stamps ereoln. 
TDlie J. -OT. jMtiller Co. 

Box 47, Freeport, III. 




ALWAYS MENTION RECREA- 
TION WHEN ANSWERING ADS. 



NO BARBERS THERE. 

" My son will make money when he 
comes from Alaska, whether he finds gold 
or not." 

" How will he make it? " 

" Think what elegant football hair he 
will have, by that time." 



A Grand Upright Piano, listed at $750, 
for 200 yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 



lii RECREATION. 



"Be Careful! 

Your rod won't 
Stand it" 




"O, yes it will — with a big W,— for it's a 
6 Bristol' and will hold anything that was 
ever hooked: I don't depend on wooden 
rods now-a-days, for they are lacking in 
backbone and warp so badly." 

All fishermen who use a Bristol Steel 
Fishing Rod feel just as sure as this 
" Bristol ' enthusiast, and know from 
experience that it is the banner rod for all 
'round fishing. 

Our Catalogue " R ' will tell you all 
about our seventeen different styles and 
sizes — weighing from 6*4 to n^ oz. 
Some of our rods are in the regular jointed 
style, others are made telescopic. 

The Horton Manufacturing Co. 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



Mention Recreation 



RECREA TION. 



liii 



For nearly 50 Years the name 



"n awiport 



has been identified with 
the manufacture of 




AUTOMATIC EJECTOR 

Our present line is complete and varied and shows the result of years of experience 

For catalogues and information address 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO. 

Mention Recreation NORWICH, COIN IN., U. ^. A. 

EJe f or J r T ^m^ flood flews for Sportsmen 

^2^*^ ^■B^^^ Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 

lllXllYy ^^WmS^ ^^^ within the reach of every sportsman 

OUR NEW EJECTOR MOVEMENT 

Has only two pieces : One in the 
~ ,JKM$r^^^^=^m^9±^ Hammer, One in 

^:^^^^,^^^ the Frame 

■ ; ; ^M||jpSKiSgW We have decided to meet 

~---- -J the demand for medium 

price Ejectors, and are now 

prepared to accept orders 

for all grades of our bam- 

. merless guns fitted with 

TENS OF THOUSANDS IN USE ^HlllP ^| | Ejectors. 

Send for Catalogue 

LEFEVER ARMS CO. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mention Recreation 

Date, 1897 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 19 West 24th St., New York: 

Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me RECREATION 

for one year beginning with number. 

Name, „ „ 

Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN. 




liv 



RECREA TION. 



New Ithaca ^ Guns 



W Self compensating, 
Jff taking up wear 

¥ 




i 

¥ 

Bored ¥ 

FOR BLACK DAN 
NITRO POWDERS 

Close and Hard Shooting Guns 
at long range a specialty 



Price but a little more than one-half that of any other goo< 

warranted in the most positive terms, shooting included 

ITHACA GUN COMPANY, ITHACA, N. Y. 



Send for circular 

Mention Recreation 



Manufacturers of fine Hammer 
and Hammerless Guns 




FOR FIELD OR FOR TRAP, 
FOR POT HUNTING OR FUN, 
NO SPORTSMAN IS EQUIPPED 
WITHOUT A SYRACUSE GUN 



" MORE TRUTH 
THAN POETRY" 



«+£ 




We do not say that SYRACUSE HAMMERLESS GUNS 

Are as Good " as any gun in the market. 




Their simplicity of construction and superiority of finish stamp them "BETTER" for 
practical all-round work than any gun in the market. The "old, old story " but, 
nevertheless, substantiated by every man who ever drew a Syracuse to his shoulder. 




SYRACUSE ARMS CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. S. A. 




Sole Agents, HERMANN BOKER & CO., 101 Duane Street, New York City 



RECREA TION. 



W 




Forehand Arms Co. s 

EJECTOR AND NON-EJECTOR 

HAMMERLESS DOUBLE GUN 




LATEST MODEL 



Read what men 
say of the- 

Forehand 

who are using it 



We get 
Thousands 
of such 

Testimonials — 
all Unsolicited 



Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y., Dec. 6, '97. 

Forehand Arms Co. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — Some time ago I received 
one of your Grade O guns, as premium for a 
club of subscribers to Recreation, and it is as 
good a gun as I ever shot. In fact I would 
not want a better one at any price. Have 
made some wonderfully long shots, on ruffed 
grouse, and whenever I hit them they dropped 
like a log. As for workmanship and materials, 
the gun is all any one could ask for. 

I can recommend your guns to any one 
wanting a high-grade arm. 

Yours truly, 

John W. Ackerman. 



We challenge competition in Beauty, Workmanship, Simplic- 
ity of Mechanism, Shooting Qualities and Price, We target 
all our guns with nitro powder. For Catalogue, address 



FOREHAND ARMS CO., WORCESTER, MASS. 



lvi 



R EC RE A TION. 



DOG 



COMMON SENSE OF LifV/VI DOCTORING" 
A CONCISE AND UP-TO-DATE POPULAR TREATISE 
PRICE (MAIL FREE), 25 CENTS 



DOC AND POULTRY 
8UPPLIES 



Order through your Dealer and send for catalogue to 
SPRATTS PATENT LIMITED 






245 EAST 56th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

©an Francisco branch 

1320 valencia street 



DALY 



Three-Barrel Hammer Guns 
Three-Barrel Hammerless Guns 
$90 to $200 

HAMMERLESS GUNS • 
$120 to $375 

With or without AUTOMATIC EJECTOR 



At the big Thanksgiving-Day Shoot of 
the Crescent Athletic Club, Brooklyn, the 
three Silver Cups, presented by the Club, 
were won with 



Daly Guns and Walsrode Powder 



SCHOVERLING, DALY & GALES 

.302 Broadway, New York 




RECREA TION. 



lvii 



44 



Stevens Favorite" Rifles 




«• Stevens 
Favorite" 
No. 17. 



No. 17. With plain sights, .... $6.00 
No. 18. With Vernier and Beach sights, 8.50 
For .22, .25, and .32 rim=fire cartridges. 

Weight, 4$ lbs., 22-inch barrel, "Take Down" 
model. Stevens are the most accurate rifles made. 

Boys! ask your dealer for "Stevens Favorite. " If he can't supply you, don't accept any other; we'll 
sell one direct, express paid, at these prices. Send for small-bore cartridge circular. ^ 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL GOMPflNY, Box 4M,Ghicopee Falls, Mass. 



MR. FRED GILBERT 



In the Contest for the 

E. C. Cup 

Made the following score: 

48 out of 50 

UNKNOWN ANGLES 

48 out of 50 

EXPERT RULES 

46 out of 50 

DOUBLES 



DHCE USED 



DuPont 

Smokeless 

Powder 



# 



E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS * CO. 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 



lviii 



RECREA TION. 




What's 
the Use 

of walking when you 
can get a first-class, high- 
grade bicycle for nothing? 

How? 

By getting 75 subscriptions for 

Recreation 

If you live in a town of 3,000 
or more, and if you are a hustler 
you can get these in 2 days. 

I can give you the names of 20 
people who did this in J 896, and 
who now have their wheels. 

Write for particulars. 

RECREATION 

19 West 24th Street 
New York 




Among exhibitors at the Fourth Annual 
Sportsmen's Exposition, to be held at 
Madison Square Garden in January, are: 

E. I. Dupont de Nemours & Co 
Strauss Tire Co.; Universal Trading Co. 
Whitely Exerciser Co.; Bonsilate Box Co. 
T. J. Clements; Maine Exhibit; W. W 
Hart & Co.; L. C. Bliss & Co.; W. & S 
Electric Dumb Bell Co.; Wing & Son; M 
Hallanan; Tatham & Bros.; Peters & 
Drake; Lindsay Bicycle Co.; Union Me- 
tallic Cartridge Co.; Savage Repeating 
Arms Co.; Truscott Boat Co.; Recrea- 
tion; Osgood Cycle Co.; Park Row Cycle 
Co.; Spencer Brake Co.; Le Roy Shot & 
Lead Works; Bayvelgere Bicycle Co.; 
Standard Novelty Co.; Marine Vapor 
Engine Co.; Defender Cycle Co.; Win- 
chester Repeating Arms Co. ; L. C. Jando'rf 
& Co.; Gas Engine & Power Co.; Moxie 
Nerve Food Co.; Dreadnaught Tire Co. 



I want to tell you where I saw my first 
copy of Recreation. It was in the pump 
station of No. 1 shaft, in the famous Drum 
Lummond of this town, the largest gold 
quartz mine in the world. It was at the 
1,600 foot level — farther ii, the bowels of 
the earth than you probably thought Rec- 
reation would ever get. 

Walter I. Shay, Marysville, Mont. 



BOOKS 



By C. O. SHIELDS 

(coquina) 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts and Characteristics. 
How, When and Where to Hunt it. 8vo, 600 
pages, 80 illustrations. Cloth, $350 ; Half Mor- 
occo, $5.00 ; Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur 
Photography, Hunting and Fishing, with Special 
Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, the Buf- 
falo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 
Deer ; also on T routing in the Rocky Mountains ; 
on a Montana Roundup ; Life Among the Cow- 
boys, etc. i2tno, 300 pages, 75 illustrations. Cloth, 
$2 ; Half Morocco, $3. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES 

How, When and Where to Angle for them. 8vo, 
400 pages, 50 illustrations. Cloth, $2.50; Half Mor- 
occo, $4. 

HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST 

(Rustlings in the Rockies) 
Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and 
Stream. i2mo, cloth. Over 300 pages. Illustrated. 
Price, 7s cents. » 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, 
Utility, Breeding, Training, Diseases and Kennel 
Management of all Breeds of Dogs. 8vo, 650 pages, 
100 illustrations. Cloth, $3.50; Half Morocco, $5; 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sports- 
men. i2mo, 200 pAges, 30 illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 

THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with 
the Nez Perce Indians in the Big Hole Basin, Mon- 
tana, August 9, 1877. i2mo, I50 pages. Profusely 
illustrated. Cloth, $1. 
These books will be mailed, post-Paid, on receipt 

of price, by the author. 

Q. O. SHIELDS 

19 West 24th St., New Y«rk 



RECREA TION. 



lix 



Some Rare * 
Opportunities 

These goods are all new, and will be 
shipped direct from factory. Prices 
named are those at which manufact- 
urers and dealers usually sell. Here is 
a good chance to get 



Tree of 
Cost 



A BOOK 

A GUN 

A CAMERA 
A SLEEPING BAG 
A FISHING ROD 

A REEL 

A TENT 

A BICYCLE 

Subscriptions need not all be sent at 
once. They can be sent in instalments as 
taken and credit will be given on account. 
When the required number is obtained 
the premium earned will be shipped. 

J9 West 24th Street 
New York 



"Recreation" 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



To any person sending me 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation at 
$i each, I will send a copy of Hunting in 
the Great West, paper ; or a Czar Camera, 
listed at $i ; or an Ingersoll Watch or 
Cyclometer, each listed at $i. 

THREE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
The Battle of the Big Hole, cloth. 

FOUR subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Camping and Camping Outfits, cloth. 

FIVE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Cruising in the Cascades, cloth ; or a Will- 
sie Pocket Camera, listed at $5. It makes 
a picture 2^x2§ inches and can be loaded 
with 24 cut films. 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
American Game Fishes, cloth ; or a Baby 
Hawkeye Camera, listed at $6. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Game of North America, or of 
The American Book of the Dog, cloth ; or a 
Cyclone Camera, listed at $6 ; or an Aus- 
tralian Mosquito-proof Tent, listed at $7. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a Pocket 
Kodak, made by the Eastman Kodak Co., 
and listed at $5 ; or a Water-proof Wall 
Tent, 7ix7i, and listed at $7.50. 



TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a single-shot 
Davenport Rifle; or a Fishing rod, or a 
Yawman and Erbe Automatic Reel, listed 
at $9 ; or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, listed 
at $10; or a No. 10 Gramophone, listed 
at $10. 

TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Man- 
hattan Improved Hand Camera, made by 
the Manhattan Optical Co., and listed at 
$12 ; or an Australian Mosquito-proof 
Tent, listed at $12.50 ; or a Stevens Dia- 
mond Pistol, listed at $5 to $6. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Davenport Single-barrel, breech-loading 
Ejector Shotgun, listed at $10 ; or a 
Camera, listed at $6 to $10; or a Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag, complete with canvas cover, 
listed at $16 ; or a Kozy Camera, listed at 
$10 ; or a No. 2 Bullet Camera, listed at 
$10 ; or a Stevens Diamond Pistol, listed 
at $7.50 to $8.50; or a No. 17 Stevens 
Favorite Rifle, listed at $6. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, with 
Elgin Movement, listed at $20; or a Marlin 
Repeating Rifle, listed at $14 or less ; or 
a No. 4 Bullseye Camera, made by the 
Eastman Kodak Co., and listed at $12 ; 
or a No. 18 Stevens Favorite Rifle, with 
open sights, listed at $8.50 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. 4 Bullet Camera, made by the East- 
man Kodak Co., and listed at $15 ; or 
a Gramophone, listed at $25 ; or an Aus- 
tralian Mosquito-proof Tent, listed at $25 ; 
or a Marlin Repeating Rifle, listed at $18 
or less ; or a Shattuck Double-barrel 
Breech-loading Shot-gun, listed at $25 ; 
or a No. 19 Stevens Favorite Rifle, 
listed at $9.00 ; or a Water-proof Tent, 
gfxgf, made by Derby, Abercrombie & Co. 

THIRTY subscriptions at $1 each, a New 
Haven Arms Co.'s Double-barrel Breech- 
loading Shot-gun, listed at $30 ; or a 
Marlin Repeating Rifle, listed at $21 
or less ; or any Stevens Rifle or Pistol, 
listed at $20 or less. 

FORTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Syracuse, 
Grade 0,oran Ithaca, quality, No. I plain, 
Double-barrel Harnmerless Breech-load- 
ing Shot-gun, worth $35 ; or a Camera, 
worth $25 ; or a Marlin Repeating Rifle, 
listed at $24 or less; or any Stevens 
Rifle or Pistol, listed at $28 or less. 

FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Marlin 
Rifle, with fancy curled walnut stock, 
pistol grip, checkered fore-end, hand- 
somely engraved, half octagon, half 
magazine, with take down, listed at $50. 

SEVENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Safety Bicycle, listed at $75 to $100. 

ONE HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, 
a fine Lefever Harnmerless Gun, listed 
at $85. 



Ix 



RECREA TION. 



" Sjf.WJiVXXSiSSi 



v.v.i^v>^.v\^vi^i.^\\v:^%Vi.v.v.'. , . , . , i , >'.'.'.v. , ; , . ,, . , .v: , .rifav. , >v.v> , >..vv: , .v.-: , .'. , ^ z3a; 





Strength 

from 

Strength- 




is the 

concentrated nutriment 
of prime lean beef 
further strengthened in 
muscle-forming constit- 
uents by the addition of 
^ powdered beef, the whole 
*~ being appetizingly spiced 
and seasoned and ready 
for immediate use with 
hot or cold water. 



7/frt?w£K both meatand drink.- a foe to fati g ue 

/^>""^ which gives added strength and vitality to all who use it. 

To be had of all grocers and druggists. 

Hie interesting little pamphlet" Various Views on Vigoraf'is mailed for the asking 

Armour & Company 

Chicago. r\ 




....... !■. ■■■ •K-.i-rrzrtrar.i.: 



1 



44 Shots that are 
Heard Around the 
World" in 1897 



(oi^CORD Bk idgE - 
^APRIb 19™ 1775. 



are made with 



U. M. C. 

Ammunition 

Its reliability has won 
universal recognition 



Send for complete catalogue of 

Cartridges and Loaded Shells 



The Union Metallic 
Cartridge Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

313 Broadway 425 Market Street 
New York San Francisco, Cal. 




Remington Hammerless 




Diana's Triumph 



Perfect in Balance 

Strong in Workmanship 

Simple in Action 



The invaluable result of nearly 
a century's mechanical experi- 
ence. New illustrated catalogue 
mailed free. 



Remington Arms Co. 

Ilion, N. Y. 
425 Market St., San Francisco 313 Broadway, New York 



& 



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.*-■-..<«' 




the World's Rifle Record 



? 
¥ 

* 



at Flying Targets 
— 979 out of iooo — 
was made with. . . 



* 
* 

* 



Winchester Gallery 
Ammunition 



.and., 



4 

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§ 

I 



V 

¥ 
¥ 
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fc 




Adoi.ph Toepperwein, of Texas, Champion 
Rifle Shot of the World at Flvine Targfets. 



Winchester Model 
1890 Rifles 

Do As The Champions Do. Shoot 

Winchester Ammunition 

And Winchester Guns 

FREE: Send Name and Address on a Postal for New 
148-Page Illustrated Catalogue. Postage Free. 

Winchester Repeating J\rm% £a 

New Haven, Conn. 



" 









^ 




Follow the Man 



P. 31. A 1897. 



who minds his P's and Q's, 
He's the man who looks at 

Prices and Quality. Clipper prices are always deter' 

mined and set after Clipper quality has been decided upon. 

No cheap, shoddy material or workmanship 

enters into any part of a Clipper 

bicycle. No bicycle 

need to cost a 

single dollar 

more than the 

best Clipper. 

Every Clipper hi' 

cycle sold carries with it a 

name plate and a guarantee 

backed by a concern with ample means 

and a desire to treat all customers fairly 

and honestly 5 a concern on whose cornerstone 

of success is engraved the word, " Equality." 

If you don't know about Clipper bicycles, ask some one 

who does. Possibly it might pay you. " He who knows, 

and knows that he knows, he is wise ; follow him." 

MADE BY THE 

GRAND RAPIDS CYCLE CO., Grand Rapids, Mich. 







»<ij 



A 
A 

A 
A 
A 
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$ 

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:i,i)i»;»^]i)i)i)i)ift^iM^)»9»^)if>:<<M<<<<<M<^<^<<^<«(<«<» 



Trow Directory, Priming and Bookbindinq Company. 



VOLUME VIII. 
NUMBER 2 



FEBRUARY, 1898 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




This issue of Recreation is 65,000 Copies. Books, Printer's Bills, Post- 
office Receipts, and News Co.'s Orders shown to any one asking to see them. 



t 
t 






Throat ease and 
Breath Perf ume * 

Good for Old and Young 

At all -dealers or ; SEN-SEN Co, 

vnt on receipt of". Dept a.. 

r k in stamps ROCHESTER, RY 



THB-^ 



ONEITA KNITTING MILLS 



PAt APL 25T« 1893. 



Elastic Ribbed 

Union Suits 

are complete under- 
garments, covering 
the entire body like 
an additional skin. 
Perfectly elastic, fit- 
ting like a glove, but 
softly and without 
pressure. No but- 
tons down the front. 
Made for Men, Wom- 
en, and Young People, 
Most convenient to put 
on or off, being entered 
at top and drawn on 
like trousers. "With no 
other kind of underwear 
can ladies obtain such 
perfect fit, for dresses, or 
wear comfortably so 
small a corset. 

Send for illustrated booklet L 

Office: i Greene St. 
New York 




STOP THE GAME!!! 

NO! 



KILL THE UMPIRE ? 



Simply build a PAGE FENCE around the premises 
and you've got 'em. No obstruction to the view. 
Holds Buffalo, Deer, Elk, anything. 



+ Wri *f f or * articulars PAGE WOVEN WIRE FENCE CO., Adrian, Mich. ^ 

^r Mention Recreation. ^F 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1896, by G. O. Shields 

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



19 West 24.TH Street, 

New York, 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 

" After the Report the Elk Made a few Jumps and Fell Dead." Fronti 

In the Olympic Mountains. Illustrated C. C. Making 

Hunting with a Camera, III. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 

A Bear and Some Scared Hunters. Illustrated C. G. Shepard 

Hunting Indians in a Fog. Illustrated Lieut. C. B. Hardin, U.S.A. 

To Save the Muskalonge. Illustrated Ben S. Dean 

An Albino Deer. Illustrated W. H. N. 

Canadian Fishing. Illustrated John Boyd 

Elkland, VI. Illustrated Ernest Seton Thompson 

Among the Reeds. Illustrated Wilmot Townsend 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition A. J. Stone 

At Round Lake, in the Adirondacks Seaver A. Miller 

A Cute Old Fox Eugene C. Derby 

The Associated Pirates E. V. Keyser 

The Wolf Question Ernest Seton Thompson 



From the Game Fields 128 

Fish and Fishing 141 

Guns and Ammunition 145 

Natural History 149 

Editor's Corner 153 



The League of American Sportsmen 

Bicycling 

Canoeing 

Book Notices 

Amateur Photography 



Page 

spiece 

87 

99 

103 

105 
in 

113 
113 
117 
119 
121 
122 
123 

125 
126 

154 
156 

159 
161 
164 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, 1894. 




" I consider 



r &czccfcnf 



a peerless dentifrice/' 

Maxine Elliott. 



fo Among other beautiful and accom 
plished women who have freely com 
mended this famous dentifrice are 




Sarah Bernhardt 
Marie Studholme 
Clara Lipman 
Emma Abbott 



Marie Aimee 
Rose Coghlan 
Marie Roze 
Alwina Valleria 



New York 



For a sample of Van Buskirk's fragrant Sozodont 
send three cents (postage), mentioning this maga- 
zine, to P. O. Box 247, New York City. 

HALL & RUCKEL 
Sole Proprietors (Established 1848: 




11 



RECREA TION. 



GAS ENGINE & POWER CO. 

"«_CH ARLES U SEABURY & CO., b«i*„ „i 




The Only Naphtha 
...Launch... 

High-class Steam Yachts, Sail Yachts, Electric 
Launches, Dinghys, Gigs and Yacht Tenders, 
Seabury's Water Tube Boilers, Marine Engines 



.. 


■ 








• 




« 

■ \ 










■ 


\ 




1 






hfg^L 


*»<11£l^Mi 


\— — _^M| J 


rjjScm 


ITfe 


-, — "*"; 



Storage Basin and Ship's ways* Overhauling: of all kinds 
promptly done. Charters and Insurance. Boats bought and 
sold on commission ♦ 



CORRESPONDENCE 
SOLICITED .... 



Send ten cents in stamps for catalogues, to downtown office, 
50 BROADWAY, or to factory at 



MORRIS HEIGHTS, New York City 



RECREA TION. 



111 





THE 



Big-Game Killer 



Leg of an animal before and 
after being shot with an ex- 
panding bullet cartridge fired 
from a 303 Caliber ♦ ♦ ♦ 



Savage 
Repeating Rifle 




AFTER 



THE BULLET 



Catalogue on Application. 



SAVAGE ARMS CO. 



Utica, N. Y 




THE FINEST YET" 

CURTICE BROTHERS 

Blue Label Soups 

represent all that's 
good in soups, 
made in nineteen 
varieties from best 
buyable materials, 
carefully prepared 
in cleanly kitchens. 
If you cannot find 
these goods with 
your grocer we will 
send you, charges 
prepaid, upon re- 
ceipt of ten 2-cent 
stamps, a full-size 
pint can of any one 
of the following va- 
rieties : 

Beef, Bouillon, Consomme, Chicken Gumbo, 
Chicken, Clam Broth, Clam Chowder, Juli- 
enne, Mock Turtle, Mutton Broth, Mullaga- 
tawny. Ox-tail. Pea, Printanier, Tomato, 
Tapioca Crecy, Vegetable. 

Address Department " D " 

Curtice Brothers Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Write us for Booklet "From Tree to Table " 
descriptive of our full line Canned Goods, 
Preserves, Jellies, Jams, and Blue Label 
Ketchup, sending us name of your local grocer 





(JlMATE 



IfSALT RIVER 

VALfcE/of 

Arizona And the 
various 

HEALTH RESORTS 
KNEW MEXICO 

ARE UNRIVALED FOR THE RELIEF 
OF CHRONIC LONG AND THROAT DIS- 
EASES. HERE ARE FOUND PURE DRY AIR, 
EQUABLE TEMPERATURE AND CONSTANT SUNSHINE. 
THE ITErAS OF ALTiTUDe. TEMPERATURE. HUHIDITY. HOT SPRINGS 
SANATORIunS.GOST OF LIVING. MEDICAL ATTENDANGE,SOClAL 
ADVANTAGES. ETC, ARE CONCISELY TREATED IN DESCRIPTIVE 
PAMPHLETS l5SUEDBYTnE SANTA FE ROUTE 
PMY5ICIAN6 ARE RESPECTFULLY A5KED TO PLACE T/-U& 
LITERATURE IN THE HANDS OF INVALID5. 
ADDRES5 W.J. BLACK. 

6.P.A,A.T.6S.F. Ry, 

TOPEK A, KANSAS. 

or C.A.H1GGINS, 

A.G.P. A., CHICAGO. 



IV 



RECKEA TION. 



4S 



AS 

AS 

/IS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 



Smokeless Powders in Rifles 






have come into general use with wonderful rapidity, and many riflemen have tested 
KfS the popular 30=30 MARLIN, getting with soft-nosed bullets results like these 

30-30-170 Marlin. 



30-30-170 Marlin. 





BEFORE. 

AFTER. 

But many men have found smokeless cartridges too expensive and too powerful 
for all occasions, and want a repeater in which black powder cartridges can ordinarily 
be used. THE 32=40 MARLIN and THE 38=55 MARLIN are now made of 
our "SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL/' so that smokeless powder and jacketed 
bullets can be used in them when desired. The 32-40 smokeless, soft-nosed, gives 
results like these 



32-40-165 Marlin. 



32-40-165 Marlin. 





AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 
AS 

f 
AS 

AS 

AS 

AS 

AS 

AS 

AS 

/AN 



BEFORE. 

AFTER. 

THE OLD GUARD will be interested to know that all 1895 MODEL MARLINS 
have our SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL, so that smokeless powder and jacketed 
bullets can also be used in MARLIN REPEATERS of the following sizes : 



38-56 40-65 40-70 

The 45-calibres give results like these 

45-90-300 Marlin. 
45-90-300 Marlin. 



40-82 45-70 45-90 



45-70-432 Marlin. 




BEFORE. 




45-70-432 Marlin. 



AFTER. 




BEFORE. 



AFTER. 



SEE THAT YOUR BARREL IS STAMPED 



a 



Special Smokeless Steel 



» 



We will mail you our 198-page Sportsman's Guide, giving full details and one thousand other 
interesting facts which all sportsmen should know, if you will send us stamps to pay postage. 



THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



CO. 



**€* 



RECREA riON. 






^^ 






DON'T PUT YOUR GUN or RIFLE AWAY 

without giving it a good coating of 

marlin Rust Rcpeller 

then you can be sure of finding it in good condition when you want to use it again. 
It does not require a very thick coating, because MARLIN RUST REPELLER will 
stand a much greater degree of heat or cold than other so-called rust preventatives. 
It will stay where you put it and never gum, drip, or grow rancid. 




THE BEST AND CLEANEST METAL PRESERVER, 
SUPERIOR AS A LUBRICANT. 

FOR GUNS-REVOCVERS-RfflES 
1ALLMEIALS 



J RUST 
REPELLER 

SUC CE S SOR TO 





for Bicycle Chains easy TO apply 



and bearings a most excellent lubricant 
as well as a rust preventative. 



used by 

Machine Manufacturers 
and Dealers 

USED BY 

Skate Manufacturers 
and Dealers 

TJSED BY 

Cutlery Manufacturers 
and Dealers 

TJSED BY 

Fine Tool Manufacturers 
and Dealers 



EASY TO REMOVE 



<♦ 




Eor sale by the sporting-goods 
trade everywhere, or mailed 
to any address on receipt of 
price. 

\\ oz. tubes, 15 cents 
3 oz. tubes, 25 cents 
1 lb. cans, 75 cents 



Address THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS CO. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

On receipt of 15 cents we will mail to any address a full Deck of our Special Playing Cards. 
Highest Quality and Special Sportsman's Backs. 









VI 



RECREA TION. 



ttj&m&i 


} $W$£SS^3 


&f§?¥i9fi 


■ ^™2&£t£ 


I^^'" 1 ^^^^ 


fgi' %• ajt^tsi 






<j5 l v'<BW|gC3--*»!j 


S^^Si^^SS 






^■■jiiiSj ^ G^% iL-^*iffi "^fc 



im 



Y*^ 1898 PRIZE 1* 

WALL PAPER 



" Best in style and quality. Lowest in price."— N. Y. World, Nov. 10, 1897, 

SAMPLES MAILED FREE 

upon request. Our papers are all high-class and cheaper by half than your 
local dealer's prices. New Floral, Silk, Chintz, Delft, Denim stripe effects, 
etc., for parlors and bedrooms, 3c. to 10c. per roll. Beautiful and high class 
Tapestry, Damask, Colonial, Louis XIV., Empire, Byzantine, Moorish. Rococo, 
Embossed Leather, Marie Antoinette stripes, rich Floral and Satin effects, etc., 
etc., for parlors, dining-rooms and halls, at 10c, l%y 2 c, 15c, 18c, and up to 
25c. a roll. Write for samples, for these superior papers can only be bought 
from us or our agents. One price everywhere, and 

WE PAY THE FREIGHT 

All AP'PTlt WiJllfPfl "me very town to sell on commission from our large 
x *-* x "Swill TT auiWU sample- books, showing hundreds of beautiful pat- 
terns. We furnish advertising cards and circulars with agent's name on free, and 
refer customers to them, who write us for samples. The business pays well from 
the start, for no local dealer can carry one-tenth the variety of designs and color- 
ings, or sell as cheap- A pleasant and profitable business requiring no capital or 
experience. Over 8000 agents are now selling our papers every year. 

For samples, or particulars about the agency, write to nearest address* 



Qfi-CfcVfiS 



&n 



NEWY0RK 

41 -.45 
W. 14 s ST. 



Alfred Peats & <s 



CHICAGO 

145-145 

WABASH m 



Savoy 



*\\ 



"Silver 
M Plate that Wears! 

Made in artistic and original 

patterns only. Your silverware 

will be correct in every way if it is 

"1847 Rog %%,» 

Made only by 

The Meriden Britannia Co., 

Meriden, Conn. 

208 Fifth Ave., New York. 

Sold by leading dealers 
everywhere. 



ymm 



j^c*£ 



<4- 



Vesta 



RECREATION. 



VII 



KEEP YOUR GUNS. 



fi 



Clean 
Dry 




RECREATION GUN CABINET. 



IN FULL VIEW 

and OF YOURSELF 

AND FRIENDS 

IN A 

Recreation 

■ i h i i i ih w ii i 'i ii p I'nw m i 

Gun Cabinet 

JMade of Oak or Cherry 

Height, 5 ft. JO inches. 

Width, 2 ft. 6 inches. 

Depth, \2 inches* 

Good lock on door. 

Brass rail on top of case. 

Padded rack for 4 guns. 

Unsightly duffle in side spaces is 
hidden from view when door 
is closed. 

Unobstructed view of guns, ob- 
tained by use of one door. 

Plenty of room for shells, tools, and 
other Sportsmen's equipments. 



Made by G, S. HUDSON & SON 

ELLISBURG, N. Y. 



& 



This Cabinet Given as a Premium for 25 New Sub* 
scriptions to RECREATION 



Vlll 



RECREA TION. 





CpMS^ 



AND WITH IT OUR MANllALOFlil 



FYERYTtIING 







LARGER AND MORE INTERESTING 
THAN EVER. 

THAT our Manual for 1898 is larger than ever we know. 
That it will be found more interesting than usual we 
believe, because of the many new and novel features 
with which it may fairly be said to bristle. It is not a mere 
catalogue, but a book of 200 pages, size 9x11 inches, it con- 
tains over 500 engravings, mostly new, these are supplemented 
by six full-sized colored plates of the choicest novelties of the 
season, all bound in a cover that is both pleasing and original. 
It costs us 30 cents each to place a copy in your hands, but 
to give it the widest possible distribution, we will send this 
magnificent manual 

FREE 

To all who will send 10 cents (in stamps) to cover postage. 
To customers who bought of us direct in either '06 or '97 
it will be sent free without application, before January 15th. 
We will also send the Manual, without charge, to those 
who have bought our Seeds during the past two seasons, pro= 
vided they apply by letter, and give the name of the local 
dealer from whom they purchased. To all others, as first 
stated, on receipt of 10 cents (in stamps) to cover postage. 

WE NO LONGED SUPPLY OUR SEEDS TO DEALERS 

and thus having no longer to protect a wholesale trade, our 
new business slogan, 

"FROM OUR GROUNDS TO YOURS" 

has a special significance, as it enables us not only to sell the 

• BEST SEEDS IN THE WORLD * 

at lower prices than ever, but also in most cases deliver them 
Free to any part of the United States. Finally, we would like 
our friends to remember that from now on Peter Henderson 
& Co.'s Seeds can only be obtained by ordering direct from 
their Manual, or by direct purchase at their stores in New 
York. Send for the Manual in any of the ways suggested 
and see for yourself whether we have exaggerated in die 
slightest detail, finally 

OUR "SOUVENIR" SEED COLLECTION 

will also be sent without charge to all applicants sending 10 
cents for the Catalogue who will state where they saw this 
advertisement. 

Postal Card Applications will Receive No Attention. 




Stylish, Fine Fitting, Convenient, and Economical 

LINENE' Collars 
4 and 

Stand=Up or Turn=Down Collars wUILS... 

Made from fine cloth, exactly alike on both sides. 
The most comfortable and economical of anything 
made. 

NO LAUNDRY BILLS 

When soiled discard. The turn-down styles are re- 
versible and give double service. A box of ten collars 
or five pairs of cuffs, 25 cents. 

SEND 6 CENTS in stamps for a sample collar and 
pair of cuffs. (Mention style collar.) 

Reversible Collar Co., Dept. L - - Boston 




)SiDE Light, 

I ONANISM 




^ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR FREE 



Peter Henderson ^CoJP^n^s^ Co 

35x37CoRTlandt' 



RECREATION. ix 



Fortify the System" 

Nearly twenty=five years ago we used these words. At 
that time we knew Scott's Emulsion cured consumption in 
its early stages. We knew it brought relief to all cases, 
and prolonged the lives of those far advanced with the 
disease. But we did not understand the reason why. 

Now we know it is in that word, " Fortify." 

You take Scott's Emulsion and you fortify the 
system against the attacks of the germs of consump- 
tion. With this reinforcement, the body wins in the 
struggle, and you are cured. 

Scott's Emulsion cures weak throats and lungs be= 
cause the cod liver oil supplies just the fat necessary 
for the body to enable it to successfully resist the dis= 
ease. Without this fat, the body rapidly loses in weight 
and power, and the germs of disease stand a fair 
chance of winning. 

Scott's Emulsion also contains the Hypophosphites. 
These keep up the nerve power. They strengthen the 
digestion, give vigor to the nerves, and tone up all the 
activities of a healthy organism. 

Scott's Emulsion also contains Glycerine, a remedy 
of great value when there is any irritation or inflamma= 
tion of the throat or lungs. 

Best of all, Scott's Emulsion prevents. Take it if 
you are weak and thin, with a tendency to cough and 
take cold easily. 50c and $1.00. 

SCOTT & BOWNE, CHEMISTS, NEW YORK. 



RECREA TION. 



N. Y. 3316.— Ed. 6-25.000. 



Memorandum of Weight. 



DATE OF MAILING. 




New York Post Office, 

..J^~./~., 189 



Received from 




IN WEIGHT, AS FOLLOWS 





I.. No. 1 Sack, 3 lbs. 



No. 2 Sack, 2 lbs. 5 o: 



.jrfe 



TARE. GROSS WEIGHT. 



fo 



Xosso 



bs$ 



Net Weight, - • ■ 

Rate per pound t 
Amount of postage, 





Postmaster. 



Receiving Clerk. 



Here is my Post=office receipt for December REC= 
REATION. It took 181 sacks to carry this issue. A copy 
of RECREATION weighs about 5 oz. Do a little figur= 
ing and you will find out about how many copies it 
will take to make a postage bill of $199. 



RECREA TION. 



XI 



(38) 



ORDER from the PERIODICAL DEPT. of 
The Amert&ajn News Company, 

To M 




f. 189 Z) 



New York.. 

answer by return on' all goods you cannot furnish 



AT ONCE 

SEND GOODS TO THE 



NEWS COMPANY 



FOR ENCLOSURE. BILLS AND ANSWER TO US. 





/ i ^ 



G O 



Here is still another order from the American News 
Co. Refer to same page in December RECREATION, 
and you will see this order calls for 400 more than 
the other. 




What's 
the Use 

of walking when you 
can get a f irst-class, high- 
grade bicycle for nothing? 

How? 

By getting 75 subscriptions for 

Recreation 

If you live in a town of 3.000 
or more, and if you are a hustler 
you can get these in 2 days. 

I can give you the names of 20 
people who did this in 1896, and 
who now have their wheels. 

Write for particulars. 

RECREATION 

19 West 24th Street 
New York 




Xll 



RECREA T10X. 




COSTS NOTHING 

But the asking to get our 
new 1898 Catalogue of 
either 

PIANOS or ORGANS 

A larger number of styles 
to select from than any- 
other company in the World. 

THE SECRET OF WEALTH IS TO BUY RIGHT. 

The nearer the manufacturer and consumer can be 
brought together, the more money saved to the consumer. 
~\Ye can sell you an 

ORGAN °* PIANO 

at wholesale prices, thus saving you every penny usually 
pocketed by agents and dealers. 

SEND TO-DAY FOR OUR NFW 

DUE BILL n5ooo e oY°H ORGAN 
CERTIFICATE l»«a) PIANO 

CASH OR INSTALLMENT. 

30 days' trial. No money in advance. Safe de- 
livery at your depot insured. Our new due bill certi- 
ficate shows you how to get an Organ or Piano for 
little or nothing. Remember our Catalogue costs 
you nothing, and will positively save you 
money. 

PIANOS, $155 UP. 





* ! ^ l!H . 1 *., Bl!i: ., i .--is-.--: , .i^;. jr;jii:;;![:|^! | r= j, ,; • 



ORGANS, $25 UP 

We furnish with each Piano 
a $10.00 hard wood Piano Chair 
free, also Plush Scarfs and 
$10.00 worth of the latest sheet 
music. Complete Organ outfit 
free. Our factory, with its enor- 
mous capacity, enables us to sell 
you a high-grade instrument at 
a figure much below that of any 
other company in the World. 
Incorporated for 50 Years. 

WE LEAD, OTHERS FOLLOW. 

BEETHOVEN 

Piano and Organ Co., 

Washington, N. J. 

P. O. BOX 1 090 



RECREA TION. 



Xlll 




M ennen's 



Take no substitutes which are likely to 
do harm. 

For sale everywhere, or mailed on 
receipt of 25 cents. (Free sample.) 

GERHARD MENNEN 
CHEMICAL COMPANY 

NEWARK, N. J. 



XIV 



RECREA TION. 




DRAWING OF THE MONARCH EJECTOR 



Greener Guns 
Are Good Guns 



So 



This is a universal opinion. Ten men out of ten will acknowledge it. 
patent a fact must appeal to the common sense of shooters everywhere. 

Like Steinway pianos or Dunlap hats, every one admits they are good, 
whether they use them or not. Greener guns have done more to demonstrate 
their superiority than any other gun in the world. We could fill a book with 
their actions, and actions speak louder than words. 

Even the lower grades of Greener guns give splendid results. Take the 
$125-00 grade "Facile Princeps " for instance. Thousands of them are in use 
and never has the demand been so great as at present. 

If you are in the market for a good gun and do not care to run any risks, 
buy a Greener, for all Greener guns shoot well and look well, and wear well. 

THE NEW MONARCH EJECTOR 

LATEST MODEL GREENER. PRICE, $175.00 

The ejector mechanism in the Monarch is the simplest in existence, and the 
action is the strongest. 

It is better to pay for a good name like the Greener than to pay for repairs. 

We are the Sole Agents in the United States for Greener Guns, and keep in 
stock all grades from $100.00 to $650.00. 

We have prepared a special catalogue of Greener Guns that will be sent for 
the asking. 



HENRY C. SQUIRES & SON 



20 CORTLANDT STREET 



NEW YORK 



RECRRA TION. 



xv 



he Washington 
Monument is the 
tallest shaft of mason- 
ry in the world. It is 
55 feet square at the 
base, and rises to a 
height of 557 feet. 
One year's product of 
the Pabst Brewing 
Company in quarter 
barrels, would make a 
pyramid 55 ft. square 
at the base and one 
mile higher than this 
monument. Can you 
imagine the quantity 
of hoop iron and 
staves in such a pyra- 
mid, to say nothing 
of the railroad facili- 
ties necessary to move 
a year's product of 
this great brewery ? 



Malt is sprouted bar- 
ley; by sprouting, the 
constituents of the 
grain are changed into 
easily digestible mat- 
ter. Hops added to 
this food give the pro- 
perties of sleep and 
nerve tonic. The su- 
periority of 

Pabst Malt Extract, 

The "Best" Tonic, 

over all other malt ex- 
tracts is in its careful 
andscientificprepara- 
tion and the unsur- 
passed facilities pos- 
sessed by its manufac- 
turers. This prepara- 
tion contains every 
element of life, nutri- 
tion andhealth, with- 
out an imperfection. 






PABST PEBFECTED BBEWING IN AMEBICA 



R EC RE A riON. 



If you use 

WILLIAMS' 

SHAVING SOAP 

you can always count on 



SB 



5£29 



If you use other 
kinds, you are 
pretty sure to 
experience - 



ftm 






fe: a 



'■■■■- 
SHUC81S 







JUL 






f HM 






WILLIAMS \ 

universally acknowledged to be 

The only real= 



= Shaving Soaps. 



WILLIAMS' SOAPS— in principal forms — sold by Dealers everywhere. w .. , . . 

Williams' Shaving Stick (Barbers'j 

25 cents. 



A 




Luxury Shaving Tablet 
25 cents. 

Round— just fits the 

cup. Delicate 

perfume. 




"Oenuine Yankee'* Soap 
10 cents. 



Oldest and most famous 

cake of shaving soap 

in the world. 





NOTK— If your dealer fails to supply 
yon-we mail these soaps to any 
address— postpaid — on receipt of price. 



Thia Is the kind your barber 
si ii ■!! iii use. 

Exquisite also for Toilet anil 
Bath. Used in thousauds 
of the best families. 

Bure cure for "chappedbands." 

d cakes In n package — 10 eta. 

Trial sample for 2 cent stamp. 

Address The J. B. Williams Co. aiastonbury.Ct. U.S.A. 

London: «.* great russell st.. w. a sydnev: iei clarence bt. 



.• ss± t wfiosrarr a > 




AFTER THE REPORT THE EEK MADE A FEW JUMPS AND FELL DEAD." 



Volume VIE. 



RECREATION. 

FEBRUARY, 1898. 

G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 2. 



IN THE OLYMPIC MOUNTAINS. 



C. C. MARING. 



The Olympic peninsula, covering 
the Northwestern division of the 
State of Washington, embraces an 
area of which less is positively 
known than of any other section 
of equal magnitude in the United 
States. This vast territory is nearly 
covered by the Olympic mountains, 




PHOTO BY C. C. MARING. 

EIGHT POUND TROUT, LAKE CUSHMAN, 
WASH. 

It contains over 4,000 square miles, 
and is so wild and rough that few 
persons have ventured into its in- 
terior. 

During the summer of 1895 I had 
the pleasure of climbing Copper 
mountain, one of the prominent 
peaks of the Olympics, near Lake 
Cushman, and as I stood near the 
summit, over 7,000 feet above the 



lake, I was so impressed with the 
view that I decided, should I have 
the opportunity, to go farther into 
this little-known territory. 

The following spring I received 
an invitation, from my friend Rus- 
sell Homan, to join a hunting and 
exploring party that was going in- 
to the Olympics. 

I accepted the invitation, and one 
bright morning in July took pas- 
sage from Seattle to Hoodsport, on 
the little steamer Delta. We trav- 
eled about 60 miles on Puget 
sound, then about 40 miles on 
Hood's canal, an arm of the sound, 
having the general appearance of a 
river. This canal borders the East- 
ern side of the Olympic peninsula, 
and the view of the mountains from 
it is one of continuous grandeur. I 
spent the night at Hoodsport, and 
early the next morning started for 
an 8-mile stage-ride to Lake Cush- 
man. 

The road passed through such 
impenetrable forests that we won- 
dered how a trail, not to mention a 
road, had ever been built through 
them. Many of the trees were over 
200 feet high, and they grew so near 
together that the sunlight was ex- 
cluded. It seemed more like twi- 
light than a bright sunny morning. 
The occasional fording of mountain 
streams, the passing of picturesque 
lakes, and the tales of adventures 
along this road, told by our driver, 
added to the pleasure of the ride. 



8 7 




The road does not extend quite to 
Lake Cushman, so we were trans- 
ferred bag and baggage to a boat 
and rowed about half a mile up the 
Skokomish river, to the lower end 
of the lake. Here we paused and 
gazed enraptured at the scene. 

Before us lay the lake, and, re- 
flected in its mirror-like surface the 
grand view beyond. Mt. Ellinor 




MT. ELLINOR FROM LAKE CUSHMAN. 

and Mt. Rose rising, with their 
sharp, snow-covered peaks, from 
the very water's edge, made a fit- 
ting background for the beautiful 
scene. To the left was the hotel, 
amid its grove of cotton-wood, and 
still farther to the left the pictu- 
resque cottages of Russell Homan, 
with their artistic grounds, brilliant 
with flowers. A row of three-quar- 
ters of a mile brought us to this de- 
lightful place, and for several days, 
while making preparations for the 



and as our party of 5 men, Russell 
Homan, Stanley Hopper, myself 
and 2 helpers, 5 pack-horses, and 
a dog", slowly wended our way up 
the trail, the scene must have been 
one of unusual interest. 

Would that 1 could bring- before 
you every vista that greeted us as 
we journeyed. The trail, for the 
first 4 miles, was a good one, at 
times running near the beautiful 
Skokomish river. We were tempt- 
ed to loiter, either to cast for trout 
in the pools, or to gaze a little lon- 
ger at some wild, dash- 
ing part of the stream ; 
but we moved stead- 




nor, we 
enjoyed ourselves 
variously. 

The fishing was 
good in the river and 
in the lake and sev- 
eral good catches 
were made. The ac- 
companying photo 
shows Mr. Homan 
with an 8-pound 
trout, which was 
landed after a hard 
fight. 

On the morning of 
July 27 all of the 
guests at the hotel, 
and all of the set- 
tlers around the lake, 
were assembled to 
see our departure, 



9° 



RECREA TION. 



ily on. From the turns of the 
river, our way lay through just 
such forests as we had driven 
through before. 

At several places on the first 4 
or 5 miles of the trail settlers had 



pasturage was good, Ave decided to 
make our first camp at that place. 

The last few miles had been te- 
dious, especially as an occasional 
fallen tree had to be chopped to 
make a passage for the horses, and 
as one inexperienced horse, Dandy, 
caused considerable delay, losing 
her footing several times, and at 
one place nearly rolling into the 
river. Each of these mishaps ne- 
cessitated repacking. 

A few days later, at " Camp Look- 
about," this unfortunate Dandy, 
while grazing, made a misstep and 




CAMP LOOKABOUT MT. DUCKABUSH 

AND MT. STEEL. AND GLACIER. 

made log-cabins to serve as tem- 
porary abiding places, while they 
were "taking up" timber claims. 

After the last inhabited cabin was 
passed, we beheld the Gorge. 
Here the Skokomish is very wild, 
clashing a mass of foam over and 
around a succession of bowlders, 
and then, as if to rest, passing 
quietly on between walls of rock. 

The last cabin, known as Find- 
ley's, is 7 miles from the lake. This 
was the last indication of civiliza- 
tion we saw until our return. 

We knew nothing of the condi- 
tion of the trail beyond and, as the 



CREVASSE IN DUCKABUSH GLACIER. 



rolled a long distance down a steep 
mountain-side. She was so badly 
bruised and cut by the loose rocks 
over which she had rolled that she 
was unable to stand. All of our 
efforts to make her comfortable 
seemed of no avail, and, to the re- 




SUMMER HOME OF RUSSELL HOMAN, 



gret of our entire party, it was nec- 
essary to have her shot. We were 
fortunate in having a very saga- 
cious horse for the leade'r of our 
pack-train. The skill and tact she 
displayed in climbing over huge 
logs, carefully feeling her way 
down very steep places, through 
rapidly running streams, and 
through sink-holes, and at all times 
making allowance for the size of the 
pack she was carrying, showed her 
to be endowed with a great deal 
more than ordinary horse sense. 

Early the following morning we 
left Findley's and tramped, up hill 
and down dale, 7 more miles to 
" Camp 7," one of the picturesque 
stopping-places of the O'Neill ex- 
ploring party. 

We had occasional glimpses of 
the Skokomish, hundreds of feet be- 
low but always easily located by its 
roar. It passed through narrow 
gorges, with precipitous sides, from 
100 to over 200 feet in height. One 
can form some idea of how rapidly 
the water must run, as in those 7 
miles the fall is over 600 feet. 

During the day 2 mountain tor- 
rents, tributaries of the Skokomish, 
were crossed. At the first some 
trouble was experienced in getting 
the horses to ford the rapidly run- 
ning stream, but the real difficulty 
was in getting ourselves across. 



This was accomplished at a spe- 
cially wild place farther down the 
stream. Here a tree felled over the 
ravine served as a means of cross- 
ing. The sensation as one stands 
on this narrow bridge and gazes into 
the stream, 100 feet below, is not al- 
together one of pleasure. We all 
crossed in safety, but some of the 
more timorous resorted to other 
means than walking. 

The next stream, known as 
"Camp 6" stream, was similarly 
crossed. Just below where the ford- 
ing was made, is a series of falls 
measuring over 200 feet. In cross- 
ing this stream, on a former trip, 
Mr. Hopper lost a valued pack- 
horse. The water was high, the 
poor animal was unable to keep its 
footing and was carried over the 
falls. 

As we proceeded from "Camp 
7 " toward the interior our trail 
grew less distinct. We passed 
through heavy timber, then for a 
long distance through what is well 
named " the jungle." This is a piece 
of low land covered with a heavy 
growth of all that is disagreeable. 
Nettles, devil's walking-sticks and 
salmon-berry bushes predominate. 
The latter were covered with fruit, 
and judging from indications this 
jungle must have been a popular 
feeding place for bear. 



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RECREA TION. 



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A MOUNTAIN WATERFALL. 



Through occasional open places we were 
afforded beautiful views. An especially inter- 
esting one was of a mountain stream which 
started near the summit of the range and fell 
by a succession of fails almost to our feet. 
We estimated the entire visible fall to be about 
2000 feet. 

Indications of game were plentiful, and elk, 
deer, bear, and wolf tracks were frequently 
seen. At one place, the freshly made track of 
an immense cougar arrested our attention. 
Farther up, in the damp places, we found the 
home of the sewellel, or mountain beaver. 
These little animals are found only in the Pa- 
cific Northwest. They live in settlements, and 
their peculiar runways and excavations some- 
times cover several acres. 

At one point the trail had been washed 
away, and we were obliged to make a new 
one. This delayed us, but before night we 
had made the ascent to the first divide, and at 
8 P.M. found ourselves, weary and jaded, nearly 
5,ooo feet higher than Lake Cushman. This 
divide is the watershed between the Skoko- 
mish and Duckabush rivers. 

From the magnificent view in every direc- 
tion we decided that " Camp Lookabout " 
was a suitable name for our new resting place. 
Nearby were green meadows, where our 
horses were contented to remain, and seeming- 
ly everywhere were the most beautiful flow- 
ers. The various snow patches about our 
camp were surrounded by flowers, and, in 
places, we saw buds, about to bloom, pushing 
their way through the snow. Back of us and 
to the North was the mountain on which we 
were camped. To the East was a short, rug- 
ged mountain-range in which could be seen a 
glacier of considerable size. To the South the 
view of Mt. Skokomish, its glacier, and the 
valley through which we had passed, was es- 
pecially grand. The glacier, though a small 
one, is very beautiful. It is broken by several 
huge crevasses, and the peculiar greenish-blue 
color of the ice showed distinctly from be- 
neath its covering of snow. 

To the West we had a view of Mt. Steele, one 
of the highest peaks in this part of the Olym- 
pics. It is over 8,ooo feet high. Away to 
the South of this is a succession of tower- 
ing unnamed peaks. To the North of Mt. 
Steele is another rugged range. So terri- 
bly grand and wild is the scenery in the 



IN THE OLYMPIC MOUNTAINS. 



93 



Olympics, that I was filled with 
awe at every turn of the way. 

We remained at "Camp Look- 
about " over a week, and took short 
exploring- trips in every direction. 
On one of these trips I saw my first 



whistling marmot. 



This little ani- 




A NARROW BRIDGE. 



mal, though some larger, reminded 
me very much of the ground-hog of 
the East. There are thousands of 
them in this region, and their sharp, 
shrill whistle is quite musical. 

Mr. Hopper, the hunter of our 
party, kept our table supplied with 
grouse, and they served as an agree- 



able change from bacon, ham, and 
corn-beef. While on our short trips 
from Camp Lookabout we saw no 
big game, but indications of their 
presence were plentiful. 

The last few days spent at the first 
divide were rendered disagreeable 
by a drizzling rain. This served 
to dampen our spirits, and we de- 
cided to break camp and proceed 
to the main divide, the watershed 
between Puget sound and the Pa- 
cific ocean. 

The loss of one pack-horse and 
the disabling of another, made it 
necessary for each member of the 
party to shoulder a pack of over 50 
pounds. 

Under the most favorable cir- 
cumstances the 2 days' journey to 
Lake Marmot, on the main divide, 
is an arduous one, but to plod on, 
through the rain, loaded as we 
were, made us realize that there 
might be more agreeable pastimes 
than exploring the wilds of Wash- 
ington. 

As we traveled over park-like 
meadows, down small streams, 
across snow fields, and then made 
the actual descent, down a steep zig- 
zag trail, into the Duckabush val- 
ley, we saw much to make us ex- 
claim, despite our difficulties, "How 
grand!" To the right as we de- 
scended, stood, in bold relief, a tow- 
ering perpendicular cliff. To the 
left were many beautiful waterfalls. 
In one stream 4 picturesque falls 
could be seen. Before us lay the 
Duckabush valley. 

We had crossed and recrossed 
streams, tramped up and down, 
climbed over and under logs, 
crossed gulches, and walked cau- 
tiously over snowbridges, beneath 
which the stream had worn great 
tunnels. 

We were very weary, but our fa- 
tigue did not prevent our enjoyment 
of the view, when for the first time 
we beheld the basin in which is lo- 
cated Lake Marmot. This little 



94 



RECREA TIOiV. 



grove near the shore 
of the lake. From this 
camp, which we after- 
ward named Elk camp, 
we took short trips of 
exploration. 

On one trip we made 
the Quiniault valley, our 
objective point. To reach 
this we passed out of 
Lake Marmot basin from 
the South and ascended 




ELK CAMP. 



' 



LAKE MARMOT 



WHISTLING MARMOTS. 



lake, with its small island in the about 1,000 feet. At that elevation 

centre, its green-sloping shore, its we had an unobstructed view of 

2 tributaries, and its picturesque the lofty peaks by which we were 

surroundings, is a sight of rare surrounded. Mt. Duckabush, to 

beauty. the South, is the one that attract- 

We pitched our tent in a small cd the most attention, lor on it is 



IN THE OLYMPIC MOUNTAINS. 



95 



the Largest glacier in this part of 
tin- Olympics. 

The glacier, which is broken by 
many crevasses, is accessible, and a 
near view is well worth the exertion 
to obtain it. 

We continued our ascent and 
were soon rewarded by a view of 
the Quiniault valley and lake, and 
far away the expanse of the broad 
Pacific. 

The descent into the valley was 
very precipitous. We enjoyed the 
slide down a long snow field, but, 
going down a creek bottom, at an 
angle of 45 degrees, was less agree- 




AT THE FOOT OF THE GLACIER. 

able. The slippery rocks and slid- 
ing earth made our progress slow 
and hazardous. 

It was while descending this wild 
place that we saw our first elk. Far 
below, in a small opening, one could 
be seen feeding. A nearer view 
showed us 3 magnificent bulls, 
and we immediately determined 
that one of them should be ours. 
This was my first experience in 
stalking big game, and those who 
have been similarly situated will 
understand the intensity of my ex- 
citement as we skulked behind 
bowlders, bushes, and timbers. 

The elk, evidently tired of their 



grazing place, moved slowly toward 
the timber, and disappeared on one 
of their well-worn trails. This was 
our opportunity and, with Mr. Hop- 
per in the lead, we hastened across 
the opening and followed the trail 
a few rods, when, on ascending a 
small hill, we saw one of the elk 
standing, with full left side exposed 
to view, not over 100 feet away. 

Mr. Hopper quickly aimed, but 
the cartridge failed to explode. The 
click of the rifle startled the elk, and 
by the time the second aim was 
taken it had passed behind some 
timber. A small portion of his body 
could be seen. That was sufficient, 
and after the report the elk made a 
few jumps and fell dead. We rushed 
to the same level and could easily 
have shot one of the others, but, 
in one elk, weighing about 800 
pounds, Ave realized that we had a 
great deal more meat than we could 
use. 

To our surprise the 2 remaining 
elk seemed to be more curious than 
startled. They moved a short dis- 
tance, stopped, looked at their fallen 
companion, and then passed on into 
the timber. We encountered nu- 
merous difficulties in getting the 
meat to camp. These were all sur- 
mounted, and we feasted .on elk 
steak as long as we remained in the 
mountains. A snow drift near-camp 
made a perfect refrigerator. 

A few days later we decided to 
explore a portion of the Olympics 
never before visited, and if possible 
to locate a trail to the South fork of 
the Skokomish by which we might 
later return to civilization. We 
spent 3 days on this trip, but found 
we could not, in the time we had, 
make a feasible trail to the South 
fork, so abandoned that plan. 

There is a network of elk trails 
through the accessible parts of the 
range, and these greatly facilitated 
our traveling. On one occasion we 
followed the same trail, for a long 
distance, up steep grades and over 




MY FIRST NEAR VIEW OF A BUNCH OF ELK. 



snow fields, until we reached the 
end, and found that it was impos- 
sible to proceed on account of the 
roughness of the country. 

We did not regret having gone so 
far out of our way for, from this high 
elevation we had a fine view of the 
surrounding country, and, in a 
snow-covered basin, away below 
us, we could see a large band of 
elk. 

This side of the valley is one rock 
ridge after another, and the only 
way to reach the elk, and the open- 
ing above them — where we had 
originally intended to go — was to 
descend to the bottom of the valley, 
over 1,000 feet below. The country 
was so rough that it took us 3 hours 
to go from the place where we first 
saw the elk, to the basin just below 
them. We disposed of our packs, 
rested a few minutes, then started 
in the direction of the elk, for the 
purpose of getting a photograph of 



the band. After going a short dis- 
tance we found the elk had moved 
from the snow to a meadow just to 
the left. We made our way toward 
the meadow; by the time we had 
reached the ridge nearest the elk, 
they had all returned to the snow- 
covered basin. 

We quickly passed over this 
ridge, and, from behind bushes and 
timber, I had my first near view of 
a band of elk. There were 32 in the 
band, 4 very large bulls, 3 smaller 
ones, and 25 cows and calves. To 
get my first snap-shot, I moved 
slowly from behind the bushes and 
stood in full view, still unobserved 
by the elk. The distance was a little 
too great for a satisfactory view, and 
Mr. Hopper, who had joined me, ad- 
vised me to rush toward the band 
and to make an exposure at the 
proper distance. This I did, and I 
was more surprised than the elk. 
Instead of the stampede 1 had antici- 



96 



IN THE OLYMPIC MOUNTAINS. 



97 



pated, the elk slowly arose. Some The elk all passed up the left side 

trotted away, others walked, and 2 of the basin, and after reaching the 

of the largest bulls stood for a few perpendicular cliffs near the upper 

moments, seemingly meditating part stopped for several minutes 

whether to move on, or show fight, and viewed us with evident curios- 





PHOTOS BY C. C. MAKING. 

BAND OF 3 2 ELK. 



I certainly felt, for a few seconds, 
that I had been rash in approaching 
in that manner a whole band of elk. 
At one time I wondered how far I 
would have to run to reach timber. 




MOUNTAIN FLOWERS. 



SNOW BRIDGE, OLYMPIC MOUNTAINS. 

ity. They then passed over the 
mountain and out of sight. In all 
probability this was their first sight 
of man. 

We returned to camp feeling that 
in the near view of such a large band 
of elk, we had been well repaid for 
the many hardships through which 
we had passed to reach them. 

We made the return trip without 
mishap, and the reviews we had of 
the scenes served to fix them in our 
memories. 

The Olympics are certainlv a 
paradise for the artist, the hunter, 
the naturalist, and the explorer. 
They have only to become more 
generally known to be visited and 
appreciated. 

This region is so full of nature's 
beauties that it well might rival the 
Yellowstone region as a national 
park. 



HUNTING WITH A CAMERA. 
III. 

THE LITTLE CHIEF HARE. 



W. E. CARLIN. 



To my mind this is the most interesting 
of all the smaller animals we have photo- 
graphed. Our experience with him is con- 
fined to the Bitter Root mountain, where 
he makes his home in the slide-rock, at 
various altitudes. We found him at ele- 
vations of 3,500 to 8,500 feet. 

The pika is a miniature hare, but there 
is something quite ratlike in his general 
appearance, especially in his eyes. Here 



slide rock home and reappearing at short 
intervals during the day, until the sun gets 
low. Then they eat supper and sun them- 
selves as before. 

As fall approaches they are very busy, 
all day long, laying up their winter's sup- 
ply of hay. 

Frequently one of the little fellows will 
pop out and, looking quickly about to see 
if the coast is clear, will hurry off to gather 




LITTLE CHIEF HARE, OR ROCKY MOUNTAIN PIKA. 



are dimensions of a full grown male speci- 
men we measured: 

Total length 6^2 inches. 

Length of body 5 inches. 

Length of tail 0.4 inch. 

Height, at shoulder 2^4 inches. 

Girth, back of shoulder . . . .4^ inches. 

They are, as a rule, jerky and erratic in 
their movements, and dodge in and out 
among the rocks with incredible swiftness. 
Their cry is unique, resembling the sharp 
note of a child's toy trumpet. The pika 
feeds on grass, weeds and berries, being 
especially fond of the leaves and fruit of the 
wild raspberry bush. 

After their morning, meal they lie and 
sun themselves on some rock, retiring as 
the sun gets high into the shade of their 



some favorite grass. Then he will come 
scampering back with a bunch nearly as 
big as himself. 

When disturbed or surprised he nearly 
always gives vent to his sharp cry, open- 
ing his mouth wide as he utters it. His 
worst enemy is the weasel, but he is also 
the prey of hawks and martens. 

During winter, in the higher altitudes, 
the little chief must live for some time un- 
der the snows. In April, last, we went into 
the mountains, on snowshoes, for a month, 
and found their abodes covered with 6 to 10 
feet of snow. In the mouths of the can- 
yons, near the Bitter Root river, where 
the snow little more than covered the slide 
rock, I saw chief hares sitting on the snow, 
at different times during the winter, but 
higher up there was not a sign of one. 

Early in the season they are easier to 



99 



TOO 



RECREA TION. 



approach and photograph than later, when 
they are constantly on the move. 

We found pika the most difficult of all 



On one occasion I had gotten within 12 
feet of a hare and, as he appeared thor- 
oughly oblivious of my presence, I stopped 




SUNNING HIMSELF. 



the animals to photograph, and followed 
him nearly a month before we succeeded. 
It was difficult to get near one and to make 



down my Tele-photo lens, to a small open- 
ing, and started to expose for 4 seconds. 
I had finished counting 2 seconds when the 




JUST LOAFING. 



an exposure without disturbing it; for 
while he might appear sound asleep, a 
slight noise of any kind, and the little fel- 
low was up and off like a shot. 



hare disappeared like lightning; and on 
looking for the cause, I saw a weasel hunt- 
ing in the rocks, about 10 feet away. Call- 
ing to Wright we chased the weasel until 




THE WEASEL WHO SPOILED THE NEGATIVE. 



he went into a hole in the rocks. Here we 
set up our camera and got an exposure on 
him when he peeked out to see if we had 
gone. 

I will not recount all our efforts and 
failures, on the hares, but we finally had 




HIGH MINDED. 

to adopt the tiresome method of focussing 
on one of their favorite sunning places, and 
waiting patiently, 40 or 50 feet away, until 
a hare appeared. 

The exposures were made with a Bausch 
& Lomb-Zeiss lens, Series VIIa, working 



at full opening F. 6.3. The timing was 
i L d to -h second. The shutter was sprung 
with a 50 foot tube, to which was fitted an 
unusually large bulb. 



Dr. C. Hart Merriam, in his monograph 
of this interesting little creature, says: 

" The Rocky mountain Pika is common 
in the rock slides of the Boreal Province, 
in Idaho. In the Salmon river Pahsimeroi, 
in the Saw Tooth mountains, we found it 
ranging from the Canadian zone to within 
a short distance of the summits of the high- 
est peaks. It was encountered most 
abundantly in the neighborhood of timber 
line, between the altitudes of 3,050 and 
3,350 meters (10,000 and 11,000 feet), per- 
haps because suitable rock slides are most 
frequent at this elevation. The lowest col- 
ony discovered, in the Salmon river moun- 
tains, inhabited a mass of volcanic slide 
rock surrounded by Douglas fir and Mur- 
ray pine, on the East slope of the range, 
about 8,600 feet above the sea. In a narrow 
part of the valley of Big Wood river, near 
its headwaters, a few individuals were 
found in slides as low as 7,400 feet. It was 
observed also in the mountains between 
the headwaters of Big Lost river and Trail 
creek. 



102 



RECREA TION. 



" Pikas are noisy little creatures and are 
not likely to let any one pass near by with- 
out making their presence known. Their 
cry has been described as a 'bleat'; re- 
sembling that of a lamb, but the simile is 
strained. Their ordinary note is eh-eh, 
spasmodically ejaculated and several times 
repeated. Sometimes it is shriller and 
more like ee-ee, uttered many times in 
rapid succession. 

" They are active, nimble little bodies, 
springing lightly from rock to rock, and 
running swiftly to and from their feeding 
grounds, often several hundred feet away. 

" Their chief food-plant is a pretty little 
Arctic-alpine species (Genum rossii) which 
forms mats of green among the rocks and 
bears conspicuous yellow flowers. This is 
their ' hay,' and they lay up large quan- 
tities of it for winter use, depositing it in 
little heaps in the spaces between the rocks. 
These storehouses average about the size 
of a bushel measure and contain, in addi- 
tion to the leaves and flowers of Genum 
rossii, a few heads of purple Aster and 
golden Senecio. 

" The Pikas are very industrious. In 
early autumn they are constantly engaged 
in carrying hay to their storehouses, except 
when interrupted by intruders, at whom 
they stare and scold before plunging out of 
sight among the rocks. Soon after silence 
is restored they reappear, and their cry may 



be heard from a hundred points. They 
crawl out upon the rocks and sit motion- 
less for a while, and if undisturbed soon 
return to their task of laying up food for 
winter. I have watched them by the hour 
while thus engaged, running rapidly to the 
side of the slide, gathering a mouthful of 
leaves, and returning as swiftly to deposit 
it in the usual place. For such short- 
legged animals their speed is surprising, as 
well as the long leaps they make from rock 
to rock, never losing their footing. Their 
movements are not attended by any noise, 
which circumstance is due in part to the 
lightness of their bodies and in part to the 
dense pad of fur which covers the soles of 
their feet. 

" One afternoon, about the ist of Sep- 
tember, Mr. Vernon Bailey and I carried 
our blankets up to a Lagomys above tim- 
ber line, on the Salmon river mountains, 
and spent the night there. As darkness fell 
upon the mountains a storm set in. The 
wind blew a furious gale and rain began 
falling. Soon the rain changed to hail and 
sleet, and finally to snow. Much to our 
surprise we heard the unmistakable cry of 
the Pikas, at frequent intervals throughout 
the night. Whether they are usually noc- 
turnal, as well as diurnal, or whether the 
storm set them at work to move their 
storehouses to safer places, we have no 
means of knowing." 




AMATEUR I'HOTO BY KOIST. WALSTROM. 

ICE BOAT "IVERNE," ON LAKE PEPIN. 



A BEAR AND SOME SCARED HUNTERS. 



C. G. SIIEPARD. 



Late on the evening of August 1st, Mr. 
John Lenard was walking on the track, 
between Maple Ridge and Lathrop. He 
carried a dilapidated Winchester, that would 
not shoot twice in the same place, and with 
an action that usually balked at the first 
empty shell. 

A slight noise attracting his attention, he 
stopped, and to his amazement, saw the 
head of a bear, in the brush, beside the 



Suddenly the man carrying the lantern, 
fell, putting out the light. At the same in- 
stant another of the party, stepped on a 
hazel switch that sprung up and struck 
Lenard in the face. We could not see how 
high he jumped, but we heard him come 
down. Such a rattling of gun-barrels, 
clicking of locks, and chorus of yells, as 
followed, was never before heard in that 
neck of woods. 




PACKING HIM OUT. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. G. SHEPHERD. 



track. Lenard had never met a bear before, 
and he remembered the condition of his 
gun, yet, mustering up his courage, took 
careful aim at the animal's breast, and fired. 
The bear sprang forward, and Lenard suc- 
ceeded in pumping the old gun 3 times 
more, before a shell stuck. 

The bear turned, and took to the woods, 
and Lenard hastened on to his destination, 
told his story, and then returned, in com- 
pany with Jno. Stocklin, C. M. Shepherd 
and I. 

It was after dark when we reached the 
place, and we followed the trail by the light 
of a lantern, through swamp, brush and 
weeds. We could see but a few feet in any 
direction, and were in constant expectation 
of a charge by the wounded bear. 



I had no weapon with me but a revolver, 
drawing which, I rushed to where the noise 
was loudest, and my pistol coming in con- 
tact with Lenard's bosom, brought another 
yell from the prostrate hero. By this time, 
the lantern had been relighted, and no bear 
could be seen, though pale faces were 
plenty. 

Moving more cautiously, we pushed on 
through the thick brush, and came sud- 
denly on the bear, lying in a pool of blood. 
Some more high jumping took place, until 
we discovered that the animal was dead. 

It weighed about 200 pounds, and was 
possibly 2 years old, but no bear of its size 
ever caused more excitement. The mem- 
bers of our party are unanimous in the de- 
cision to trail our next bear by day-light. 



103 




BAITING UP. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY 



HUNTING INDIANS IN A FOG. 



LIEUT. C. B. HARDIN, U. S. A. 



During the Modoc war, in 1873, I was 
a member of Troop G, 1st Cavalry. With 
Troops B, F, and H, of the same regiment, 
5 companies of infantry, and a few Kla- 
math Indians, we were encamped at Land's 
ranche, 8 or 10 miles East of Captain Jack's 
stronghold. Gen. Wheaton, with more 
troops, was 4 miles West of the Modocs. 
At midnight of January 16th our little com- 
mand moved out on foot, and in single 
rile, over a rough trail. Until daylight we 
moved slowly on account of darkness, and 
then still more slowly because of a dense 



ceased firing. The fog made good shooting 
impossible, and we had but 3 men wounded. 
The Modocs suffered but slight loss. 

We picked up our wounded, and went 
into camp for the night. We were not a 
jolly party. The old hands knew that our 
work was yet before us, and the youngsters 
were nervous, having found that Indian 
fighting was by no means a lark. I thought 
myself fortunate in being assigned to picket 
duty with Private Lavelle — the jolliest fel- 
low in the troop. But Lavelle had made 
up his mind he was to die, on the mor- 




THE FIGHT WITH THE MODOCS IN THE 

LAVA BEDS. 
Headquarters on Tule Lake, from bluff north of camp. 

fog. We could not see 50 yards, and were 
in doubt as to our exact position. The 
greater part of the forenoon was spent in 
halts. It was a bad day to hunt Indians, 
but we had Gen. Wheaton's orders to move 
forward, and there was nothing else to be 
done. About noon we found a herd of 
Indian ponies and promptly gathered them 
in. The noise we made in so doing in- 
formed the Indians of our presence, and we 
fell back to avoid a premature engagement, 
followed by a few random shots from the 
redskins. We had retreated perhaps a mile, 
when a volley, accompanied with the usual 
yells, told that our retreat was cut off, and 
we must either fight or crawl. 

Troop B was ordered to charge and did 
so in gallant style; meeting with such a 
warm reception, however, that Troop G 
was sent to their assistance. The Indians 
were chased from point to point until they 



THE FIGHT WITH THE MODOCS IN THE 

LAVA BEDS. 

Headquarters and bluff ; from beyond picket line, looking 
N. W. 

row, and talked of nothing else; so I had 
a bad night of it. 

At daybreak we moved out to the attack, 
leaving a few men to care for the camp. 
One of these men, hearing of Lavelle's 
presentiment, begged to exchange posi- 
tions with him; but like the good soldier 
he was, Lavelle refused to shirk his duty. 

We started out as skirmishers, and kept 
that formation all day. The fog was, if 
possible, more dense than before, and the 
silence, unbroken save by the caution of 
our officers — " Steady, men, keep your in- 
tervals!" was positively awful. When we 
had advanced about half a mile, we found 
some ponies hobbled in front of a natural 
wall of rock. This wall was shaped like 
a horse-shoe, with the opening toward us. 

The ponies were a bait for a beautifully 
planned ambuscade, and the Indians were 
massed behind the wall, ready to gobble 



105 



io6 



RECREA TION. 



up any small detachment sent to take their 
horses. We were not looking for ponies 
that day, we were after their masters. 



had predicted his own death, was the only 
man killed outright. 

Troop B, on our right, poured volleys 




THE STAKE INDICATES THE SPOT WHERE 
GEN. CANBY AND THE PEACE COMMISSION- 
ERS WERE MURDERED, BY THE MODOCS. 

The whole line swept forward, and I ex- 
perienced no joy from the discovery that I 
was one of the few skirmishers who would 
have to enter the horse-shoe bend. The 
fog was at its worst as we entered the trap, 
and we advanced some distance into it. 



VIEW OF LAVA BEDS NEAR MASON'S CAMP, 
SHOWING A GROUP OF SOLDIERS AND 
WARM SPRING INDIANS. 

down our front, causing the enemy to fall 
back and cease firing for a brief period, 
and we drew off to better cover, taking our 
wounded with us. Here we awaited the 




BATTERY OF HOWITZERS IN POSITION IN 
CAPT. JACK'S STRONGHOLD. 

when we received a terrible volley. Our 
2d Lieutenant was shot through the shoul- 
der; he spun round like a top before fall- 
ing, letting his carbine fly from his hand. 
The carbine struck my head and made me 
think I was blown to atoms. Several 
others went down, but poor Lavelle, who 



VIEW OF LAVA BEDS LOOKING N.E.; SHOW- 
ING MODOC FORTIFICATIONS IN THE 
BACKGROUND. 

action of Gen. Wheaton. who, on account 
of the fog, did not wish to attack. He could 
not signal to call us off, and hearing our 
guns was forced to advance and support 
us. Soon we heard his howitzers, but as 



HUNTING INDIANS IN A FOG. 



107 




GROUP OF WARM SPRING INDIANS, 

the gunners could not see where they were 
sending their shells, they soon stopped fir- 
ing. Then came volleys of musketry and 
the cheers of charging troops, and we had 
the pleasure of hearing a great fight with- 



out being in it. Nor could we get in it very 
well, for our friends were sending showers 
of lead over us, obliging us to keep down. 
Finally the fog broke up Gen. Wheaton's 
attack. His men became scattered; many 
came through the stronghold, to our lines, 
and others fell back. Occasionally the fog 
would lift a little, and then pot-shots at 
short range were in order, with the disad- 
vantage that we were in the pot, while the 
Modocs could keep under cover. So it 
went on until well toward evening, when 
Gen. Wheaton managed to signal to us to 
fall back. At dusk we returned to our camp 
of the preceding night, where wounds were 
dressed, and preparations made for the 
march to our permanent camp. About 
midnight we started. Those of our wound- 
ed who could ride were mounted on capt- 
ured ponies. Others were carried in 
blankets, with a bearer at each corner. It 
was a night of horror. The worn-out 
bearers would frequently stumble over the 
rough rocks, letting their burdens fall, and 
the groans of the poor fellows, so roughly 
handled, were heart-rending. It was after 
sunrise when we staggered into camp at 
Land's ranche, tired, sleepy, hungry and 
footsore. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY G. C. DEWEY, 

AMONG THE TREE TOPS, ON SNOWSHOES. 





STAVE ISLAND, ST. LAWRENCE RIVER; SITE OF '98 MEET, A. C. A. 

Proposed location for mess tent and headquarters ; looking toward the river. 




STAVE ISLAND, ST. LAWRENCE RIVER. 
North end of headquarters track. 



108 





STAVE ISLAND, ST. LAWRENCE RIVER; SQUAW POINT, FROM HEADQUARTERS. 




BEFORE THE RUN. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY DR. R. R. HALL. 



IOg 



TO SAVE THE MUSKALONGE. 



BEN S. DEAN. 



Jamestown, N. Y. 
Editor Recreation: I hand you here- 
with a picture of one of the magnificent 
muskalonge which inhabit the waters of 
Chautauqua lake, and which the Chautau- 
qua Fish and Game Association seeks to 
protect from the wanton destruction inci- 




A BIG MUSKALONGE. 
Length, 50J inches ; girth, 26I inches ; weight, 39! pounds. 

dent to ice fishing, with coops, spears and 
other contrivances. 

This fish was taken with a hook and line, 
by one of our members, and weighed 39^4 
pounds. It was 50^2 inches long, and had 
a girth of 26^4 inches. 

For the past few years the state has been 
engaged in artificial propagation, in the 
waters of Chautauqua lake, with special 
reference to the muskalonge; and there are 
now large numbers of these fish which take 
the hook readily, affording a liberal food 
supply for the summer hotels and cottages. 

By the provisions of Chapter 705 of the 
laws of 1897, forced through the legislature 
at the demand of a few professional fish- 



ermen, these muskalonge may be taken 
with spears, during the first 20 days of 
February. Our association is seeking to 
have this law amended, and to bring Chau- 
tauqua lake under the operations of the 
general law of this state; believing that in 
this way only can the supply of muskalonge 
be kept up. 

It is estimated by those who have 
watched the denuding of these waters, on 
former occasions, when spearing was per- 
mitted, that at least 3,000 fishing coops, 
each containing a man armed with a spear 
and decoys, would be found on the ice with 
the opening of February, on a body of 
water about 20 miles long and from 2 to 3 
miles wide. If this should prove true, no 
doubt there would be literally tons of these 
fish taken; and certainly 2 or 3 years of 
this kind of fishing would leave the waters 
of Chautauqua lake as barren as the Sahara 
desert. 

The position taken by this association is 
that Chautauqua lake is public water; that 
it belongs, in common, to the people of the 
state of New York, and that there is no 
possible justification for making it subject 
to a special statute, which enables the few, 
within a short distance, to wantonly butch- 
er and exterminate the game fishes which 
have been developed in this lake at the ex- 
pense of the people at large. The waters 
are now sufficiently stocked, if the fish are 
taken only in a legitimate manner, and 
during the open season, as fixed for the 
state, outside of Chautauqua county, to 
afford an ample supply of fish food, and 
ideal sport. The Chautauqua Fish and 
Game Association, with a petition bearing 
more than 4,000 names, will ask the legis- 
lature to disregard local selfish interests, 
to do its duty and to aid in the protection 
of these fish. 

We believe this represents the real in- 
terest, not alone of the state, but the im- 
portant property interests surrounding 
Chautauqua lake, as well as those of the 
professional fishermen, who now seek to 
kill the goose that lays the golden egg. 

We want every reader of Recreation, 
by personal effort directed to the senator 
and assemblyman from his district, to aid 
us in this undertaking. We shall no doubt 
be opposed by the leader of the majority 
in the assembly, only one town of whose 
district borders on this lake, but whose 
concessions to politicians have prompted 
him to identify himself with this policy. 




PHOTO BY G. A. CONRADI. 

A NOVEL BACKGROUND. 



PHOTO BY G. A. CONRADI. 

OLD MORAVIAN CHURCH. 



A NEAT SOUVENIR. 

Make a 4 x 5 negative, of a leaf of any 
kind, or a bunch of flowers with long 
stems, against a white background. A 
large card will answer. 

When the negative is dry cover a part of 
it, about 1^2 x 2 inches, with a piece of 
black paper, by pasting it on the negative. 
This will leave a pure white space, on 
which any small landscape or portrait 
may be printed by covering the first part 
printed with black paper, in which an open- 
ing has been cut the exact size of the piece 
which covered the first negative. 

In this manner large prints may be re- 
duced and by double printing any variety 
of designs may be obtained. 

Care must be taken to print both the 
same depth; also to match the opening. 
The latter is important, for if not neatly 
done a white margin will show in the fin- 
ished print. A. C. 



Old Winter comes upon the scene 
With rumble, rush and roar; 

And just behind him comes the chap 
Who never shuts the door. 

—Truth. 



" Several months ago Jones was kicking 
against hard times." 

" What is he doing now? " 

" He's kicking against prosperity." 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. A. THOMPSON. 

WHO WANTS IT? 



He- 
She- 



-I have money to burn. 
-Let's strike a match. 

— Jackson Patriot. 



AN ALBINO DEER. 



W. H. N. 



On a bright, crisp morning in October, 
1891, we were hunting deer in the Craw- 
ford Notch. We were in joyous mood. 
To climb the mountains, to view their 




ALBINO DEER. 

Supposed to be in the transitory state. From mounted 
specimen. Photo kindly loaned by B. W. Kilburn. 

mighty chasms, to touch them in their soli- 
tude and feel that for the moment they 
were ours, was an inspiration; and when in 
addition anticipation of the chase light- 
ened our steps, sharpened our senses and 
magnified the surrounding glories of nat- 
ure — what more could we wish? 

In choosing our hunting ground little 
did we think we should see the majesty 
of the silent hills rivaled by the beauty of a 
living creature. Bing and Leader had 
that day as noble a quarry as ever dogs 
chased; and so quickly did the hunt begin 



that we could hardly accept their call as in 
earnest. Soon there could be no doubt. 
Clear rose the music of the baying hounds, 
a round of notes and echoes, bounding 
from side to side against the rocky walls 
of the notch. Away it sped into the dis- 
tance, growing fainter and fainter until 
nearly lost to hearing; then swelled again, 
and we knew the chase had turned. The 
stiain ebbed and flowed, but every mo- 
ment came nearer. Then steady and 
strong, louder at every leap, confident and 
earnest — the music swept down the glen 
toward us. Was it instinct or strategy 
that shaped the course of the deer? With 
a sudden turn it broke away, for the river, 
and took to the water far below us. 

Panting from our rush down the moun- 
tain side, we reached the bank and found 
the dogs working as for life, to untangle 
the thread so cunningly snarled, and to dis- 
cover where the pursued had left the water. 
Silently and patiently they worked, circling 
and dashing here and there, until from a 
thicket, a snow-white deer flashed and 
sped away. Was it a living thing that took 
such bounds? Over bush and brake it 
went, and for a moment we were spell- 
bound — pausing between scrutiny and won- 
der. 

With such a flight, we could not wait 
for admiration and mercy to contend with 
us, and with a flash and a sharp report 
the deadly rifle destroyed God's handiwork. 
The albino deer — a masterpiece of animal 
creation — a moment since full of life and 
spirit of grace and gentleness, lay dead 
before us. Another graceful, gentle, harm- 
less creature had fallen a victim to that 
primeval lust of slaughter which yet cor- 
rodes the hearts of men. O sportsman! 
where is your heart that you can do these 
things? Where is your love for Nature, 
that you can blot out the only life given to 
a beautiful and innocent creature? 



CANADIAN FISHING. 



JOHN BOYD. 



One morning in July, '96, 2 men might 
have been seen hauling sundry packages 
of camp dunnage, provisions and other 
truck, to one of the railway stations in To- 
ronto. This was one of the preliminaries 
to a much-talked-of outing to the famous 

Sparrow lake. Ed. C , an all-round 

hunter and angler, was one; I the other. 

One inexperienced in the ways of camp- 
ing might have thought we were provid- 



ing for an exploration to the Arctic circle, 
and that the population of a whole school- 
section was to go with us, but, we were 
taking our families; in all, a party of 8. 

We traveled by rail to Severn station, 
where a snug little steamer was ready to 
take us down the beautiful Severn river, 
to Sparrow lake. Night found us com- 
fortably ensconced under canvas. 

The following morning we were out 



"3 



ii4 



RECREA TION. 



early, getting ready for the capture of mus- 
kalonge (Esox nobilor), giving no thought 
as to how its name should be spelled or 
even pronounced. 

As the Hibernian put it, " Our first catch 
was a miss." Ed. soon had a strike, and 
commenced to play the fish, but Esox had 
no intention of being gaffed. After show- 
ing us his size, by sundry leaps out of the 
water, the fish parted the line. 

Shortly after, a 4-pounder was hooked 
and safely landed, so we had at least a taste 
of fish for breakfast, even if we grumbled 
all day at the luck that lost us the big one. 



A spurt with the paddle, a sudden "buck- 
ing " by the fish, and another yard of the 
line was brought in. This was repeated 
many times before I reached the edge of 
the weeds, where my quarry took a deep 
plunge, to free himself from the hook; but 
it was no use. With much anxiety and a 
greater pride, he was finally brought along- 
side, and the landing net placed under him; 
then into the canoe he was flopped. 

Ed. had repeated my experience in all 
its details. As we compared yarns, with 
the 2 specimens before us, there was a de- 
cision of an inch or so in his favor. They 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY JOHN BOYD. 

" MUSKALONGE AND THE IMPLEMENTS OF HIS TAKING OFF." 



Toward evening we added 2 more to our 
count, and might have done better had we 
desired; but our intentions were to only 
keep the camp supplied, with perhaps an 
occasional one to a city friend. 

The time between our fishing trips was 
interspersed with tramps through the 
woods, after huckleberries; in studying 
the ornithology of the vicinity; and in 
enjoying nature. 

Coming back from one of these rambles, 
which was by water part of the way, I 
threw a line astern of the canoe, and held 
the end between my teeth, having little 
thought of what might take the spinning 
spoon. Soon a jerk that threatened the 
safety of my teeth, and a plunge, told of a 
hooked fish. The strain on the line, as I 
took it in my hands and worked in a few 
feet, made it manifest that he was a fair- 
sized one. 



were indeed rare fish, weighing 10 and 12 
pounds, respectively. 

The pickerel (Slizostcdium vitreuin) is 
usually given a second place in piscatorial 
lore; but as a food fish he is placed by 
many next to the trout. They are numer- 
ous in these waters, and there was no diffi- 
culty in securing as many as we desired. 
They gave us good sport, and we often 
caught them long after dark, when we 
could not see the ends of our rods. 

Sparrow lake is as much noted for its 
black bass as for its muskalonge. Almost 
every day we had for company some mem- 
bers of the Iron City Camping Club, of 
Pittsburgh, as well as several Indians from 
the Rama reservation. 

In fishing we used live frogs, worms and 
spoon baits. It was always well to have a 
supply of each on hand, for the taste of the 
fish varied from day to day. 



CANADIAN FISHING. 



"5 






The water of the lake is so clear that 
under strong sunlight the fishes' move- 
ments can be seen away down a dozen feet. 
For this reason we did our fishing before 
10 o'clock in the forenoon and after 3 in 
the afternoon. The early morning was the 
best time in which to catch the big ones. 

We usually trolled over, or along the 
edges of the beds of " pickerel " weeds, but 
in a few places where the " lunge " grass 
was found, our luck was the best. Small 
fry of every kind infest these beds: perch, 
pickerel, bass, and sunfish hide in the dark 
recesses, but in reality they are there for 
the muskalonge to feed on. So swift is the 
latter's dart that not a fish escapes when it 
is singled out as a victim. 

The settlers in the vicinity were kind, and 
we passed many pleasant hours in their 
company. One morning a good old Ger- 
man woman, a widow, came to camp, and 
inquired if we had any fish we could give 
her. As it happened, we were without a 
fin. On telling her so, she took on a 
mournful look, and gave free vent to her 



feelings. "Veil, veil! Doo bad! I haf 
von man hired to rakes mine grass. I haf 
lots of salt pork, but if he eats dot, he 
drinks und drinks und drinks so mooch, 
dot he not verk von haf his dime; but if 
I onlys haf some fish to gif him he nots 
gets dhirsty and verks mitout mooch 
drinks." 

The ladies of the camp devoted some 
time to fishing, but the greater part of their 
holiday was, I think, given up to watching 
for the widow's red bull. This animal, if 
he was within a mile of camp, always 
thought it the proper thing to come over 
for a friendly call. As at these times the 
male population, including the dogs, was 
generally absent, his presence caused a fu- 
rore that lasted until his next visit; and 
there is sometimes a shudder even now. 

If the readers of Recreation would have 
good black bass, pickerel and muskalonge 
fishing, where one can at the same time en- 
joy as fine scenery as Canada affords, they 
should visit Sparrow lake and its river, the 
Kaw-she-she-bog-a-mog. 




ELK IN THE TETON FOOT HILLS. 
From a photo kindly loaned by E. H. Maberly. 



I send you herewith a photograph of a 
band of elk, numbering some 1,500, which 
may interest your readers. It was taken 
just after the elk had been dogged away 
from some hay stacks, over in the Teton 
country. 

Your mind may revert to the time 



when such scenes were common in this 
Western country. We rarely see so large 
a band of elk now; yet there are enough 
left to stock a vast territory if properly pro- 
tected, and judiciously hunted, by sports- 
men. 

Dr. E. H. Maberly, Boise City, Idaho. 




OUT OF MEAT. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. H. SHlbLEK. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY REV. G. R. STONE. 

EARLY SPRING ON THE SUSQUEHANNA. 



116 



ELKLAND. 

VI. 

DUELS. 

ERNEST SETON THOMPSON. 



We were sitting in a Parisian Garden, in 
1891 some student friends and I, when the 
■conversation turned on Landseer*s "stags," 
and more especially on those pictures 
representing stag fights. One of our num- 
ber, an Englishman, with a turn for univer- 
sal ridicule, was most unsparing in his 
humorous criticisms of these pictures. He 
characterized the incidents in them as 
picturesque but baseless fictions. 

" I went," said he, " to Lord X's park, in 
the proper season, on purpose to see a stag- 
fight. I saw several; but they were simply 



" ' Look out; you are hurting me.' 

" ' Oh, excuse me,' and they would sepa- 
rate again. 

"After 10 minutes' rest, one would say: 
' Are you ready? ' 

" ' No, not quite.' 

" Ten minutes later, both were ready. 
They advanced gently and locked horns; 
but one said: 

" ' A little lower on the left, please. 
Hold on there, that's not comfortable. 
Now, that's right; are you ready? ' 

" ' Yes — no, hold on, till I get my left 




OUR SHANTY AT YANCEY'S. 



ludicrous fiascos — as absurd as a French 
duel. After some 2 or 3 days' preliminary, 
bellowing, challenges and exchanges of po- 
lite notes, 2 stags would amicably agree to 
fight. Any does that might be about took 
not the slightest notice of the affair, know- 
ing, I suppose, it was merely a matter of 
form. 

" After making some magnificent dem- 
onstrations, at a safe distance apart, the 2 
stags walked gently near each other, po- 
litely lowering their horns as they ap- 
proached, and I heard the following con- 
versation: 

" ' Are you ready? ' 

"'Yes. Are you?' 

" ' Yes.' 

" ' Then come on.' 
' Come on yourself, I've come half 
way.' 

" Then they gently closed, locked horns 
with much elaborate precision and. at an- 
other signal, commenced to push. After 
politely pushing for a few seconds, one 
would say: 



hind foot placed. There now — gently. 
Now push.' 

"'Hold on! my foot slipped, and your 
left brow antler is scratching my ear.' 

" ' Let's change grips.' 

" ' There, now, that's much better. Push 
now.' 

" ' Oh, I say, you are too rough! I won't 
play any more; I'm going to join the 
ladies.' 

" That," said our cynic, " is a typical 
stag fight — all there is of it — and Land- 
seer's tragic battles were fought only in 
his mind." 

No doubt my satirical friend saw pretty 
much what he described; but I do not 
doubt that Landseer did too. Collateral 
evidence for both may be derived from 
Elkland testimony. 

•I raised the subject at one of the camp 
fire meetings, in the park. The ring of a 
dozen quiet smokers who sat in front of 
our cabin, at Yancey's, was composed 
chiefly of hunters. 

Yancey himself had an interesting contri- 



117 



u8 



RECREA TION. 



bution to offer. Last fall while riding on 
the upland, near Tower creek, he heard a 
great noise of conflict, rattling antlers, 
crashing branches, etc.; and on drawing 
near he saw 3 pairs of bull elk fighting. 
Two pairs were fencing in a harmless way, 
but the other pair were " right into it for 
blood; " i.e., it was evidently a fight to a 
finish and no quarter. 

They were so engrossed he could have 
touched them; but he left them to settle it 
among themselves. 

Woody told of another affair. Not long 
ago he came on a scrubby, open place, of 
about 5 acres, which was everywhere rooted 
up, trampled down and ploughed over by a 



reach the lush grass, with which he was sur- 
rounded, told a sad tale of prolonged and 
dreadful suffering. 

Other mountain men told tales that 
showed it is a common thing for stags to 
be killed in these duels; and it seems death 
usually results from one having his neck 
broken, or else from inadvertently expos- 
ing his flank to a single thrust from his ad- 
versary's antlers. 

While exploring a little ravine, yesterday, 
I found a magnificent pair of antlers, hid- 
den under a rock. I brought them to camp, 
and found them no light burden. They 
were the largest I have ever handled; 




THE HORNS I FOUND. 



pair of fighting elk. Small trees were 
broken off, huge logs and rocks displaced 
or broken and 2 Durham bulls could not 
have made more havoc. And there, lying 
prone in the middle of the battlefield was 
the vanquished one; his neck broken and 
his flank ripped open. Probably the latter 
was the result of the conqueror's final 
thrust. 

The vanquished was a large bull, but ap- 
parently he had met a larger. 

A. A. A. said that near his ranch he once 
found 2 large elk, with interlocked antlers. 
Both were dead, and there was abundant 
evidence of a prolonged and desperate 
fight. One bull's neck was broken, but the 
other, unable to free himself from his vic- 
tim, had died of starvation. The indica- 
tions of the unhappy victor's struggles to 



though I think I have seen larger in muse- 
ums. 

Though very large these horns had but 
the ordinary number of points, and were 
without palmations or peculiar feature, ex- 
cepting their absolute symmetry. 

This last is considered of prime impor- 
tance, among hunters, though I never 
could see any reason why it should be. 

While we were examining these antlers 
Amos Hague, the guide, came up and said: 
" Hello! you've got my antlers. You 
found them at such a place " (describing 
the exact spot). " I can tell you their 
whole history. A year ago the elk that 
grew them wintered in this barnyard, with 
about 50 others. He was not by any means 
the largest bull in the bunch, but he had the 
finest antlers; and I says to myself if I can 




spot them, when they drop, those antlers 
are mine. 

" Well, he dropped them both together, 
in the spring, on the hill where you found 
them, and I cached them, in case some 
dude from the East should want to shoot 
an elk, with a record breaking pair of 
horns." 

Let me revert to the student group, in 
the garden. 

One asked, " What is the greatest thing 
in a picture? " 

Another replied, " Drawing." 



A third, " Expression." 

A fourth, " The artist." 

A fifth, " Sentiment," and explained sen- 
timent as " the thing in the picture that 
impressed the beholder, as the original did 
the artist." 

Now, with this truth in mind, I fearlessly 
reproduce a sketch, made by a member of 
the other circle mentioned, to illustrate the 
fight between 3 pairs of bull elk, and I do 
not hesitate to claim that it will be found 
possessed of more real sentiment, and illus- 
trative power, than a dozen kodak shots 
could possibly offer. 



AMONG THE REEDS. 



WILMOT TOWNSEND. 



A keen wind is rustling the reeds about 
me. I can almost imagine I hear them 
whispering together in a dry, husky voice, 
as they tremble to the intermittent gusts 
that swirl about the marsh, in the gray of 
this November dawn. 

It is cosey here in the punt as I lie at 
length looking up at the stars, that tell in 
crisp sparkles of the coming of an ideal 
day. 

Insensibly they grow wan and pale; a 
tinge of color creeps along the horizon, 
a short half hour, and morning has come 
to the world again. 

High in air a bunch of black ducks 
drift before the wind, their breasts all 
ruddy with the sunrise. I know by their 
flight they will drop in the marsh; for 
while I watch them they string out at in- 
tervals in a broken line, only to close up 
into a compact flock a moment later. 

Now they vanish beyond the reed tops 
in an undulating line like a wisp of wind 
driven leaves. No decoys are needed here. 
I am located at the entrance of the marsh, 
a favorite spot for morning shooting, the 
fowl always taking this route when high 



winds are abroad on the lake. Just inside 
the last bend of the creek, where it turns 
to the open water, I sit in my punt, ready 
for developments. 

A few hundred yards in front and be- 
yond me the woods run down to the marsh, 
and although keyed up to high tension as 
I keep my eyes playing right and left in the 
direction of the bend, I cannot help feel- 
ing the beauty of my surroundings. 

The wind has fallen with the rising sun, 
and as he mounts to higher levels behind 
me his glancing rays touch the woods. 
Like magic they kindle and glow with 
wondrous autumn colors. 

Hark! Mam-ph! There is a mallard 
somewhere about. 

Mam-phi Mam-ph! how distinctly I 
hear him in the stillness that holds the 
marsh. 

There he comes swimming round the 
bend! 

I'm bound to give him a chance, and will 
not pot him. Let him swim up, then I'll 
flush him, and take him as he rises. 

Ah — he hesitates and silently sheers off 
toward the other side of the creek, then 



"9 





X'u 



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A 







.. — - , - - * * * ' / ) ' ' ' ivi m> j"- i jji lu" ii» , ■ ' -^- - — - ^*-i^~ ^^ 




"SUDDENLY ARRESTING HIS FLIGHT HE HOVERS IN MID-AIR." 



back. Now he circles, but with all his 
manoeuvring I notice he does not advance 
a foot in my direction. 

What an exquisite life study he would 
make with the play of light and shade, as 
it shifts with every turn of his superb head; 
now a rich golden green as the sunlight 
glances from the feathers; now dark as he 
enters the shade of the reeds. 

Whirr-r-rr! he is up and off, back to the 
lake again. 

His actions said plainly that something 
was wrong with my cover, and inspection 
shows me he was right, for I find the stern 
of my punt is clear of the reeds. 

When I felt my way here in the dark, I 
did not push in as far as I should, and so 
that mallard's life was saved at any rate — 
perhaps! 

A single thrust with an oar suffices, and 
now, provided the crows will only keep 
away, I'll wager there is not a duck on 
Lake Champlain will suspect what is lurk- 
ing here this lovely morning. 

Burr-r-r! a kingfisher rattles by, and 
right on his heels a pair of black ducks 
swing round the bend, just skimming the 
water. 



Bang! — Bang! — they keep on skimming, 
a trifle more rapidly to be sure, but still 
skimming all right. Of course I did not 
lead them properly. I knew that instantly, 
for the shot cut- the water into foam 2 feet 
or more behind them. 

Wild fowl glide along so smoothly that 
one is often deceived as to their speed and 
frequently an easy shot is missed by lack 
of proper appreciation of this fact. There! 
that's better. A hen mallard plumps into 
the creek breast down, and is feebly swim- 
ming in circles, her head under water the 
while. Presently she floats, still, lifeless, 
with head below the surface as though 
feeding. No need to 'gather her yet; there 
is no current to carry her down. 

Here comes my kingfisher friend again. 
Suddenly arresting his flight he hovers in 
mid-air directly over the duck, with big, 
ungainly head and erected crest, seemingly 
lost in surprise at the strange inertness of 
the body. Astonishment apparently holds 
him mute for the time, till, his wonder 
passed, he clatters off down the creek. 

No use waiting longer; the promise of 
the morning has failed and Indian summer 
still holds the lake and land enthralled. 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 



121 



No blustering gale to drive the fowl to 
the quiet marsh; so I pick up my iloating 
breakfast, and am off down the lake, well 
content with the privilege of living if only 
to breathe this glorious air. 

Fresh from Heaven it seems to come, 



bearing the fragrance of the woods just 
awakened to life by the sunshine. 

"Tis life! pure exhilarating life, and as I 
breathe it I rejoice that, unlike the air of 
crowded cities, " it has never been used 
before." 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 



A. J. STONE. 



Editor Recreation: I have just re- 
turned from a trip into the Chee-on-nees, 
where I secured a goodly number of sheep, 
and those too the ones I most wanted. 
Since my trip into these mountains last 
year the Indians seem to have taken special 
delight in hunting there and have driven 
the animals back and scattered them badly. 

A Mr. Reed came out of these moun- 
tains, just before I started in, having failed 
to get even a single animal; but my ar- 
rangements having been all made I deter- 
mined to try. 

Two days of hard hunting, after main 
camp was reached, served to justify Mr. 
Reed's failure. Early on the third morning 
we were preparing for a move. A few 
pounds of rolled oats and a small strip of 
bacon were taken for food. Some salt, for 
skins; the camera and plates, one pair of 
blankets each, and our guns constituted 
our outfit. Everything else was left at our 
first or main camp. 

We started directly back through the 
mountains, having planned for a trip of 
several days. Late in the afternoon of the 
first day, while crossing the level top of a 
high mountain ridge, we sighted a bunch 
of sheep. 

Making a short detour we approached 
them, from behind a low butte, to within 
about 400 yards. They were quietly feed- 
ing, in a beautiful little meadow, and the 
surroundings were such that we could not 
get any nearer; so we devoted some time 
to watching them, through our glasses. 

There were 7 lambs and the rest of the 
herd, numbering about 20 head, consisted 
of ewes anc young rams. Two of the rams 
finally came near enough for a safe shot; 
but I declined the opportunity as ewes and 
lambs were more particularly wanted and 
we did not wish to alarm the band. Besides 
I was anxious to study the movements of 
these animals undisturbed. We retired 
some 2 miles, where we found a small 
brush thicket and camped for the night. 

We followed the sheep, from morning 
until night, for 2 days before we turned our 
rifles loose; but the time was well spent. 

Having now secured some good speci- 
mens we once more returned to our main 



camp, from which point we continued the 
hunt with good success. 

The last day out, while returning to 
camp without hope of seeing anything, we 
discovered 2 sheep walking along the crest 
of a high ridge above us. With the aid of 
the glasses we saw they were a ewe and a 
lamb. I wanted one more such pair, and 
this was the chance. Though very tired 
and hungry, up that long climb we went, 
Harry Pidgeon and I, the third man going 
on to camp. We were so long reaching the 
top of the ridge I feared we might lose 
track of the sheep; but we ran on to them 
in 30 minutes after gaining the summit. 
The ewe and lamb were then in company 
with 2 young rams and they were all good 
healthy specimens, the ewe and lamb prov- 
ing exceptionally good. 

Harry gave me the lead, after we located 
the animals, and therefore failed to get in 
at the killing. I was carrying my 30-40 
Winchester single shot rifle, and Harry 
was carrying my 30-40 Winchester re- 
peater. The ewe was first to sight me and 
started to run. Then she stopped and" 
turned around to satisfy her curiosity. At 
that moment she caught a bullet in the 
sticking place and went down instantly. 
Just then one of the young rams ran up on 
to a little ridge to locate the trouble and 
got a bullet in his shoulder. Next to come 
was the lamb, and it received a ball in the 
same place as did its mother. 

The other young ram had fled without 
coming to see me, and when I again got 
sight of him he was working his way over 
a rough, steep, rocky ledge, about 400 
yards away. I took a rest, adjusted the Ly- 
man sights and fired, overshooting from 
one to 2 feet. The next shot went home 
however and I had the satisfaction of end- 
ing that last day's hunt in the Chee-on- 
nees with success. Next the camera, which 
I carry all the time when hunting. Then 
the measuring and skinning. 

Two very tired and hungry men reached 
camp at midnight, with their heavy loads, 
not having tasted food since 5 in the morn- 
ing — 19 hours. 

We ate our supper, if supper it might be 
called, went to the stream, washed our 



122 



RECREA TION. 



sheep skins, put them out of the reach of 
varmints and retired, happy and well sat- 
isfied with our day's work. 

We had also secured a number of small 
mammal skins and we now set to work to 
prepare our stuff to be taken out of the 
mountains. When we reached Telegraph 
Creek my pack was found to weigh just 
98 pounds, not including hunting coat or 
gun. Such is the pleasure of collecting 
natural history specimens in remote moun- 
tainous districts. 

A few days will be spent here, among the 
Thaltans, collecting such history as I may, 
concerning the tribe; learning of their 
traditions; getting measurements of a num- 
ber of them; photographing a few typical 
faces, and securing all possible information 
concerning fur bearing and game animals 
within their territory, etc. 

We will then go to the head of Dease 
lake, 70 miles farther, and from there we 



go about 15 miles into the hills, for wood- 
land caribou. 

Leaving the lake October 1st we shall 
go down Dease river, through the country 
of the Kaskas, and from the mouth of 
Dease (its confluence with the Liard) we 
go down the Liard about 100 miles, where 
we expect to make headquarters for the 
winter. We shall then be about 600 miles 
from the coast. 

Below this point, on the Liard, there is 
a series of very bad rapids, around which 
portages are made, in summer, by canoe- 
men. One of these rapids is 7 miles.long 
and means a great deal of labor, where 
there is much luggage. We expect to 
avoid all of this by using the frozen river, 
in winter, for a roadway, and will sleigh 
our baggage about 90 miles before the 
river breaks up. From the point thus 
reached we will have good canoeing all the 
way to the Mackenzie. 



AT ROUND LAKE, IN THE ADIRONDACKS. 



SEAVER A. MILLER. 



Dr. J. C. Russell, Fred. F. Sorvell, Fred. 
J. Balch and A. Clark went to Round lake, 
in the autumn of '96, for a deer hunt. Our 
camp was at the foot of Ampersand moun- 
tain, about 10 miles from the village of 
Saranac. It was the time of the full moon, 
and the Doctor, being of a romantic turn of 
mind, suggested making the trip by moon- 
light. 

Accordingly at 7 o'clock, on the evening 
of October 2d, we launched our skiffs. The 
night was perfect. We were all in excellent 
spirits, and almost before we were aware 
of it we found ourselves in the centre of 
Lower Saranac. After resting and re- 
freshing ourselves we continued the jour- 
ney, passing through Cluster bay, sur- 
rounded by its numerous green islands; 
past " the bluff," through " the narrows," 
where the projecting shores vainly en- 
deavor to meet, and thence to the head of 
the lake and into the Saranac river, which 
is the outlet of Round or Middle Saranac 
lake — our destination. 

The distance from middle to lower lakes, 
is about 3 miles, and is made by following 
up the winding river, in which are heavy 
falls. At one side of these falls is a pas- 
sage way of planks, where passers to and 
fro may walk and tow their boats. 

The Doctor and I had little difficulty in 
urging our craft through, and we soon 
passed the narrow outlet and were sailing 
on the calm, placid waters of Round lake. 
Tn 15 minutes more we were at our camp. 
The work of unloading our boats, prepar- 



ing fuel, etc. was soon accomplished, and 
before 10 o'clock the camp was in order, 
the fire roaring and the kettle singing a 
mepry song. Then each man hung his Win- 
chester or Marlin, and his double barrel 
shot gun, in the rack, and revolvers and 
cartridge belts were arranged. After sup- 
per comfortable beds of balsam boughs 
were made, and with plenty of blankets, an 
abundance of provisions, and everything 
needful for perfect enjoyment, we sat 
around the blazing camp fire and arranged 
for the morrow's hunt. 

It was decided that Balch should watch 
the South Creek territory, that the Doctor 
should be stationed on the sand beach, mid- 
way between Turtle point and the Amper- 
sand trail, and that Sorvell and I were to 
keep our eyes open that no deer crossed 
the river. He chose to watch at the hay- 
stack, on the shore of the river, and I was 
to be stationed at a leaning cedar tree, a 
short distance below. 

There is something remarkable about 
that haystack. It seems to have perpetual 
life. I have been there every fall, for 
years, and no matter how demolished it be- 
came, by our continual climbing on it, it 
always stood as erect and looked as fresh 
as ever, when I came to watch at it the fol- 
lowing season. It also seems to have a 
special attraction for deer; for I have never 
hunted in its vicinity when at least one deer 
was not shot by the man stationed at the 
stack. 

At 7 o'clock, we were all at our stations, 



A CUTE OLD FOX. 



123 



and soon we heard the distant baying of 
the hounds, on the mountain side. The day 
was perfect. A slight breeze came from the 
mountain, bringing to our ears every note 
uttered by the dogs, from which the deer 
was fleeing for his life. 

Every man was quietly but anxiously 
watching every foot of shore within his 
view, for the approach of the noble animal. 
The baying of the hounds, which at first 
seemed to grow louder, was beginning to 
be fainter. The deer had apparently headed 
for Loon or Pope bay, in the Lower Sar- 
anac. Soon all sounds of the dogs ceased, 
and nothing was heard but the dismal 
"caw!" "caw!" of a crow, or the occa- 
sional drumming of a grouse. At last the 
music of the hounds again reached our ears, 
and grew louder and louder until it seemed 
the dogs were within a stone's throw. I 
could hear the crackling of the underbrush 
in the woods, and momentarily expected to 
see the deer break cover. But no! The 
frightened animal plunged on, and a few 
minutes later came the dog, emitting a loud, 
sharp bark at every bound. My heart beat 
rapidly. The perspiration stood in heavy 
drops on my brow. The excitement was 
intense. Soon the report of a rifle woke 
the echoes, followed by 2 others in quick 
succession. I waited a half hour in silence, 
but hearing nothing more, rowed rapidly 
to the haystack. Here I found an old man, 
who, in trembling tones, told me a buck 
had shortly before come in, directly above 
the haystack— that a young man had shot 
him, and, loading him into his boat, had 
disappeared up the stream. Seeing the old 
man carried a gun, I asked him if he had 
fired at the deer. 

" No," he said; " I tried to, but the gun 
wouldn't go." Examining his rifle, I found 
that, in his excitement, he had failed to 
bring the breech to place, and so was 
cheated out of his shot. 



Rowing rapidly to camp, I found all the 
party there, save Clark, and a 4 prong buck- 
hanging, head downward, from a tree. The 
mail agent sat modestly in the back ground, 
wiping his brow and trying to hide his ex- 
citement, but could not. 

The second day 2 of our dogs drove deer 
to water not commanded by any of us, 
while the third drove in a spike horn buck, 
which was captured by Mr. Balch. 

The third day was the banner day of the 
hunt. Three deer were driven into Round 
lake and captured. Two of these were does, 
and the third, a buck, was proudly towed 
ashore by the Doctor. 

Our photographer took pictures of the 
camp, the deer, and the party, after which 
we held a jollification meeting. Every- 
thing was again packed securely, the boats 
loaded, and the homeward journey begun. 

After all, I cannot conscientiously say I 
approve of this method of hunting deer. 
To set hounds on" the track of the most 
noble animal that roams the forest, forc- 
ing him to seek refuge in the water, every 
avenue to which is guarded by armed men, 
who shoot down the game in cold blood, 
while it is desperately and helplessly strug- 
gling for liberty, seems to me nothing less 
than slaughter. It has nothing in it to 
commend it to true sportsmen. 

Should all methods of hunting deer, save 
still-hunting, be abolished, I believe that 
in less than 5 years any novice could enter 
these woods, alone, unaided and kill his 
deer. 

Let man place his superior knowledge 
against the instinct of the animal and each 
is on an equal footing. If the hunter, by 
his ingenuity, can steal upon and bag his 
game, without resorting to unfair methods, 
he will enjoy the sport and be entitled to 
the reward; but if the deer can cunningly 
outwit him, he has earned his liberty and 
should be allowed it. 



A CUTE OLD FOX. 



EUGENE C. DERBY. 



" Speakin' about fox huntin'," began 
Lon, " I had a strange experience once, an' 
while it sounds a little like some of the 
stories we read, I ain't spinnin' no yarns 
'thout a ghost of a foundation. 

" One mornin' in October, a number of 
years ago, Sol and I took our hounds, 
Hunter and Tige, and struck through the 
burnt patch, toward the South ridges; 
where we felt certain of startin' a fox with- 
out much fuss. 

" Sol took the dogs along the base of the 
Little mountain ridges, to skirt the edge of 
the Basin; while I hustled off toward Whit- 



tier hill. I was purty well blowed when at 
last I climbed the ridge an' gained my old 
stand, on the top of the June-grass knoll; 
an' I hadn't waited 5 minutes afore I heard 
Hunter open up, more 'n a mile .away. 

"The dogs circled once or twice; Hun- 
ter soundin', now and then, in a deep, mel- 
low bass that was rich music, I can tell ye; 
while Tige jest kep' his nose to the trail 
and led off like a drum major. I could see 
'em once in a while, as they figured around 
among the scrub trees in the old orchard 
under Felch hill. 

" Well, by-'n-by Sol showed up on the 



124 



RECREA T/OJST. 



crest of the Basin ridge, a»' then I heard 
Hunter's long-drawn ' bo-o-o,' as he sud- 
denly gave voice; followed by Tige, which 
told that the game was started. 

" The fox quit the orchard and headed 
straight for 'the Basin. I knew by the way 
'he was off .he was an old one, and so I kep' 
a purty sharp lookout; for I more'n half 
suspected there might be a litter round. I 
had waited some 5 minutes, when I saw a 
fox pop out of the thick spruce across a 
little holler, and stop and turn his head to 
hear the hounds. I was jest over the ridge 
and out of sight, but too far away to shoot. 
I soon discovered Hunter and Tige were 
pullin' straight for the big mountain, an' 
then it flashed on me this was not their 
game. 

" As I couldn't kill him where he stood, 
I thought I would try callin' him. I 
crouched low an' then squeaked once or 
twice, like a mouse. At first he didn't hear 
me; but next time it was louder, and you 
oughter seen that fox prick up his ears and 
listen! I squeaked again, an' he started. 
Down the hill he came, like a cat after a 
bird. I pulled back the hammer of the old 
gun 'thout makin' a sound. I expected to 
see his nose come up over the grass any 
minute, an' I had my eye right along the 
bar'l, waitin'. 

" He didn't show up, so by-'n-by I riz, 
easy like, and there he was, in the hard- 
hacks, steppin' soft, an' cockin' his head 
this way an' that, lookin' an' listenin' for 
the mouse. I jest let out a little squeak, 
an' 't would done you good to seen him 
start. 

" ' Now he's my fox/ says I, an' I once 
more dropped to my knee and waited. I 
was beginnin' to think he had scented me 
and made off, when suddenly I spied his 
left ear, one eye and the tip of his nose, 
poked around the edge of a bowlder, not 12 
feet from the muzzle of my gun. I could 
see his eye turn, as he peeked and looked 
under the edge of the rock, for the mouse. 
I brought the gun round, slow and careful, 
till I could see the white of his eye along 
the bar'l, an' let her go. 

" I riz up quick, so's to see past the 
smoke. That fox jumped clear out from 
behind the rock an' started almost straight 
for me. Then he angled off through the 
grass; passin' less'n 5 feet from where I 
stood wonderin' if he was't goin' to drop 
at the next step. When he had gone about 
15 feet and reached the top of the knoll he 
stopped, turned round and round, as you've 
seen a cat do afore she's goin' to lie down, 
an' I fairly held my breath as he cuddled 
beside an old log, and tucked his paws un- 
der him as slick as anythin' you ever seen. 
I couldn't make out that he was hurt. He 
didn't limp, an' there wa'n't no blood. 

" I heerd Sol's gun go twice, sharp an' 
quick, on the other side of the Basin ridge. 



A minute later, the dogs stopped, an' I 
knew he'd got the other fox. 

" I crep' over the ridge, an' got into a 
little run, twixt my fox an' the spruces, an' 
begun loadin'. I got the powder into the 
bar'l 'thout makin' a sound. Then I 
peeped over the ridge. The fox was there, 
an' 'peared sound asleep. 

" I pushed a wad of paper into the muz- 
zle and forced it down, an inch at a time, 
until it was home. I peeped over ag'in. 
The fox hadn't moved. Next come the 
shot, and I knew I 'd got to work shrewd 
on them, or he would hear me sure. I took 
the pouch under my jacket an' gently 
worked 20 BB's into my hand; then I 
dropped the muzzle 'most to the ground 
and let 'em run in slow, one at a time. 

" Now I looked for my game. The old 
fellow lay there, purty as a picture. Then 
I knew well 'nough he was mine. I got 
the wad down on top of the shot 'thout 
makin' any noise, an' jest laid the ramrod 
on the grass and went into my vest for a 
cap. 

" I softly raised the hammer of the old 
gun an' tucked the cap onto the nipple, 
pressed it home solid, cocked the gun full 
an' stepped to the top of the ridge, jest a 
second after Tige opened up in a thick- 
et, less'n 20 rods below, hot on my fox's 
trail. 

" I raised my gun, fully expectin' to see 
the old chap right in the air. Then I 
lowered ag'in and took a look around. 
That fox had disappeared as completely as 
though he had evaporated! 

I jumped toward the top of the ridge, 
where I could see every rod of the open 
land for more'n a quarter of a mile. There 
was no fox in sight. Down the hill I went, 
thinkin' he had possibly reached a bunch 
of spruce in the pasture; but to git my eyes 
on him I couldn't. 

" Tige sang half a dozen times an' came 
out into the clearin', right on the track. 
Before I reached the top of the hill again 
the dog was where the fox had made his 
nest. Then he gave one long-drawn ' Boo- 
00/ an' he never went another foot on that 
trail! 

" Sol came up an' I told him all about it. 
He only laughed at me. We circled the 
hill with both dogs for half an hour, but 
they never struck a track to show where 
the fox had left the top of the ridge. We 
looked everywhere for a hole or burrow, 
but there wa'n't a single break in the 
ground that we could discover. So we had 
to give it up an' leave the whole thing a 
mystery." 

The old man paused and tilted back in 
his chair, while a jovial smile played over 
his sunburned face. Lon was a man whose 
word was unimpeachable, and his listeners 
looked at one another with various expres- 



THE ASSOCIATED PIRATES. 



12 5 



sions pictured on their faces. There were 
ejaculations of surprise, but the veteran fox 
hunter calmly drew a match across his 
trousers, at a place already marked by a 
thousand brownish streaks, showing where 
he was in the habit of kindling his lucifers. 
Then he puffed a soothing whiff or 2, while 
the match slowly burned upward, until it 
scorched his fingers. 

" Yes, the mystery was solved," he 
slowly began, " but it was not until a year 
later. The following autumn Sol and I 
were ag'in on our way to the ridges, at the 
base of the mountain. Before the sun was 
fairly up the dogs started a fox near the 
same spot where Tige and Hunter struck 
the trail that mornin' I was tellin' you 
about. 

" I was in the openin' beyond where my 
fox had disappeared, when I got a shot and 
broke the fox's leg. The dogs were so 
close they run him in right away. We both 
pulled up to where they were soundin', an' 
found 'em within 3 feet of the spot where 
my fox laid down the year before. 

" They were barkin' under the end of the 



old log, close to the spot where I had last 
seen the fox. Years previous the log had 
been burned, under the end, leavin' a sort 
of canopy stickin' out. Under this was a 
woodchuck hole, around which thick grass 
was growin'. We got some sharp stakes 
and soon dug out the wounded fox. In the 
hole, close beside where he lay, was the 
skeleton of a fox. 

" My theory as to how the other one dis- 
appeared? 

"Well, I prob'ly put a shot right through 
his eyes, when I let go at him at the corner 
of the rock. He was dazed an' laid down to 
sort of think it over. He didn't stir until 
he heard the dog close onto him, an' then 
he had just life enough to try to escape. 
The animal's instinct directed him to the 
woodchuck hole. 

" Hunter and Tige knew he was dead, 
so they didn't make any more fuss about 
it." 

Then Lon lit his pipe again, and his au- 
dience pondered thoughtfully over sly rey- 
nard's sagacity, even at the moment of 
death. 



THE ASSOCIATED PIRATES. 



I. 



E. V. KEYSER. 



" Jerusalem the Golden," ejaculated the 
skipper of the " Hippocampus," gazing 
with awe at the cup modestly put forward 
by Paresis Rafferty, for his share of the 
punch. 

"Why didn't you bring a bath tub?" 
' asked the Converted Cowboy, emptying 
about half the beverage into the yawning 
receptacle. 

" Make some more, gentlemen, and don't 
kick," put in the peace-loving Microbe. 
" You have much for which to be thankful. 
It was only my strongest arguments, 
backed by the fact of my having the drop 
on him, that prevented Paresis from bring- 
ing our new 2-gallon kettle to the flowing 
bowl." 

" Well, there's not much flow to it now," 
grumbled the Hoodoo. " That fine, im- 
ported thirst of his has made it dead low 
tide; " and he thoughtfully poured what re- 
mained of the liquid into his own pint 
growler. Those left out of this deal re- 
flected that it was the Hoodoo's turn to 
wash the dishes on the morrow, so no 
shooting ensued. 

The Associated Pirates were at it again, 
and the committee of analytical chemistry 
was passing judgment on the merits of a 
new variety of spiritual refreshment, the 
joint product of the Converted Cowboy 



and Hippocamponini. Another instalment 
of punch was brewed and carefully placed 
just beyond the reach of Paresis and the 
Hoodoo; and things were going smoothly 
— especially the punch — when the wind 
veered to the South, and the presence of 
the soap factory became evident. 

" It makes me think of my dear old 
grandmother," said Grouty, wiping a tear 
from his eye and leaving a trace of smut 
on his classic nose. 

" I don't see the necessity for weeping, 
at this date," observes Paresis. " She must 
have died some time' ago, if she smells any- 
thing like that." 

" To think of that infernal bit of pollu- 
tion defacing the beauty of the Palisades! " 
wailed Hippocamponini. 

" And dynamite so cheap! " added Pare- 
sis, endeavoring, unsuccessfully, to squeeze 
another cupful of liquid from the pail. 

" You mentioned a new kettle," re- 
marked \ Hippocamponini, as the amuse- 
ment at Paresis' failure subsided; "have 
you been investing in a patent camp kit? " 

The Microbe gazed at him reproachfully. 
" I know I'm young," he admitted, " but 
not so young as that." 

" What's the matter with a patent camp 
kit," asked the Novice, waking up. 

" Nothing whatever," answered the Con- 



26 



RECREA TION. 



verted Cowboy; " it's all right; most beau- 
tiful layout you ever saw; everything from 
tin kettles of assorted sizes to cups that nest 
into each other. After seeing the collec- 
tion, in the store, for the first time, you 
will lunch at Dennett's until you've saved 
the $14.78 necessary to purchase one." 
" And then? " queried the Novice eager- 

" Then you discover that a wood fire will 
produce more or less soot, principally 
more, and while it does not particularly 
matter on the outside of the utensils, it 
raises the deuce when inside. The nesting 
process makes the transfer with accuracy 
and precision." 

" Why not use an alcohol stove, instead 
of wood? " persisted the Novice. " No 
smoke from them." 

" That's the way I figured it out, some 
years ago," said the Microbe, sadly, " and 
I made a 10-days' cruise in company with 
one. It cost me $5.63 for fuel, and the star- 
board half of my mustache, so I quit. 
Some people know when they are whipped, 
and I'm one of that variety." 

Paresis hereupon discovering his 
" Waterbury " had run down, came to the 
logical conclusion that bedtime had arrived, 
and said so; adding, as extenuation, that 
he proposed to rise early. 

An audible smile circulated, at this an- 
nouncement. Paresis' intention to rise be- 
fore dawn was a time-worn institution of 



the encampment. Time-worn, however, is 
scarcely a proper description, since it shone 
every night with the undimmed brightness 
of a lofty, if unconsummated, resolution. 
In the morning, however, it was always 
another story. 

It was not the rising orb of day, nor the 
early songs of birds, that roused Paresis 
next morning, but the Converted Cowboy's 
announcement that the Hoodoo had ex- 
pressed a desire to interview the flapjack 
reserved for the late riser. 



" Where's Paresis? " inquired the Hoo- 
doo, anxiously. Supper had disappeared 
some time before; also Paresis. 

" Been in the cabin for the last halt 
hour/' said Grouty, ridding himself of an 
intrusive caterpillar, and sinking back on 
his cushion of rock. 

" And the prescription department in 
there, too," moaned the Microbe. " Oh, 
Lord, just my luck, why didn't I take that 
drink at dinner? " 

" What's that about a drink? " asked 
Paresis, emerging from the shanty. The 
Microbe started to answer, but the remark 
was strangled at its birth, and he gazed with 
a scared expression at the questioner. 

The Converted Cowboy's glance was 
turned on Paresis, for an instant; then, 
having satisfied himself that his holster was 
hanging in the cabin, he subsided, in a heap. 



(To be continued.) 



THE WOLF QUESTION. 



ERNEST SETON THOMPSON. 



For the first time this serious question 
has received, through Recreation, a thor- 
ough and public ventilation. Hundreds of 
reports have been sent in, only a few of 
which could be printed;' and a summary of 
conclusions is now offered. 

First, the whole of the region compris- 
ing Western North Dakota, Western 
South Dakota, Wyoming, Eastern Mon- 
tana, parts of Colorado, Northern New 
Mexico and Northwestern Texas is in- 
fested with large wolves, which appear to 
be steadily increasing in numbers. 

Second, each wolf does untold damage 
to stock, each year. Most experts place 
the amount at more than $100, and the con- 
sensus of opinion is that the wolf damage 
is the heaviest of all the losses the stock 
owner has to bear. 

Third, all agree that wolves never attack 
man. 

Fourth, coyotes are a nuisance; especial- 
ly to sheep and other small stock. 



After considering the case in the light 
of practical experience and reading the 
various letters, I offer the following: 

(1.) The first step toward the extermina- 
tion of wolves is an agreement of the states 
interested for concerted, uniform, simul- 
taneous action. Isolated action has been 
tried too often already. It has invariably 
given 2 unfortunate results — the state or 
municipality in question was swamped with 
scalps taken elsewhere, and the wolves left 
the persecuting district to make things 
worse for the neighbors; but were not, by 
any means, extirpated. 

This is not, in any sense, a matter for the 
Federal Government. To apply to Wash- 
ington would be a waste of time. The 
states concerned must fight their own 
battle. 

(2.) There is only one way to extirpate 
the wolves; that is, make wolfing a profit- 
able business. Declare a good bounty and 
pay it at once. No delays, or slow notes, 



THE WOLF QUESTION, 



127 



heavily discounted, should appear in the 
matter. 

I would recommend a $10 bounty on old 
and young alike, male and female. If not 
paid on the young, the litter is usually hand 
reared, till old enough to bring the highest 
bounty. If the sexes could be distinguished 
at a distance, it would be sensible to offer 
more for a female; bu: they cannot. So 
make it even $10, all around. If there is 
absolute proof that this is more than the 
public treasury can stand, make it $5 for 
the first 2 or 3 years. Then when the 
wolves become scarcer, raise it, by steps, 
to $10. Of this, the state should pay half 
and the county half; and to make sure that 
it would be paid, I would make scalp cer- 
tificates a legal tender for taxes. 

I know this has been tried, in some parts, 
and has failed; but it was because the trial 
was local, and the municipality was 
swamped with foreign scalps. We may re- 
member here that Wales was quickly 
cleared of wolves by this method, before 
the days of guns or poisons. 

To guard against fraud, I would require 
that the entire skin of the animal be shown. 
This gives the wolfer more trouble, but the 
Government must be protected, and it 
would prevent coyotes from being passed 
as small wolves. 

The officer in charge should cancel each 
scalp by splitting it from between the eyes 
to between the ears, not by destroying it, 
or by removing any part. This would be 
an absolute and irremediable cancellation, 
yet would not impair the market value of 
the skin. We should aim to make wolfing 
as profitable as possible and the skin, di- 
vested of the head, loses largely in value. 

There should be a duly authorized per- 
son in each county to count and cancel 
scalps and issue certificates. The delays 
and expenses of going to the centre of 
government are discouraging. The county 
clerk would, perhaps, be the proper person. 

(3.) As to methods of destruction. 

Hounding is good sport and may be 
fairly successful in open country, but is 
costly. See Lieut. Edward L. Munson's 
letter in October Recreation. 

Poisoning is usually successful in new 
localities; but the wolves are now sus- 
picious of it and soon learn to avoid the 
poisonous bait. A tale oft told is that they 
know a certain plant which is an antidote, 
and that they fly to this when they feel 
themselves poisoned. This widespread no- 
tion is not without an element of truth. 
When a wolf begins to feel " bad inside " 
he swallows some grass, his usual vomit, 
and is commonly saved. There are serious 
objections to poisoning. Not only valu- 
able dogs, but range cattle, horses, and oc- 
casionally Indians have fallen victims to 
its power, Another objection that the 



professional wolfer will feel is, that one 
does not find half the wolves killed in this 
way. Mr. R. Howe's letter, in December 
number, is well worthy of study in this 
connection. 

Digging out the young is all right if you 
can locate the den; but that is largely a 
matter of chance. 

Trapping, with steel traps, is perhaps the 
surest way; and is not expensive. The 
Newhouse double spring trap, Nos. 4 and 
4^, are undoubtedly the best, and the 
makers give, with the traps, a carefully pre- 
pared pamphlet that explains in detail the 
best methods of wolf trapping. (Write the 
Oneida Community, Kenwood, N. Y.) 

But after all the professional wolfer is the 
man we must look to for a solution of the 
difficulty. All we need do is to make it 
worth his while to go seriously to work, 
and he will quickly find out, for himself, 
which methods give the best results. 

A notion has gotten abroad that Aus- 
tralia has been rid of rabbits by the intro- 
duction of a disease, and that this plan may 
also be tried on our wolves. I am sorry to 
say this is not so. All plans to extirpate 
the rabbit have failed and the Australians 
have come to accept them just as we do the 
potato bug. The only way to raise a crop, 
in rabbity Australia, is by using the rabbit 
proof wire netting and by being careful to 
kill all rabbits within its bounds. 

Science is continually surprising us; but 
I have no faith, whatever, in the disease 
solution of the wolf question. 

(4.) Coyotes are voted a nuisance, but I 
think a bounty of 50 cents, or not more 
than $1 a head, is enough to offer for them. 
One half of this should be paid by the 
state and half by the county, on presenta- 
tion of scalp only. The same methods of 
pursuit answer for coyotes and wolves. 

There is always great danger in exter- 
minating, as well as in introducing an ani- 
mal. The balance of nature is disturbed, 
and results wholly unexpected and ex- 
tremely disastrous, may follow. 

I cannot foresee any ill results from the 
extermination of the large wolves, as their 
natural food, the large game, is gone; but 
am not so sure about the coyotes. In cer- 
tain regions of the Northwest, the destruc- 
tion of the coyote has been followed by a 
plague of jack-rabbits; in Manitoba, by a 
plague of gophers or ground squirrels. 

Ranch owners should, therefore, take 
means to reduce the number of coyotes, 
rather than to wholly extirpate them. 
Stock can be saved from the remainder by 
increased care and vigilance. 

Owners of all kinds of stock would do 
well to remember that wolves and coyotes 
rarely molest animals that carry bells, and 
are shy of approaching a bunch in which 
one or 2 cowbells are jingling. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



ALASKA NOTES. 

Skaguay, Alaska. 

Editor Recreation: I am writing this 
letter in Alaska, on a winter day, yet am 
sitting in my cabin, without a coat or vest. 
The door is open and there is no fire in 
the stove. My partners, without coats, are 
finishing the last of our 3 houses for their 
families to occupy, in a few days. Such is 
life in Alaska. Only 10 miles up the trail, 
men are wading in snow to their knees; 
and 10 miles farther on, they can hardly 
find their way at all. The snow is always 
blowing so hard they cannot see 10 feet in 
front of them. This is the summit you 
hear so much about. 

I have just returned from the shore, 
where the " City of Seattle " is anchored. 
She has brought up her largest cargo of 
freight, and 150 passengers; also 100 head 
of cattle for the Dalton trail. I am almost 
sure the party who owns them will bring 
them back to this trail; for that has been 
the experience of several others. To show 
you how near some of the Eastern papers 
come to getting correct news from this 
country, I will cite a clipping my mother 
sent me, saying a Mr. Thorp, of Seattle, 
had started from that city, 3 months ago, 
with a bunch of cattle; had reached Daw- 
son City and that he had just returned with 
$180,000. The fact is Mr. Thorp left Seat- 
tle about 3 months ago, and after losing a 
large number of cattle, on the Dalton trail, 
brought what was left here. I saw him 
to-day, and he has never yet seen Dawson 
City. 

Men are busy working on the tramway, 
and I have just seen the engineer who is 
making a wagon road to the lake. He says 
it will be pushed right through. When it is 
finished, this will be the most direct route 
to the Klondike. Building is still going 
on, at a most astonishing rate, and would 
even be greater if there was more lumber 
here. The Canadian mounted police have 
had almost all their outfit packed over to 
the lake. It cost them about 60 cents a 
pound. 

We are arranging with a gentleman in 
Seattle to furnish guides to the lakes, and 
have a dozen other irons in the fire. I am 
unable to say now if I will go in, in' the 
early spring, or not. At present I am tied 
up here, and could not get away without 
losing- money. Am on the ground floor 
here, but am anxious to get into the gold 
district among the first, as everyone who 
comes out brings plenty of gold. They all 
tell the same story — plenty of gold and lit- 
tle grub. 

There is a Mr. Acker here, who has been 
on the Yukon 8 years, hunting and trap- 
ping. His wife has been with him all this 



time. She dresses in men's clothes, and 
hunts as well as he does. She has gone 
East now, but may come out later on. 
Next spring he is going in for gold. Mr. 
Acker, like everyone else, sounds the 
praises of the 30-30 rifle. I have a 30-30 
Marlin and some 6 grain cartridges, for 
small game and target practice. 

I have not had a chance to hunt big 
game yet, though I have been out several 
times, for a day. There are plenty of 
goats, porcupines, and bears within a few 
miles. There are a number of bears feed- 
ing on the dead horses, all along the trail. 
Have seen several bear skins brought in. 
Have also seen plenty of goat skins, and 
we have all the fish we want, here. Trout 
and salmon can be shot or speared, in 
nearly all the streams. Moose, caribou and 
wolves are plentiful along the Yukon. 

Our newsdealers sold 12 copies of No- 
vember Recreation in a few hours, at 2 
bits a copy. I always have a copy on my 
counter, in my rifle gallery. 

Harry L. Suydam. 



CAN A STATE DISCRIMINATE AGAINST NON- 
RESIDENTS ? 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Editor Recreation: As the Constitution 
of the United States guarantees to each 
and every one of its citizens equal rights in 
all the states, how can a state pass and en- 
force a law which discriminates against the 
citizens of other states? For instance, a 
state passes a law prohibiting citizens of 
other states from hunting or fishing there- 
in. Or, a state passes a law licensing a 
resident to hunt, on paying a specified 
license fee, and for the same privilege non- 
residents are required to pay 50 times as 
much. 

If you think proper to answer the fore- 
going, through the columns of the king of 
sportsmen's journals, Recreation, I shall 
be pleased to have you do so. 

C. H. Trotter. 

I referred this question to the Hon. John 
S. Wise, 44 Broad St., New York, one of 
the best authorities in the United States on 
game and fish laws, who submits the fol- 
lowing opinion: 

No one has any property in game, until 
game is captured (2 Kent, 416 et seq.). 

To hunt and kill game is a privilege 
granted by the state. The ownership, as 
well as the right to destroy game, is held 
by the sovereign authority of the state, in 
trust for all the people of the state. The 
question of individual enjoyment is one of 
public policy, and not of private right 
(Manger v. People, 97 111. 320). 



128 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



129 



The Constitution of the United States 
does not prohibit the enactment of game 
laws (Phelps v. Racey, 60 N. Y., 10; State 
v. Randolph, 1 Mo. Appeals, 15; Boonham 
v. Webster, 5 Mass., 266; Gentile v. State, 
29 Ind., 409; State v. Norton, 45 Vermont, 
258). 

A state, having allowed game to be killed 
within its limits, cannot prohibit its trans- 
portation beyond (Bowman v. Chicago, 
etc., R.R. Co., 125 U. S., 465); .but that 
does not prevent it from declaring what 
persons may have a right to take that 
which belongs to it. The state holds the 
ownership of game in trust for all the peo- 
ple of the state, but not in trust for all the 
people of the United States. This trust 
existed before the United States was 
formed, and there is nothing in the Con- 
stitution compelling one state to allow citi- 
zens of other states to enter its limits, kill 
its game, and transport it. 

In Brown v. Maryland, 12 Wheaton, 419, 
it was held that while a state cannot pro- 
hibit the transportation of legitimate arti- 
cles of commerce into or through its ter- 
ritory, it may, under its police power, 
regulate the sale of such commodities 
within its own limits. This being so a 
state surely has a right to confine the kill- 
ing of game, in which nobody has a private 
right, within its own limits. While the en- 
joyment of certain rights, privileges and 
immunities, secured by the Constitution of 
the United States, is guaranteed by the 
Constitution to all citizens of the United 
States, in all the states, the comity between 
the states, so far as it concerns rights and 
privileges and immunities not so guaran- 
teed, must yield to the laws and policy of 
the state in which it is sought to be in- 
voked. 

The Constitutional provision above re- 
ferred to was held not to extend to the 
enjoyment, by a non-resident, of the right 
to share in the common property of citi- 
zens of a state. In McCready v. Virginia, 
94 U. S., 391, the Supreme Court upheld 
Virginia's right to confine the right of fish- 
ing in the navigable waters of the state to 
her own citizens. The argument in that 
case, its reasoning, and its conclusions, are 
equally applicable to the question of power 
in a state to confine the right of pursuing 
game within her borders, to her own citi- 
zens. John S. Wise. 



MAINE GAME NOTES. 

On December 1st, close time began on 
moose. The year's crop of moose has been 
small; not because moose were few, but 
because few were killed. This was due 
mainly to the change in the game laws, 
enacted by the last legislature. The open 
season did not begin until October 15th, 15 
days later than ever before. By that time 
the calling season was nearly or quite past. 



Experienced guides remarked early in the 
season that all the moose killed this year 
would be secured by accident. The knowl- 
edge of that fact kept many hunters from 
coming to this region. Many who usually 
come to Maine for moose, went to the 
provinces, where hunting is reported good. 
This even affected the late summer vis- 
itors; who would have remained on the 
ground ready to take the first opportunity 
to hunt the moose, had the law remained 
as it was. 

The game that escaped the hunter will 
probably go to feed the lumbermen scat- 
tered over the hunting region. I am told 
that it is a regular winter work to hunt for 
the camps, and that deer are sold at the 
established price of 4 £ents a pound. 
Moose suffer to a certain extent also. 

It is claimed that the change to October 
15, was not intentional, but due to a cler- 
ical error. If such was the case, the law 
will probably be changed at the next ses- 
sion of the legislature, a year from now. 
Maine legislators have done fairly well in 
making laws to protect her citizens, but 
not so well when they legislate in behalf of 
her wild animals. 

An article has gone the rounds of the 
papers, urging that each hunter be re- 
stricted to one instead of 2 deer a year. 
The plea is on the ground that the present 
law will permit the extermination of deer. 
It is estimated that there are now 150,000 
deer in the woods of Maine. Suppose 50,- 
000 of them are does, old enough to bear 
young. The destruction of young, by foxes 
and in other ways, will be something; but 
many of the does will bear twins. So we 
will let this figure remain. 

Probably 3,000 deer have been brought 
out of the woods by the railroads and other 
public conveyances. Not over 1-3 of these 
were killed by men who had had more than 
one deer. So that the proposed law would 
not have saved more than 1,000 this year. 
It would also have saved some deer from 
being killed by those who live on the bor- 
ders of the forest. Another estimate puts 
the number of deer killed each year at 
10,000. If this is anywhere near the truth, 
the deer are increasing at the rate of 25,000 
to 40,000 a year. And that is after making 
large deductions for a shrinkage of which 
we know nothing. So that the one deer 
limit does not seem to be called for, at 
present. 

There may be a necessity of better means 
of enforcing the law now on the statute 
book. 

Several visits to the woods lead me to 
think that the game laws are as well en- 
forced now as could reasonably be ex- 
pected. Several features of the game laws 
are unsatisfactory; and an effort will be 
made to change them when the next legis- 
lature meets. 

I'll give it up! I mean the 30 calibre 



130 



RECREATION. 



question. I could not believe that so small 
a bullet could have immediate killing pow- 
er. Finally, I ordered a box magazine 
Winchester, carrying the new army cart- 
ridge, with soft nosed bullet. The argu- 
ment of the first shot with it was a knock 
down one. It knocked down the deer in the 
most approved fashion. Subsequent trials 
have fully confirmed the first impression. 
Now, I would not exchange it for a dozen 
of any other make or cartridge. The 30-40- 
220 cartridge is equal to any emergency. 
Its action is the simplest and surest I have 
yet tried. 

Box Magazine, Dover, Me. 



ANOTHER REMARKABLE SHOT. 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Editor Recreation: Reading of Gov- 
ernor Richards' " Remarkable Shot," re- 
minds me of one I made about 15 years 
ago, in Colorado. Some years ago I told 
about taking a shot at a wild goose, in her 
nest in the top of a cottonwood tree, on 
the Big Horn river, to a party of friends, 
one of whom is an authority on birds. He 
said that goose must have been trying to 
keep up her reputation for being " as silly 
as a goose " ; that she had stolen an owl's 
nest, etc. I never got to finish the story, 
but told the fellows if they would learn of 
the peculiar habits of the goose they must 
get out in the country and see for them- 
selves. Since that I have been careful 
about the crowd when telling of remark- 
able happenings. 

But about the shot. I had located on a 
cow ranch, on the plains Northeast of Den- 
ver, and had written home, to Pennsyl- 
vania, of the great antelope hunting to be 
had there. My brother, then a boy, paid 
me a visit, and the next day after his ar- 
rival said I must show him how I could 
shoot. So, in the morning we saddled up 
and rode, in a walk, for his sake, about a 
mile, when we sighted a buck antelope. 
He was out on a flat, about Y\ of a mile 
away. He saw us first and trotted off. He 
ran about half way to the top of a knoll 
and stopped, about 600 or 800 yards away. 
I knew the next time he would stop 
would be on another knoll perhaps a mile 
away, and that if I was going to shoot I 
must shoot at once. I put up the sights to 
what I judged would be the right elevation 
and blazed away. I took down the rifle 
and looked for the bullet to strike. My 
brother said, 

' You missed him," and I saw a cloud 
of dust rise about 30 feet this side of the 
antelope. At the same instant the antelope 
dropped, and lay without a struggle. 

I thought the bullet had ricocheted from 
the ground and had hit him in the head. 

We went up and examined the carcass 
but could not find any mark of a bullet. 



Thinking it would show up when we 
skinned him we took him home, head, legs 
and all. There we stripped him, from 
hoofs to horns, but not a bullet hole could 
we find. Nor was there one, either in car- 
cass or hide. ' 

That was a most remarkable shot. I 
missed the antelope, entirely, but killed 
him all the same. How did it happen? 

I may add that the most remarkable 
thing about this story is it is strictly true. 

J. Frank Warner. 

The antelope probably saw the bullet 
coming; caught it in his mouth, swallowed 
it and died of appendicitis. — Editor. 



SHALL WE KILL GAME FOR OUR FRIENDS? 

Cincinnati, O. 

My dear Coquina: I send you by ex- 
press, for your collection of curios, what I 
believe to be the largest and heaviest rifle 
in this country — possibly as large a one as 
was ever made for sporting purposes. It 
was made for the Prince of Wales, when 
he came here, and he used it for hunting 
buffalo, in the Southwest. He gave it to 
his guide, Cass Adams, who had been de- 
tailed for that purpose by the Secretary of 
War. Adams subsequently sold the rifle 
to Kit Carson, who owned it until his 
death. You may handle it with impunity, 
and without fear or danger; though I 
frankly confess that while reading Rec- 
reation, last night, and the beautiful 
roasting you give me, in it, I felt much in- 
clined to set my inventive wheels going 
and to attach some mechanical device to 
the gun whereby it would go off, with an 
awful roar, just about the time it reached 
you; thereby causing those few remaining 
hairs on your much abused scalp to stand 
on end even straighter than on the well 
remembered occasion when you fell over 
the sleeping grizzly. 

What's that? you're not bald headed? 
Come off old man! 'Fess up! I am; and 
let's see, it's — gee! it's almost 2 decades 
since we used to throw bouquets at each 
other, through one of your contempora- 
ries; you from the icy peaks and frozen 
fields of the farthest North, and I as " M. 
I. Grant " from the sunny slopes and alkali 
plains of Mexico. We may have been en- 
vious of each other, but we were supremely 
happy in youth and good health. 

Do you know that when memory carries 
me back to those halcyon days, bringing 
with them fond recollections of our mutual 
friends, all the anger and soreness, because 
of your undeserved lambasting, leaves me; 
and I feel more like ordering up 'nother 
cold one, as in those good old days which 
can never come again, than like replying to 
you. Through the clouds of smoke that 
are pleasuring me and filling my bachelor 
quarters I can again see your familiar face, 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



131 



presiding as of old at the festal feast which 
followed the annual shoot, and surround- 
ing the groaning table so many clever fel- 
lows who, when old Father Time called 
them to the happy hunting ground, gamely 
as ever, bracing themselves as of old, sang 
out, in the cheery well remembered tones, 
" Ready— Pull." 

No Pard! not to-night. Can't do it. 
Pass me up. Am not in the mood, now, to 
get back at you in our old style. How- 
ever I do claim the right to wiggle out of 
the stinking sty into which you so uncere- 
moniously jabbed me; and when out will 
wager a big red apple you will be the first 
man to furnish soap and towel to clean off 
the excrement. 

The time was, and not so long ago, 
when 6 guns, handled by such experts as 
Judge Ellis B. Gregg, Cass Hoppel, Geo. 
Given and Harry Rowe (who are generally 
known by their trap names of Murphy and 
Dick), Pop Schatzman and I might have 
bagged a full 300 ducks in more than a 
week, after having travelled more than 600 
miles for that purpose, without exposing 
ourselves to such skinning as you gave me. 

Let me 'fess up. Whenever the time 
comes when I can't get at least 50 ducks 
in a week (certainly none too many for a 
dinner, with a few left for superannuated 
sportsmen, a brace or 2 for the old, gray 
headed mother, and, not to forget the fair 
friend who can serve them so daintily, 
then I'll pack up the little hammerless and 
ship it on to you, to be placed alongside 
of the big rifle now sent for your curiosity 
shop. Indeed to be honest I have been in 
the seventh heaven all the past week, pre- 
paring for my annual quail shoot; derive 
ing nearly as much pleasure from the 
anticipation, as I probably shall from the 
realization. If I fail to kill a full hundred 
between Wednesday a.m. and Saturday 
night, it will be because the old Gordon, 
or my fast stiffening joints don't hold out. 
So you can prepare another roast for me. 
But of that more anon. 

Chas. L. Lundy. 

ANSWER. 

My dear Mr. Lundy: I thoroughly ap- 
preciate your kindness in sending me the 
big rifle. It is a veritable curiosity and 
adds greatly to the interest of my collec- 
tion. This seems a little like heaping coals 
of fire on my bald head. However, if you 
will again read my reply to your letter, on 
page 385 t>f November Recreation, you 
will agree with me that I did not roast you, 
in any sense of the word. I discussed, in 
as mild and dignified a manner as I am 
capable of, the question you raised regard- 
ing the propriety of killing game to give 
away to friends. Of course, I realize this 
is an almost universal custom, among big 
hearted sportsmen (and all sportsmen have 
big hearts); yet all the same it is wrong. 



Primarily we all like the fun of killing the 
game, and when we get it, we experience 
another pleasure in giving it to our friends 
who are less fortunate than we. Still, as I 
have said, we must quit this, or in 10 years 
none of us will be able to kill game enough 
to make a meal for ourselves, at the camp- 
fire. 

You agree with me in this, in spirit, and 
I want you to be one of the charter mem- 
bers of the L. A. S., which is to be organ- 
ized here in January, and which is to take 
up vigorously, the work of game protection 
all over the land. — Editor. 



A GRIZZLY BY MOONLIGHT. 

% Glen Ellen, Cal. 

In i860, on my way from Arizona, where 
I had been prospecting, I arrived at Los 
Angeles. The stage " Old Senator," had 
just left for' San Francisco. Rather than 
remain there for 2 weeks, for her next trip, N 
I sold my worn-out horse, and purchased 
another, to finish my journey to San Fran- 
cisco. 

On arrival at Fort Tejon, I laid over for 
a few days, to go hunting. In those days 
the grizzlies were numerous in that locality, 
and as there was much bear talk about the 
Station I concluded to try to kill „£>ne. I 
had a splendid gun for that purpose — a 
Sharps, using J^-ounce round balls, slugs 
of one ounce, and others of V/z ounce. 
(Sometimes I think some of the latter are 
going yet, it shot so far and strong.) 

While out hunting, the day after my ar- 
rival at the station, I saw a large bear track 
on the trail, and decided to go out that 
night. I selected a tree to climb, if neces- 
sary. This was about 30 yards from the 
trail. 

It was a clear, moonlight night. About 
9 o'clock I reached my tree and patiently 
waited till one o'clock. I was beginning 
to feel tired and sleepy, and had about de- 
cided to give it up, when his majesty ap- 
peared, quietly walking along the trail. 

I thought: " Suppose I don't hit to kill; 
and he kills me! In what will I be the 
gainer? " I am an old hunter, commenc- 
ing in Texas over 50 years ago, and prefer 
the chances in my favor. I had never 
hunted grizzlies, because all my former 
rifles were of the "old Kentucky" kind; 
good for deer and " Injuns " but poor for 
bear. 

The bear moved along quietly till about 
80 yards from me, and then turned broad- 
side and looked directly toward me. I took 
deliberate aim and pulled, quickly reload- 
ing. The bear sprang forward, then turned 
around short and bit at his side, and then 
ran down the hill. I could hear the Man- 
zanita bushes break as he rushed through 
them. After waiting a short time I made 
tracks for the station. The next day I told 



132 



RECREA TION. 



the boys I had shot a bear, so they decided 
to take the dogs and trail him. I took 
them to the spot, and the dogs trailed 
down the mountain for nearly half a mile, 
where the bear lay, dead. We skinned him, 
and an examination showed the bullet had 
gone through his heart. 

I have known of other cases where bear 
have lived long enough to do great dam- 
age after having been shot through the 
heart. Wm. H. Hilton. 



WINTER DAYS IN FLORIDA. 

After considerable correspondence with 
sportsmen in the best game sections of the 
United States, we concluded the West 
coast of Florida must be an ideal spot, so 
decided to go below the frost line. With 
that end in view we wrote to J. L. Sandlin, 
of Punta Gorda, on Charlotte Harbor. Mr. 
Sandlin, a whole-souled sportsman, wrote 
us we could have good sport with quails, 
snipe, plover, turkeys, and deer, with no 
danger in winter from snakes. My wife, 
whom we called " The Princess," decided 
to accompany me. Saturday, January 30, 
found us at the Punta Gorda hotel, the 
front veranda of which looks out over 
Charlotte Harbor. 

The waters of the bay teem with fish. 
You can stand on the pier and catch them 
to your heart's content, while down the 
bay there is the finest of tarpon fishing. 

We left the hotel early Saturday after- 
noon. The Princess and I went in a one- 
horse buggy, minus top and dash-board; 
Mr. Sandlin and the guide following in a 
wagon loaded with 2 tents, provisions, etc. 
We crossed Alligator creek and took an 
Easterly direction toward Fish-eating 
creek, about 20 miles West of Lake Okee- 
chobee. We had made 20 miles by 7 p.m., 
and the guide pointed out a clump of cab- 
bage palmetto trees, where we were to 
pitch our tent for the night. Business cares 
and the world were left far behind. We 
soon had a large camp fire blazing and the 
tents up. 

The Princess was to have her first ex- 
perience in camp life, and well did she ac- 
quit herself. She did not utter a protest 
or a complaint, no difference how hard it 
rained or how long our journey. 

Nine o'clock in the morning saw us on 
our way again. All day we travelled over 
a beautiful prairie, such as is found in the 
West, only this country is covered with 
palmetto, with large groves of pine-trees 
scattered about (they are called " pine isl- 
ands "). 

It grew dark, but still the solitary tree 
that had been pointed out as near where 
we would camp seemed as far away as it 
had an hour before. There was no trail or 
road now, and the guide seemed a little 
confused. We followed blindly in the 
darkness, frightening the many strange 



birds that abound near the creeks. As they 
flew away, with their discordant cries, a 
queer sensation came over me, for I could 
but realize we were in a wilderness, 60 
miles from the nearest town. 

We reached the tree at last, and pitched 
our tent in a small grove of live oaks, hung 
with festoons of Spanish moss. Next 
morning we were eager for sport. Clate 
saddled a horse for The Princess, but there 
was no side-saddle, and her face was a 
study as she looked at the cowboy's saddle. 
On this she rode 3 days after deer, travel- 
ling about 15 miles each day, over the 
beautiful, flower decked prairies. 

We were not more than a mile from 
camp, on the first day, when the dog 
struck a fresh trail. We at once began a 
slow, crooked walk, the dog with his nose 
to the ground, picking out the trail from 
among the tracks of probably 20 others 
that crossed and recrossed it. After a walk 
of perhaps a mile, the trail led to a palmet- 
to thicket. When within 20 steps, a beau- 
tiful doe jumped from the brush and 
started across the prairie. I had the best 
position and got 2 shots with my Win- 
chester shotgun. The last took effect, and 
blood was found on the palmetto leaves. 

The doe ran nearly a mile, stopped, 
looked at us for a minute, turned and 
walked off. Clate, following, found her 
dead, some distance away. 

Every day was a repetition of the first. 
In the afternoon we killed 6 wild turkeys 
within a mile or so of camp. We could 
easily find 10 to 12 coveys of quails in a 
day, and could kill from 40 to 60 birds to 
the gun. The shores of the small lakes and 
ponds were covered with plover and jack- 
snipe. Every pond had from 2 to 50 white- 
plumed birds, egrets and cranes. The 
Princess shot a sVa pound Francotte gun, 
and could kill her birds as clean as we 
with our heavier guns. 

Of course you can get more and better 
deer shooting in Routt county, Colorado, 
than in Florida; but for all-around sport, at 
a time when Ohio weather is at its worst, 
the Southern part of Florida excels. We 
expect to make the trip again. 

The great trouble with many sportsmen 
is, they start to Florida without any par- 
ticular objective point, then travel around 
looking here and there for good shooting. 
Not finding it, they become disgusted, or 
their vacation expires, and they return 
home without the sport. My advice to all 
is to visit Punta Gorda, and then with tent 
and guide to leave the town, as quickly as 
possible, for camp. Nimrod. 



HOW TO OUTFIT FOR THE KLONDYKE. 

Skaguay, Alaska. 

Editor Recreation: I went into a news- 
stand to buy something with which to 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



*33 



while away the long winter nights (we now 
see the sun only one hour a day) and the 
first thing that met my eye was a copy of 
Recreation. Being an old and enthusi- 
astic sportsman I of course bought it, and 
found great pleasure in reading it. In this 
number (October) you say you are having 
many inquiries as to the best way to go to 
the mines, and the articles necessary for a 
year's outfit, for one man. 

I am an old California miner, and have 
also mined in Alaska. Am now wintering 
here, on my way back to the mines. Per- 
haps I can give your readers a few points 
that will be useful and interesting. In the 
first place a man should take nothing that 
is not absolutely necessary; for interior 
Alaska is utterly destitute of transportation 
facilities. When you leave the water, every- 
thing must be packed on your back, and 
there are no trails nor roads. The flats and 
bottoms are generally very brushy and 
are covered with moss, from 6 inches to 
a foot deep. Articles of necessity for 
a year's supply are: 400 pounds flour; 
100 pounds beans; 100 pounds bacon; 
100 pounds sugar; 50 pounds rice; 100 
pounds dried fruits; 25 pounds coffee; 5 
pounds tea; one pound pepper; 10 pounds 
salt; one dozen cans yeast powder; all wool 
blankets 30 pounds; one good mackinaw 
suit; 2 extra heavy undershirts; 2 extra 
heavy overshirts, and drawers to match; 
one suit ordinary woollen goods, for sum- 
mer; 2 suits medium weight underwear; 
one cap; 2 pairs good Yukon shoes, with 
nails; 2 pairs good rubber boots; 1 pair 
felt boots and overshoes; J /2 dozen heavy 
socks; J /i dozen medium socks; one tent; 
one Yukon stove; one hatchet; one axe; 10 
pounds nails; one whip saw, oakum and 
pitch, for making boat. 

I have seen kundreds of men coming to 
Alaska, loaded down with things that were 
absolutely useless, and that had to be 
thrown away; but of all the useless things 
lugged into Alaska, a 6 shooter and a big 
belt, filled with cartridges, are the most 
common and the most useless. The Indians 
are perfectly harmless, and there are no 
dangerous wild animals. A wolf is an ar- 
rant coward and a bear will never fight 
unless badly wounded, or unless she has 
very young cubs and you come on her 
suddenly. But of all the cowardly wild ani- 
mals that roam the forests the cougar (or 
California lion), whose unearthly scream 
sends the cold chills down the back of the 
tenderfoot, stands at the head; and I do 
not even except the deer. 

In the country bordering on Juneau and 
Sitka there are thousands of deer and 
grouse. Last year I was 400 miles North- 
west of Circle City; but found no deer, and 
nothing in the way of game except moose, 
mountain sheep and a few grouse and ptar- 
migan. On all the tributaries of the Cop- 
per, Kenai, Shushitna and Yukon may be 



found moose and sheep; but no deer. 
Along the coast of Alaska there are thou- 
sands of arms and inlets and all of them 
are swarming with salmon, cod, halibut 
and, in fact, with all kinds of salt water 
fishes. In the interior of Alaska are thou- 
sands of rivers, creeks and lakes, and all 
are literally alive with trout, from the beau- 
tiful Dolly Varden, 2 feet long, down to the 
common brook trout, 6 inches long. 

From San Francisco to Dawson, via 
St. Michaels, is nearly 5,000 miles; and 
the journey consumes the best part of 
the season. Over the Dalton trail the dis- 
tance is 600 miles, and a rough mountain 
trail. Over the Stickeen river route but 
few have travelled. The distance, over the 
pass, to head of water navigation, is 320 
miles and the trail very boggy and hard to 
travel. Over the Skaguay and Dyea trails 
the distance is 30 and 40 miles respectively, 
to head of the Yukon. Over the Dyea a 
tramway is being built, and over the Skag- 
uay, or White trail, both a tramway and 
a good wagon road are being rapidly 
pushed to completion. They will be open 
for the spring travel and are only 4 miles 
apart. These are really the only routes 
worth speaking of, into the Yukon. I shall 
go over in March, as I consider that the 
best time to start. On the lakes the ther- 
mometer is now (November 25th) about 30 
below zero. 

J. W. Reese. 



WING SHOOTING. 

Editor Recreation: From time to time 
we see methods of wing shooting dis- 
cussed. Charles Lancaster, in his new 
book, goes into the most minute details, 
with explanatory cuts and diagrams, and 
theoretically explains the whole business. 

They who have tried know how hard it 
is to reduce theory to practice. No 2 per- 
sons aim or shoot alike. Intuition is the 
main factor. A few are born shooters. 
For those who are not, there is no royal 
road to proficiency. With a natural love 
for hunting, persistent practice will bring 
reasonable success. I do not mean to dis- 
courage the beginner, when I say that I, 
who have grown gray in the shooting 
business, and used more ammunition than 
most men see in a lifetime — am well satis- 
fied if, in a day of upland shooting, I aver- 
age 60 per cent. I have many times hunted 
with the " never miss 'em " kind of gun- 
ners, and invariably these invincibles 
" never had such beastly luck," and were 
continually forgetting the safety, etc., etc. 
No set rules can be given. In a day's real 
shooting, so many different conditions 
arise, and with so little time for anything 
but a snap shot, that " book larnin' " is 
useless. Keep shooting! Keep shooting! 
Don't let a bad miss, nor a dozen of them, 
discourage you a bit. Keep your temper. 



134 



RECREA TION. 



When you make a difficult kill, call it a 
"scratch" shot; and never try to explain 
to a companion how you missed that 
" straight away." Any one who is con- 
stantly grieved, because he don't kill every- 
thing in sight, is a game hog, whether he 
wears English corduroy or overalls. If 
you find no real pleasure afield, unless a big 
bag is secured, no amount of practice will 
make you a real sportsman, or an agree- 
able companion for one. In conclusion, I 
propose to give away the entire secret of 
successful shooting; of course, you must 
not tell anyone. " If at first you don't suc- 
ceed, try, try again." Let trap shooting 
alone, as a help for field work. Quail shoot- 
ing, I think, is the most difficult of all 
upland shooting; and I advise beginners to 
tackle Bob White, and keep banging away 
at the hard as well as at the easy rises. 
Use a light " open " gun, and a good stiff 
load. A woodcock load won't do for quail. 
When I say "open" I mean cylinder; 
don't be persuaded to buy a choke bored 
gun, nor a cheap one. If you can master 
a straight stock, all the better. Too long 
a stock is an error; a short one can be 
handled more quickly. The drop, hang or 
balance of a gun, is not so important as 
many think. Bear in mind that practice 
only will bring proficiency. 

" Pull," Marion, Ind. 



SHOOTING AT MOVING OBJECTS. 

How to shoot game on the run, is what 
Homer Raleigh, of East Oakland, Cal., 
wishes to know. 

Having lived in the Rockies a good 
many years, at a time (28 years ago) when 
a gun was a man's best friend, and con- 
stant companion, I will venture to give 
Mr. H. R. a pointer or two. 

The first, and most essential thing in 
shooting at moving objects, is to be able 
to keep the sights and eye in perfect align- 
ment, while the muzzle of the gun is being 
moved in every direction necessary. That 
can be learned in a short time, at home, by 
practice. Hold the gun hard and solidly 
against the shoulder, with the left hand 
well extended. Catch the sights, then don't 
change the relative position of the head, 
shoulder and gun, in following the game, 
but swing the whole upper part of the 
body. After practising this for a while, 
you will find that you can roll your eyes to 
locate the game, and when the gun catches 
up with the object, and you look for the 
sights, they will be in line. 

The right hand should be depended on 
only to steady the gun, and press the 
trigger. Then it will be free to operate 
the lever in repeating guns, which will 
give you shot after shot without taking the 
gun from the shoulder. After you can do 
this well, get someone to roll a barrel head, 



down a gentle slope. Its motion will be 
much like that of a running deer. Try at 
first at 50 yards, and as you improve in- 
crease the distance. You will soon learn 
how far ahead of a moving object it is 
necessary to hold. 

This combination, with a level head, and 
steady nerve, will be hard for game to beat. 
N. E. R., Scranton, Pa. 



In answer to Homer Raleigh, E. Oak- 
land, Cal., will say: First learn to use your 
rifle, as you would a shot gun; that is, to 
shoot it with both eyes open. Learn to see 
the sights, and the object, with your right 
eye, if you are right handed; and with your 
left eye, if you are left handed. Be sure and 
see the object with the opposite eye. When 
you can do this, take a~ piece of cardboard 
about 2 inches square. Make a hole in it 
to fit the muzzle of your gun tightly, and 
to come y 2 inch above the front sight. 
Shove this up against the front sight. Then 
using a stationary target, look at sights 
with one eye and target with the other. 
You will find the result as good as if no 
paper was on your gun. 

Then get a friend to throw a tomato can, 
12 to 15 feet high, and 8 or 10 feet from 
muzzle of gun. Pull a coarse sight, just as 
the can starts down, and you will hit it 99 
times out of 100. When able to do this 
fairly well, get the round top of a lard 
bucket, or something similar, and have 
some one roll it past you, about 20 feet 
from you. Sight just ahead, and you will 
find results good. 

By such practice, you can do as good 
work with rifle as with a shotgun. 

F. M. H. 



Wormleysburg, Pa. 

Editor Recreation: Seeing a request 
from Homer Raleigh, in November Rec- 
reation, for some one to give pointers on 
how to shoot with rifle, on the run, I will 
offer a few suggestions. While I don't 
claim to be an expert, I find no trouble in 
knocking over a rabbit or a fox, on the 
run, and can often kill small birds, such as 
snipe, kingfishers, etc., on the wing. Have 
broken 5 out of 6 one ounce vials, swung 
on a 10 foot string, like the pendulum of a 
clock, distance 10 steps, with a revolver. 

The best method I know, for a beginner, 
is to take a small cheese box, paint a 2 inch 
centre, with some bright color, and get a 
friend to roll it down a hill. Stand away 
about 20 or 30 paces, at right angles, for 
side or cross shots, and see how many bul- 
lets you can put through the box before it 
reaches the foot of the hill. The first 
lesson should be in a smooth sod field. 
After you can hit the box nearly every time 
go to a corn field, or tobacco patch, where 
there are rows or hills thrown up, and you 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



*35 



will get on to the jumping act of deer, by 
the box bouncing up over the rows or hills. 
For a driving shot walk through a corn 
field where there are field pumpkins. 
When you get to a hilltop kick a good 
sized pumpkin down the hill. Get your 
repeater ready- and try to plug the pump- 
kin. Don't be in too much of a hurry, and 
you will be surprised at your success. 

E. J. D. 



For a number of years I have been a 
close reader and hearty advocate of Rec- 
reation; and have gained many useful 
hints, and read many pleasant articles in its 
columns. 

It was in it I first saw the advertisement 
of the Forehand Arms Co., and through it 
I was enabled to secure one of the best 
trap and field guns in America. It cer- 
tainly surpasses any gun I have used, for 
close and hard shooting at long range. 

In October Recreation I noticed an 
article by Donnel, Springfield, 111., on 
" How to Learn." This article gives what 
I consider the best method of learning 
wing-shooting. For 2 years I have been 
using that method, with a few slight varia- 
tions. I have added to Donnel's method, 
the practice of shooting at light, loosely 
wrapped paper balls, thrown in the air; 
and have found it of great service in teach- 
ing one to cover flying objects quickly. 

In this vicinity there is little field sport; 
the game having been almost exterminated 
by hogs and pot hunters. However, South 
Carolina, especially Beaufort county, offers' 
a vast field of sport to the true sportsman. 
The hogs and pot hunters have no show in 
that country. The land owners are careful 
as to whom they give permits. The Georgia 
legislature 2 years ago passed laws restrict- 
ing the shooting of game; and the increase 
of quail here is already noticeable. In a 
few years more Chatham county will have 
regained her former prestige as a sports- 
man's paradise. 

James S. Estill, Savannah, Ga. 



TRAPPING BEARS. 

Albion, Mich. 

Editor Recreation: In April, 1895, my 
old time friend Baker, and I, packed our 
traps and camp equipage and started for 
the wilds of Northern Wisconsin, after 
bear. We located between the East and 
West branches of the Sturgeon river. 

We soon got our traps out and caught 
our first bear on the second day of May. 
The next one was a yearling. We caught it 
near camp, and the old she bear made 
such a noise, that night, the boys stayed 
close to the fire. The next morning I 
found a large bear in a trap about 3 
miles' below; and the way he had eaten 
off trees and logs, and torn up the ground, 



would have surprised you. He had taken 
the trap and clog and had climbed up some 
trees nearly to the top; had broken and 
torn off the limbs until the trees looked as 
if some one had started a clearing there. 

When I came in sight he was hung up 
under a big log. I raised my gun to shoot 
him, when he flew for a big tree. When he 
got up about 40 feet he stopped, and at the 
crack of my repeater he dropped. 

He was caught by the hind foot, and had 
a hard maple clog, about 12 feet long, at- 
tached to the trap. He had made a des- 
perate effort but could not get away. 

One night when Mr. Baker came to 
camp I asked what luck? He said, 

" I have a barrel of bear, and a cinna- 
mon at that. He is about like the silver 
tip you got the other day " (referring to a 
badger I had caught). " But this is a bear. 
She was caught by 3 feet, and I found a 
barrel, at a camp; took the trap off her 
and fastened her in the barrel." 

We went after her and brought her 4 
miles, to camp. She was a yearling bear 
and had no trap on then. To get a chain on 
her was the next thing. After trying several 
experiments I finally caught her by the 
ears and held her until Mr. Baker fastened 
the chain on her and fastened her to a pole 
close to our camp. It needed a third man, 
with a kodak, to show the scene properly. 

We caught 7 bears and one wolf that 
spring, and hope to do better next time. If 
any reader of Recreation knows of a lo- 
cation where bear are plenty we would like 
to correspond with him. Recreation is 
the best sportsmen's journal published. 

Wm. Dicer. 



GAME IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

The Eastern part of North Carolina is 
being more favored than formerly by 
devotees of the gun. This country is the 
tide water section of the state. A level ter- 
ritory, from 2 to 10 feet above tide water, 
and intersected by numerous sounds, rivers 
and creeks. Around these bays and rivers 
are miles of waste land; in some places 
open, in others, covered with a dense 
growth of gum, cypress, juniper, etc. 
Possibly 10 per cent, of the land is under 
cultivation. On the waterways thousands 
of swans, geese, brant, and wild fowl, of 
every variety, are to be found feeding on 
the shallow, grassy bottoms. The nearer 
the coast the greater the numbers. On the 
narrow strip of beach between sound and 
ocean, good shooting, at shore birds, can 
always be had. Coming inland, snipe and 
woodcock are found; but there is so much 
territory suitable for them, that good bags 
are not often obtained. Deer, bears, coons, 
foxes and squirrels, are here. Deer are 
yet quite plentiful, but not increasing, ow- 
ing to loose game laws. There are bears 
in the heavy swamp, but it is extremely 



136 



RECREA TION. 



difficult to hunt them. Those who come to 
this section for them, will be disappointed. 
Of the smaller fur bearing game there is 
an abundance. Quails and turkeys are 
found. Their territory extends into the 
low swampy regions. Of quails there are 
plenty; they furnish great sport. From 5 
to 15 coveys can easily be started in a day. 
In some localities turkeys can yet be 
hunted, with a hope of fair success. 

F. P. Latham, Haslin, N. C. 



BUTCHERS, NOT SPORTSMEN. 

Here is an account of another party of 
men who have been making a public ex- 
hibition of their swinishness, and I hope 
you will assist in making it still more pub- 
lic. Such men are a disgrace to our Ameri- 
can civilization, and hardly deserve better 
treatment than they accord their victims. 
The readers of Recreation will, I am sure, 
heartily concur in the sentiments of the 
concluding paragraph of the article. 

C. A. H. 

Over in Piatt county, a few days ago, 40 to 50 men, who 
know how to handle shot guns, divided themselves into 2 
parties and started out for a day's slaughter of game, the 
losing side having to meet the expense of a supper. 

The men swept through the timber and over the prairies, 
slaughtering everything that looked like game ; and when 
night came had killed more than could be hauled on the 
largest dray in Champaign. 

There is nothing sportsmanlike in the wholesale killing off 
of game and there should be a law prohibiting it. Such 
coarse tests were common years ago, when the country was 
flooded with game ; but now what littie game remains should 
be protected from foolish men whose delight it is to get out 
like an army and sweep the country before them. — Cham- 
paign (111.) Gazette. 

I hope some of the readers of Recrea- 
tion, in Illinois, will give me the names of 
all these hogs in order that I may put them 
where they belong. — Editor. 



Antelope are again reported to be leav- 
ing the Yellowstone Park, for the lower 
country adjacent, where they are being 
slaughtered by hunters. The residents of 
the upper Yellowstone are desirous of af- 
fording these animals every protection 
provided by the Montana game laws; and 
to that end have petitioned the board of 
county commissioners for the appointment 
of Wallace Blaine, of Horr, as a special 
game warden for that section. 

Livingston (Mont.) Enterprise. 



Herein please find slip from " Nebraska 
State Journal." The game hog is here, as 
in many other places. We have just had a 
heavy snow, and now the market is flooded 
with game. Quails are selling for 30 cents 
a dozen. I saw 350 cottontails and 2 bushel 
baskets full of quails come in, the other 
day, for the market. 

Ring hunts are continually going on, 
around here. At one near Tecumseh, 1,300 



rabbits and 300 quails were killed. There 
seems to be no game law here, at all, in 
effect. All kinds of game are numerous, 
more so than in years; but if hunting keeps 
on in this way there will be nothing left for 
seed. 

I do enjoy the roasts you give the game 
hogs. 

Jas. P. Campbell, Lincoln, Neb. 

Here is the clipping: 

Large numbers of quails and prairie chickens are being 
shipped from Lincoln to the New York market. A dealer 
said he thought there had not been so many quails in the 
country for 10 years. He could not account for it unless it 
was due to McKinley prosperity. They come into this com- 
mission house in lots of 200 to 300. 



I wish you would find some other term 
than " hog " to apply to men who wan- 
tonly destroy game. You are unjust to the 
4 legged animal who has borne that cog- 
nomen, honorably, for ages. 

S. W. Everett. 



NOTES. 



Your list of Florida guides has length- 
ened somewhat lately, but I seldom see a 
report from a Florida sportsman. Your 
readers might think our animals extinct, 
save a few guides, but this is not the case. 
However, our game has been mercilessly 
slaughtered since the new game law was 
passed, allowing 4 months in which to 
hunt. The law reminded men who never 
before thought of hunting, that this was 
their only chance till the next winter; 
and they turned out, an army of them. I 
believe more game was killed in 2 seasons 
than had been killed before in 5 years. 
Two months is long enough in which to 
kill, while a heavy fine should be imposed 
on any one who offers game for sale. 

We have a good many black bear here, 
but few are killed, because few people have 
dogs that will stick 'to the chase long 
enough to tree one. 

Deer hunting will be good in some parts 
of our country this winter, and if the black- 
jack and scrub-acorn mast is plentiful a 
good many deer will come to the hills, dur- 
ing the winter months. If they are on the 
hills, we track them, but if they are on the 
prairies, it is best to " kick them out of a 
palmetto patch and shoot them on the fly." 

Owing to an unusually favorable spring, 
turkey hunting is good this winter. Quails 
are numerous. Parties coming here would 
do well to bring well-trained setters, for 
such dogs are scarce here. Deer-hounds 
would be unprofitable unless trained here. 

My favorite game is the turkey. I shot 
40 last season. You may call me a hog, 
but I sold only one, and that to a fellow 
who could not kill one — unless it was 
penned up. 

M. B. Carson, Frostproof, Fla. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



137 



In November Recreation I saw men- 
tion of Jim Beckwith, an old guide and 
trapper. None of the old timers seem to 
know where he died. Some say in Cali- 
fornia, some, near Denver, Col. I have it 
from good authority that during the winter 
of 1866-67, he was at Fort C. F. Smith, on 
the Big Horn river. The Sioux Indians at 
that time harassed the troops to such an 
extent that every team that went out for 
wood had a strong escort. John W. Smith 
is better acquainted with the Sioux, and 
the origin of all Indian outbreaks in the 
West, for the last 40 years, than any other 
man living to-day. He was at Fort C. F. 
Smith, that winter, with goods to trade to 
Indians. The Sioux were hostile at the 
time, and the Crows were not in the vicin- 
ity. He induced the commandant to allow 
him to send for the Crows. They would 
be a protection to the fort, and at the same 
time bring him trade. He sent Jim Beck- 
with and one soldier to the Yellowstone to 
bring the Crows. They found the Crows, 
and were returning with them when Beck- 
with took sick, and died, and was buried 
on a tributary of Clark's Fork, below Red 
Lodge; now in Carbon county, Mont. 
Thos. H. Irvine, Hamilton, Mont. 



has gone on apace. The winter of '92-'93 
was the worst on record. 

C. Greenwood, Lake Chelan, Wash. 



I have just returned from a short trip 
to the mountains to investigate a reported 
strike of rich gold ore. I and another man 
took a pack horse and landed near Deer 
Point. It was 20 miles to the new discov- 
ery and we followed the summit between 
Lake Chelan and the Methow. Looking 
at the rugged mountains from the water's 
edge, one would hardly expect to find a 
nice open country, fairly level, and full of 
beautiful little parks up there, but such is 
the case. The importance of the strike was 
exaggerated, as usual; one promising pros- 
pect and some poor ones were located. We 
made our way through the mountains, to 
Meadow creek, 20 miles farther up the 
lake. Big game seemed very scarce, al- 
though the surroundings appeared perfect 
for deer. We took our time and saw blue 
grouse in great numbers; but only 7 goats 
and 3 deer. These last were seen when 
near our journey's end. Only one bear 
sign was seen. We shot what grouse we 
needed, with my 32-40 Lyman sighted, sin- 
gle Winchester; but did not try for the 
deer, as we had unlimited down timber 
to contend with. From one point both Mt. 
Tacoma and Mt. Baker could be seen, as 
well as part of the Methow valley and the 
Okanogan hills. The effect of winter hunt- 
ing, in past years, is now painfully appar- 
ent. Deer go down the lake to winter on 
the open hillsides, and can be seen from the 
steamer's deck, at times. In February and 
March the snow crusts occasionally, and 
then, until the last 2 years, slaughtering 



Last fall when I took my annual hunting 
and fishing trip, up North, I carried with 
me several copies of Recreation; and 
there was not a moment when some of the 
boys were not perusing its pages. 

We had lots of sport, and a fine time in 
" Camp Comfort;" but seemingly the boys 
were " hoodooed," in regard to killing 
deer. They had quite a number of fine 
chances, but missed them all. The excuse 
given was, they did not want to kill any. 

I go North, week after next again, to 
join a party of friends, on our annual out- 
ing. I shall take my camera, and possibly 
can furnish you with some good views, and 
an account of our trip, later. Quails are 
numerous hereabouts, and after the 10th of 
November, we will have good shooting. I 
take several sportsmen's papers, but I con- 
sider Recreation the best of them all. 

Hope to get the next issue before going 
into camp. 

I congratulate you on the stand you take, 

regarding game hogs, and hope success 

will crown your effort to make every man, 

who owns a gun or rod, a true sportsman. 

A. L. G., Winchester, Ind. 



Have just returned from a fishing and 
hunting trip in Aroostook county, Me. I 
take pleasure in recommending Henry and 
George Gautier, of Benedicta, Me., as re- 
liable and competent guides and gentle- 
men. 

We hunt in the country known as the 
Aroostook and Dead river sections of 
Maine. I have been there for the last 10 
years, and never saw game so plenty as it 
is this fall. 

Ted, W. Somerville, Mass. 



It was thought that the recent killing of 
some Utes, by the game warden on Bear 
river, might make trouble; but the whole 
thing has quieted down. The Indians on 
White river took the trail for the reserva- 
tion as soon as they heard of the killing. 
We had trouble here in '87. with the Ind- 
ians, on account of the game, and they kept 
closer to their reservation for some time 
afterward. Then they began, coming up 
the river; getting a little further up each 
year, and killing all the deer they wanted 
for meat, and hides. I suppose there will 
be an investigation* by the Government, 
and the question whether the Utes have, or 
have not, a right to hunt here, in violation 
of the state laws, will be settled once for 
all. 

Bears have not holed up yet, but are high 
up on the mountains, ready to do so at the 
first big storm. 



i3« 



RECREATION. 



Elk are more numerous than for several 
years, and the calf crop has been good. 
J. M. Campbell, Buford, Col. 



As sportsmen are generally in doubt as 
to the best locality for moose, it may in- 
terest your numerous readers to know that 
Northern New Brunswick probably con- 
tains as good moose grounds as can be 
found. Several parties visited the Resti- 
gouche this season, and all seemed satisfied 
with their sport. Among the number, and 
one of the most successful, was Maj.-Gen. 
Eustace Hill, of the British Army. The 
General was at Stillwater, on the Resti- 
gouche river, and shot 3 bull moose. The 
antlers of 2 were greatly admired by all 
who saw them. The largest measured 4 
feet 7 inches across, and had 15 prongs. 
The heads are being mounted at Yarmouth, 
N. S., and when done the owner will send 
them to the Sportsmen's Exhibition, in 
New York. 

General Hill is a veteran sportsman, hav- 
ing hunted in India for many years, and is 
familiar with all kinds of game from the 
wild boar to the elephant. 

William Murray. 



Mr. F. W. Woodward, of Eau Claire, 
Wis., came to Warren for a goose hunt. 
He is the owner of a wheat farm near here, 
and comes each year, in October, to shoot. 
This year he invited a party of local hunt- 
ers to join him. He took 2 teams, a tent 
and everything necessary for comfort. It 
required 2 days to locate the geese. We 
pitched the tent near their feeding grounds, 
so the ladies of our party could see us 
shoot. Mr. Woodward got a shot at one 
flock and dropped 8, with No. 3 shot. We 
excused him that time, but told him not to 
do so again. We were not all in one field, 
but near enough to see the geese fall. We 
all got some shooting, and we killed 26 
geese. Mr. Woodward and the ladies rode 
into town with the finest lot of Canada 
geese ever brought to Warren. 

E. Slee, Warren, Minn. 



Last fall I went North from Mt. Home, 
in Idaho, to the Sawtooth range, not far 
from the headwaters of the Salmon and 
Payette rivers. There are bands of sheep 
over nearly all that country. They have 
driven out most of the deer and elk. Only 
by using considerable tact could I find 
elk. There have never been many large 
bear in that country, but there are quite 
a number of small black, brown and cin- 
namon bears. The country is rough. T 
found fine fishing in the streams, and all 
the game I wanted, except bear. It is not 
a good country for the Eastern man to 
visit, for game. 

B. M. Webster, Omaha, Neb. 



I hear that 6 imported pheasants were 
liberated in Northampton, near Akron, O. 
This is a step in the right direction. 

Those who have hunted the deep gulleys 
and steep hillsides of Northampton, know 
how hard it is to kill ruffed grouse there. 
If the pheasants once get a foothold we 
ought to have good shooting in a few 
years. These birds are protected in Ohio 
until 1900; and anyone bothering them, 
will get in trouble. 

If some birds were liberated in Copley 
swamp, it would be a good thiner too; but 
no better place could be found than that 
chosen, in the gullies along the Cuyahoga 
river, North of town. We hope the birds 
will thrive and be added to the list of game 
birds of Ohio. 

16 Gauge, Akron, O. 



I do not know what I would v do without 
Recreation. I can hardly wait for it from 
one month to another. There is little to 
hunt here. A few squirrels, rabbits, grouse 
and quails; all so wild that you cannot get 
within gunshot of them. The trouble here, 
is the same as in many other places; the 
game has no protection. Our game war- 
dens are not of the right kind. 

Two of them were looking for game law 
violators, and found them, to their own 
sorrow. They saw 2 men running rabbits, 
with hounds, before the season opened. 
The hunters resisted arrest, pointing their 
guns at the wardens until the latter backed 
out of range. The hunters then made their 
escape. 

J. A. Richardson, Pittston, Pa. 



I have been watching for news from this 
vicinity in your excellent magazine. Quails 
are more plentiful this season than for 5 or 
6 years past. If we have a mild winter, 
there will be plenty next year. Am sorry 
to say, we have hunters here with bristles 
on their necks. A party of 3 were out last 
week for a 2 or 3 days' hunt, and returned 
with 300 quails, 15 grouse and a number of 
rabbits. I think r / 2 that amount of game, 
should be enough for any 3 hogs. The law 
should limit the amount of small as well 
as of large game, to be taken by one per- 
son. News in our home paper, proves 
that our fish commissioner and his deputy 
are not asleep. We have very good men 
in those positions. 

S. H. G., Goshen, Ind. 



Southeast Texas was once a hunter's 
paradise; but the game hogs have gotten 
in their work, and not much big game is 
left. 

Small game, such as rabbits, squirrels, 
quails and doves, are still quite plentiful. 
Quails are here by thousands, and seem to 
be increasing. This is because few gun- 
ners hunt them. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



i39 



For small game shooting 1 use a 22 Mar- 
lin repeater; and recommend it to anyone 
looking for a rifle for this purpose. 

If M. A. Lewis intends to shoot nothing 
larger than ducks, I advise him to buy the 
22 calibre rifle. 

The short cartridge is the thing to use 
on such game as grouse and quails; while 
for ducks, etc., the long rifle cartridges are 
all right. 

For game as large as geese, the 25 or 32 
calibre would be better. 

E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Tex. 



The Klondike boom has helped Seattle, 
but there is nothing permanent about it. 

Hundreds of men have left this country 
for Alaska. They are still at Skaguay or 
back here again. This boom is one of the 
silliest things imaginable. Old men, feeble 
men, inexperienced men and all kinds of 
men, are going there; and when they get 
there they will wonder, why they went. 

A young, robust, single man, out of em- 
ployment, experienced and with some 
means, may do well enough; but for others 
to go, is folly. 

Men in search of adventure, with means 
to gratify their desire, may find what they 
are looking for; but if they want hunting, 
they will get left. There is no game after 
leaving Skaguay, or getting into the snow 
and ice. They laugh at a man who packs 
a rifle over the trail, or through the pass. 

Alaska proper, below the timber line is 
another thing entirely. But the settling up 
of that country will destroy the goose that 
laid the golden egg. Our geese and ducks 
will not be killed by the market hunter, the 
game hog or the spring shooter. They will 
be destroyed on their breeding grounds; 
and we will have to depend for our supply 
on such as straggle down from the extreme 
frozen North. 

But thus it goes. Civilization advances: 
the game retreats and disappears. Man 
reclaims the land but obliterates every liv- 
ing wild creature. 

J. C. Nattrass, New Whatcom, Wash. 



I notice in October Recreation, an ar- 
ticle by D. L. C. on deer in Vermont. I 
spent 7 weeks in Washington and Windsor 
counties, and can corroborate the state- 
ments made in the article mentioned. 

While there, I saw fawns feeding uncon- 
cernedly in the fields. One came within 
20 rods of my father's house at midday; 
and after feeding for a while, crossed the 
road and disappeared in the woods. Deer 
is not the only game in Vermont, for ruffed 
grouse are plenty. Woodchucks and 
coons are to be found in good numbers. 
My father set a trap in his cornfield, for 
coons, and caught 2 in it at once. Each 
coon had 2 legs in the jaws of the trap. 

C. H. R., Leominster, Mass. . 



I am located in Southern Idaho, at 
Weiser, where the river of that name 
empties in the great Snake river. There 
are no quails in this section. In the spring 
and fall we have fair duck shooting on the 
rivers. Often, 4 or 5 persons will kill 10 
to 15 ducks in a day, on the Weiser. The 
finest duck and goose shooting, in this part 
of Idaho, is found on the Payette river, 16 
miles from here. Grouse, both ruffed and 
pinnated, are numerous. Deer and a few 
black bears can be found within 20 or 30 
miles. On the headwaters of Salmon river, 
150 miles from Weiser, deer, elk and bears 
are plentiful. 

I am not a guide, but would take pleasure 
in giving any brother hunter information 
about this country. 

John W. Ayers, Weiser, Idaho. 



A few weeks ago a hunter, named Pow- 
ers, was gathering huckleberries in the 
woods about 10 miles from Tacoma, and in 
the neighborhood of Gig Harbor. While 
engaged in filling his baskets he suddenly 
came upon a pack of 7 bears which were 
feeding on the same luscious berries, and 
for which they have an especial fondness. 
Fortunately Mr. Powers had taken his rifle 
along and he quickly brought down one 
of the bears. The others took to their 
heels. He put a second bullet into the 
wounded bear to finish him. The big 
black fellow's carcass, weighing about 300 
pounds, was on exhibition in front of a 
C. street market the next day. 

M. S. H., Tacoma, Wash. 



Sheriff W. S. Tuttle, of Keene, who is 
one of the best bird shots in New Hamp- 
shire, made a new record for himself, hunt- 
ing woodcock. Four birds were bagged in 
succession, with the first barrel, and the 
fifth was missed with the first barrel and 
shot with the second. A sixth was missed, 
but was replaced by a plump grouse. The 
setter used on this occasion was a Llewel- 
lyn, procured by the sheriff some months 
since, in Washington, Pa. 

Edward W. Wild, Keene, N. H. 



Last week I camped, for 2 days, with 2 
friends at Island pond, in Hampstead, 
N. H. The weather was beautiful, and we 
enjoyed camping exceedingly. I shot 12 
ruffed grouse, 4 rabbits and a woodcock. 
The other boys had equally good success. 
Game appears to, be plentiful this season. 

Recreation is having a great sale at our 
news-stands. I hope it will attain a still 
larger circulation, as it is the best sports- 
man's journal in existence. 

Waumbek, Lawrence, Mass. 



140 



RECREATION. 



' I do not think you are right in calling the 
man a hog who caught 260 perch; as they 
are a nuisance in this locality. They are al- 
together too plenty. 

I see no need of buying goods that are 
not advertised in Recreation, so long as 
the best of guns, fishing tackle and other 
sportsmen's goods are advertised in it. I 
do not see why the Colts revolvers are not 
represented in Recreation. 

Do you limit the term sportsmen to 
shooters and anglers; or do you include 
horse racers, prize fighters and such? 
Which do you consider best — as a bird dog 
— a pointer or setter. 

R. J. B., Hillsboro Bridge, N. H. 

No; horse racers, prize fighters and such 
like are not sportsmen. They are sporting 
men. The term " sportsman " is generally 
held to include shooters, anglers, yachts- 
men, canoemen, etc. 

As to the superiority of the setter or 
pointer, that is purely a matter of taste. 
Both are good. Many shooters prefer the 
pointer, while as many others prefer the 
setter. 

If a maker of sportsmen's goods does not 
advertise in Recreation that would seem 
to mean that he does not wish the readers 
of Recreation to buy or to use his goods. 
The Marlin revolver is as good as any 
made in this country, and is advertised in 
this magazine. — Editor. 



Were it not for the heavy sage brush and 
grease wood, the bottom lands of the 
Snake river in Owyhee and Washington 
counties, Idaho, would be the finest place 
in the West for coursing contests. It is 
possible to jump 7 to 10 jack rabbits to 
the acre. Never in all my travels have I 
seen anything to compare with it. 

Prof. O. D. Carper, of La Grande, Ore., 
recently captured a beautiful snowy owl, 
while hunting on the Grand Ronde river, 
Oregon. Also a young bald eagle, which 
had a spread of 4 feet. A yellow lynx was 
taken alive, too, which, he says, Mr. Car- 
lin's picture exactly portrays. 

It is reported by all local sportsmen and 
ranchers that this season grouse, sage 
hens, wild ducks in Canyon, Ada and 
Owyhee counties are unusually plentiful. 
A big bag of ducks can be secured at any 
time, by only a short walk from this place. 
All along the line of the Oregon Short 
Line Railroad, between Mountain Home 
and Payette, there can be found splendid 
wild fowl shooting. In the Boise and 
Payette valleys,* quails are particularly nu- 
merous; but I believe are protected for 
some years yet. Between Shoshone and 

* Quails are not natives of Idaho. They were " planted " 
in this valley some years ago, the stock being brought 
from Nebraska. — Editor. 



Glenn's Ferry antelope can be seen from 
the car windows, and sportsmen could 
easily find plenty of sport there without 
taking long journeys from the railroad, in- 
land. M. W. Miner, Caldwell, Idaho. 



Game is plentiful this season, particularly 
deer. 

It is amusing to think of clipping a buf- 
falo head to show the horns; for if it is in 
good condition the horns barely show. 

In the spring of 1865, I was on the divide 
South of the Republican river, West of 
Fort Kearny. As far as I could see, to the 
South and West, the buffalo were moving. 
And now they are all gone! 

Jack Hickman, Lebanon, Ore. 



Mr. Warner and I were out 21 days in 
the mountains, with Frank Peterson, of 
Jackson, Wyo., as guide. We killed elk, 
sheep, antelope and deer. Mr. Peterson 
proved a competent guide and packer. He 
knows the country thoroughly; also the 
habits and haunts of the game. We had a 
very enjoyable time. 

J. B. Castle, Sandwich, 111. 



Game in this locality is rapidly diminish- 
ing. This is due to lack of sufficient protec- 
tion, or to the wolves. 

This year our law provides for a license 
for every hunter; $30 for non-residents, and 
$1 for those fortunate enough to live in the 
state. This license applies to deer hunters 
only. 

F. B., Gordon, Wis. 



The squirrel season opened September 
1st. I succeeded in bagging 11, the first 2 
days. Could have had more, but have no 
desire to herd with the swine. 

James S. McCain, Washington, N. J. 



Game and fish are not abundant in this 
vicinity, owing to too much illegal hunting 
and fishing. 

K. G. F., Columbiana, O. 



Wanted: A means of exterminating an 
animal found all over the United States, 
but more common in New England vil- 
lages, and known as the French-Canadian 
Hare Lifter and Partridge Fence Builder. 

Kindly state if I could use the same 
means on the animal that keeps company 
with a hound and small long bodied rodent, 
carried with them in a sack. 

I have a family and a gun. Both of these 
I respect; but the latter will not be of much 
use unless someone who knows will help 
me. Tim, Hartford, Conn. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



IS THE OUANANICHE A FRAUD? 

The September number of Recreation, 
containing an article under the above title, 
over the name of J. C. French, M.D., of 
Quebec, is before me. I feel it a duty to 
give my opinion of the game qualities of 
this fish, which has called forth the con- 
demnation of the doctor in such unstinted 
terms against the railway, hotel, people, 
and in fact the entire environment of the 
fish. He evidently expects his letter will 
not go without protest, for, in closing, he 
says: " It is a matter of opinion, and I 
claim a right to mine," a point which I do 
not think would have been questioned by 
anyone. 

I have devoted considerable study to the 
ouananiche, and purpose, in as few words 
as possible, to give my opinion of him, 
without any wandering off into discussions 
of the amount of water controlled by the 
Roberval Hotel Co. ; the railway connec- 
tions; the expense of fishing, or into state- 
ments of how much fishing some of my 
friends have done in different parts of the 
globe, as a means of qualifying them to 
be judges of the game qualities of the 
ouananiche. 

I agree with Dr. French that, in taking 
the fly, this fish does not execute a double 
summersault, as does the brook trout, 
sometimes; but most emphatically I do 
say he does rise to the fly, and takes it at 
the surface of the water. Will a fly sink, 
when cast upon swift, turbulent water, such 
as this fish lives in? If this fish took the 
fly in still water, I have no doubt we should 
see considerable commotion at the spot, 
but I have never seen one yet take the fly 
in still water. 

The picture drawn of this fish, lying in 
swift rapids, and endeavoring to " suck 
down " an artificial fly, as it is dancing 
about in the rough water, makes me smile. 

I have observed that a good portion of 
his food consists of insect life, and a favor- 
ite haunt of his is in eddies, below falls, 
where the water is covered with foam. In 
such places I have seen, at one time, fins of 
a dozen ouananiche, darting about, in the 
search of food. 

Out of 30 or 40 ouananiche I have 
caught, and a great many others hooked 
and lost, not One failed to jump from the 
water his entire length — most of them 
twice — on being hooked. I have even seen 
them double up at the same time, in the 
effort to strike the line and dislodge the 
hook. 

I have never trolled for this fish, with 
flies sunk in the water, as described in the 
article in question. I prefer to take him on 
the cast, as heretofore. 

As to size — 4 pounds is a good-sized 



ouananiche. My opinion, gained from ex- 
perience, is that after an angler has hooked 
and landed one of this weight, he will feel 
he has met a foe well worth his best skill 
as a fisherman. I have the picture before 
me now as I experienced it: ''The quick 
rise, sharp strike; then as the prick of the 
hook is felt, the beautiful shining, sym- 
metrical form of the fish, leaping into the 
air at the sting; every inch of his silvery, 
glistening sides aquiver with muscular en- 
ergy; the splash and again another leap, 
and as he settles once more to the water, 
a magnificent rush down stream and the 
fight has fairly begun." ' 

After having enjoyed some of the finest 
sport of my life in pursuit of the ouanan- 
iche I cannot allow an article, which seems 
to me to present the matter in such an un- 
fair light, to go unnoticed; and I know of 
others who will feel as I do, if they see Dr. 
French's letter. 

G. H. Hale, Malone, N. Y. 



A PUNCH AT FISH HOGS-AND OTHERS. 

Chicago, 111. 

Editor Recreation: Just home from 2 
weeks of loafing around Lake Mills, Wis., 
and feel inclined to give poachers and hogs 
a punch. May I? 

Lake Mills — or more properly, Rock 
lake — is a pretty sheet of water, with no 
visible inlet, and varying in depth from 3 
or 4 to 70 feet. In shallow sections, of con- 
siderable extent, large mouth bass are 
taken. A considerable stream flows from 
the lake, and, furnishes power for a flouring 
mill. Rock lake is about 3^ miles in 
length, with an average width of i l / 2 miles. 

As in many of these little bodies of water, 
when under no restriction, the piscatory 
hog had shot, speared and netted the fish, 
until few remained. The local sportsmen, 
decided that something must be done to 
preserve what were left. Mr. Wm. Howe, 
the owner of the boat livery, on the lake, 
obtained the support of those interested in 
keeping up the reputation of the place as 
a summer resort, and he was made fish and 1 
game warden. 

The doom of the poacher and hog was 
sealed. This was 2 years ago; and to-day 
the lake is full of 2 year old pickerel, pike 
and bass. Several arrests and convictions 
were necessary to secure this result. 

Now, as a contrast to this: A chain of 
lakes in Northern Illinois has not been 
guarded, and unsportsmanlike methods of 
taking fish have been freely used. In 
Channel lake, for instance, a few years ago. 
one could take a big string of bass and 
pickerel. Now there are days when one 



141 



142 



RECREA TION. 



can hardly capture enough, in a long day, 
for a small family's dinner. Yet, a friend 
who deplores the passing of the good days 
on these lakes, wrote me in May of the 
fine fishing he had in March. He captured 
pickerel weighing 10 to 14 pounds, in the 
slough! 

Those who chase fish into shallow water 
and shoot or spear them, forget they are 
killing the goose that lays the golden egg; 
and that every female fish killed, in early 
spring, is full of eggs which die with her. 

Plenty of so-called sportsmen in Chicago 
sneak out to Delavan, or some other lake, 
a few days before the open season, to get 
ahead of the genuine sportsmen. A year 
ago some of these men were surprised by 
the warden, who secured a pretty sum out 
of the fines they paid. One well-known 
fisherman only escaped by wrapping his 
ill gotten spoils in his overcoat, and sneak- 
ing to the train, across lots. 

There is a humorous side to' the theory 
of fish planting. Among the varieties 
which have been placed in many of the 
lakes hereabout, are the white bass of the 
lakes, and the whitefish. Now, I never 
caught a white bass except during a limited 
season, in the spring, when they run in 
schools, and will bite at a naked hook in 
their then excited condition. I have seen 
the water in Lake Erie, fairly foam with 
their antics. On one occasion, a party of 
3 of us took a washtub full of white bass, at 
the mouth of the Raisin river, in less than 
2^/2 hours, and did not have bait half the 
time.* 

The whitefish rarely takes bait. I have 
never seen but one on a hook. In a lake 
where angling is the only permitted 
method of capturing fish, the result of 
whitefish planting will either call for an 
amended law, or a 16 pound fish will be no 
rarity in such waters. 

C. C. Haskins. 



FISHING THROUGH THE ICE. 

In November Recreation, a request is 
made for instruction in fishing through the 
ice. I have had some experience in winter 
fishing, having lived 16 years on Big Stone 
lake, at Ortonville, Minn. There the game 
hogs abound in summer, and catch fish by 
the hundreds. 

For fishing through the ice, you need a 
good ice chisel and ax, to chop the holes. 

Go to some rocky point about 400 feet 
from the shore, and where the water is 
from 10 to 12 feet deep. 

Cut a hole 15 or 18 inches wide, and trim 
off the sharp edge at the bottom, so it will 
not cut the line when a fish is caught. 



* A washtub full for 3 men ? How much does a washtub 
full of fish weiyli > Some 150 to 200 pounds, eh ? You are 
giving the fish hogs a punch ; what do you call these 3 
men ?— Editor. 



Then cut from trees, some branches 3 feet 
long and one inch thick at the larger end 
and tapering to ^2 inch at the other. 

About 2 feet from the large hole, cut a 
s'mall one, 4 or 5 inches deep, and in it put 
a stick, so that the other end will be about 
2 feet above the large hole. Fill the hole, 
around the stick, with snow or ice chips 
and water, and let it freeze. When the 
sticks are frozen in solidly, tie on your 
lines. Have them about 15 feet long, but 
do not let all of the line down; coil some 
of it near the stick, in such a way that when 
the fish pulls, it will uncoil and let him run. 
Attach your hook to the line with 6 inches 
or so of wire, that the fish may not bite off 
the line. 

The bait is the next thing, and is hard to 
get in winter. If the creeks are not yet 
frozen, you can get minnows with a net. 
Put them in a perforated box, and sink it 
where you are fishing. Another way to 
keep minnows is to salt them, but they are 
not so good as live bait. 

If you cannot catch minnows, find a 
place where perch will bite and secure 
some of them for bait. Use a small piece 
of meat on a small hook, and in a short 
time you will have perch enough to bait 
your lines. 

When baited, you can leave them until 
night, and then reset them. In the morn- 
ing look after your lines, as soon after day- 
light as possible. If you wait too long, 
some of the fish will get off. 

C. G. Lindquist, Corona, S. Dak. 



DO EEL-TRAPS CATCH FISH? 

While travelling through Pennsylvania, 
and particularly along the main branches 
of the Susquehanna river, my attention was 
called to a device, known as an " eel-trap." 
It struck me as being well qualified to 
gather in much besides eels. The water 
being very low, the conditions seemed par- 
ticularly favorable for this contrivance, and 
they were seen at frequent intervals. They 
are remarkably efficient for their purpose, 
as I was informed. 

Now is there any reason why this device 
— the long V-shaped dam pointing down 
stream, with a basket at the apex and only 
outlet — will not catch fish also? 

I was told, at Lock Haven, of one trap 
just below that city, yielding 300 eels in one 
morning. I think any fish that found it- 
self in such a place would be in a danger- 
ous position. 

I am not a fisherman, but am a lover of 
true sport and fair play. These traps may 
be the most harmless affairs imaginable, 
for everything except eels; but I should 
like some reliable information as to wheth- 
er they injuriously affect the fish. 

" Cervus," Scranton, Pa. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



143 



TYPES FOR ICE FISHING. 

Hartford, Ct. 
Editor Recreation: I send you draw- 
ings of what I call a good type for fishing 
through the ice. I have used over ioo of 



A 



n 

E 



J\ 



FIG. I 



FIG.Z 



these, for 5 years, and never found any 
trouble with them. If this is not plain 
enough let any reader of Recreation send 




FIG. 3 FIG. 4 

TYPES FOR ICE FISHING. 



me his address and I will send him a 
model to work by. They are easily made 
and very compact. 

One piece of any wood, hard or soft, 16, 
18 or 20 inches long by %. inch thick, i l / 2 
wide. Two pieces of hard brass wire, for 
staples to hold the spring still. One piece 
of flat spring steel %. or Y% wide by 1-32 
thick, 16, 18 or 20 inches according to 
length of wood. This should be heated and 
bent over so as to hold brass ring and flag. 
One piece of soft brass wire stapled to 
wood, about 10 inches from bottom, to 
hold the line and spring steel piece with 
flag. The ring slides over the bent end of 
the brass piece. Geo. E. Lucas. 



FISH NOTES. 

A mistake I have seen a dozen times, in 
sportsmen's papers, is in giving the size of 
trolling spoons by merely saying: " I use 
a No. 2 or a No. 4 spoon." 

Unfortunately, different manufacturers 
do not all number the same way. 

I have just made an improvement on the 
ordinary form, which eliminates several 
points that have been annoying in the or- 
dinary trolling spoons. I refer to fouling. 
caused by the triple hooks swinging 
around and catching into the line, when 
casting. In fact, the hooks do not stay 
where they belong; they have too much 
motion. I have more than once lost a fish 
by his shaking open the spring that holds 
the swivel or the one that holds the back 
hooks. I have got around these troubles 
by 2 simple devices. The hooks are held 
straight back and can be changed easily, if 
necessary, but the fish cannot do the shift- 
ing. I think anglers will appreciate these 
advantages. I expect "to get a patent 
shortly. Wm. T. Morrison. 



I am a regular reader of your valuable 
magazine, and would not be without it for 
5 times its price. 

About the first of September, I spent a 
week on the Big Fork river, one of the 
best trout streams in this part of Montana. 
It is about 30 miles Southeast of Kalispell, 
and flows Northeast into Flat Head lake. 
We had the best of luck, catching all we 
wanted to eat. The game hog is here as 
well as elsewhere. There was another partv 
on the river, and they caught 300 to 600 
trout a day to the man. 

We caught 4 trout that measured 26 
inches long. 

Small game is quite plentiful here this 
fall, and I think there will be a good many 
deer this winter. 

J. W., Kalispell, Mont. 



Five Ishpeming sportsmen (!!), Messrs. 
Claus Adolph, John Sodergren, John An- 



144 



RECREA TION. 



derson, Alex Swanson and J. Kilstrom, 
made the largest catch of bass and pickerel 
ever secured in this county. They brought 
home over 400 pounds of bass and pickerel, 
besides many perch, as the result of 3 days' 
fishing, on Lake Independence, 15 miles 
North of the city, and not far from Lake 
Superior. 

Ishpeming, Mich., paper. 

One would scarce expect the genus fish 
hog to thrive so far North. But then, nat- 
ure is full of surprises. — Editor. 



I am just in from Eagle creek, B. C. 
Last Thursday I stood on the rocky shore 
of that little stream and saw millions of 
salmon swimming down the creek. They 
were all of nearly one size, weighing about 
2 pounds each. They were on their way 
from spawning beds. 

A day or so later, I was on the banks 
of the Fraser river. There the upward run 
of salmon was even greater. I could have 
stood on the shore, at a point where the 
land projected into the stream, and with a 
pitchfork could have taken out a ton of fish 
in an hour. These salmon ranged from 4^2 
tp 15 pounds. C. E. L., Portland, Ore. 



In reply to the inquiry in recent issue of 
Recreation, for a successful sturgeon bait, 
I will say the fishermen along the Snake 
and Columbia rivers use eels for bait, and 
they seldom fail to get fish. The eels are 
cut into lengths of 6 or 8 inches. One of 
these parts is slipped on the hook, entirely 
back of the barb, leaving the point ex- 
posed; a heavy sinker keeps line and bait 
on the bottom. Trot-lines are generally 
used for sturgeon fi'shing, in the Snake 
river. Fish weighing 100 to 600 pounds are 
not uncommon. Some measuring 12 feet 
in length have been caught this way, with 
eel bait. 

M. W. Miner, Caldwell, Idaho. 



Since I last wrote, we have inaugurated 
a new enterprise in this county, which, I 
think, will be a great boon to all lovers of 
" the gentle art " on this coast. Mendocino 
is the best watered county in the state, hav- 
ing some 3,000 miles of current trout 
waters. 

Since the advent of the San Francisco 
& North Pacific Railroad to this place, the 
increase of fishermen induced the Railway 
company to build an extensive hatchery 
here. Thus taking time by the forelock, 
instead of waiting until the streams were 
depleted. Alfred V. La Motte. 

Ukiah, Mendocino Co., Cal. 



Your magazine is all right, and has many 
enthusiastic readers here. 

There are a few trout in one stream here, 
and there might be more, for we have many 
nice lakes and streams. Our town is on 
the Kalamazoo river, which abounds in 
carp (they are the most worthless fish I 
ever saw) and perch, pike and black bass. 

I use a 6 ounce lance-wood rod, for all 
kinds of fishing. I do not catch many fish, 
but those I do get, afford much sport. 

Ed. Blossom, Otsego, Mich. 



I arrived in this little mountain town one 
day, and an event to which I had looked 
forward to with joyful anticipation began 
the next morning, terminating with even- 
ing in a fine catch of bass, taken from the 
Youghiogheny. 

The river is in good condition for fish- 
ing, and a number of persons from Pitts- 
burg, McKeesport and Altoona were there 
enjoying the sport. 

L. L. Litman, Fredericksville, Md. 



At last we have our black bass hatchery 
started, and we of the rod and gun, are 
pleased. The ponds run East and West, 
and the railroad is West of them, about 100 
feet. The water is cold spring water; very 
clear, and plenty of it. So I think we are 
certain to have our lakes and rivers well 
stocked in the near future. The buildings 
will be put up next spring. 

S. Harting, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Pheasant and grouse are more numerous 
this season than last. Snipe and plover are 
here, while teal and " sprigs " are arriving. 

Some time ago a local sportsman caught 
a 5 pound trout in the Quilicene river 
about 30 miles from here. On opening 
it, to see what the trout were feeding on, 
he found a small kitten. 

F. D. J., Port Townsend, Wash. 



I fished 2 days at Tomahawk lake and 
caught a nice lot of bass and muskalonge. 
S. M. Eaton, Watertown, Wis. 



Will you please inform me, through Rec- 
reation, what kinds of bait to use, and the 
seasons of catching the wall eyed pike. 
Also lake trout? We have both here, but 
no one knows how to fish for them. . I am 
greatly pleased with Recreation and like 
the way you give it to the hogs. 

H. S. Estabrook, Hartford, Pa. 

Will some of the brethren please en- 
lighten Mr. Estabrook? — Editor. 



Recreation came to hand punctually, as 
usual, and was perused with much pleasure. 



ALWAYS MENTION RECREA- 
TION WHEN ANSWERING ADS. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



MERITS AND pEMERITS OF THE 3°-4°- 

Editor Recreation: Have just returned 
from a long trip and want to express my- 
self on the gun and ammunition question. 

I will lay J. J. Adams' letter before me, 
and take it line by line. 

He says Mr. Van Dyke advocates the 
50 calibre and M. P. Dunham a 25-35; and 
remarks " How doctors disagree." Both 
these men are perhaps correct. One man 
can handle a cannon, and not be troubled 
by the noise and recoil. Dunham possibly 
is " not built that way," and uses what is 
best adapted to his peculiar organization. 
I know him personally and he is one of the 
great army of small bore men. 

J. J. A. does not think a 25 or 30 will 
stop a bear or elk, as quickly as a 45 or 50. 
To this I must say I know better. I have 
shot 7 elk with the 30-40, and with one ex- 
ception, they dropped the second they were 
struck; while I have shot deer, and seen 
them shot, with 45 and 50 calibres that went 
long distances before falling. 

The statement that it requires a heavy 
ball to stop a bear, is in one sense correct. 
I have killed several, and would prefer Mr. 
Dunham's 25 through the neck of a big 
bear, rather than Mr. Van Dyke's 50 
through its abdomen. In a case like that 
one 25 would be worth 6 or 8 50s. 

Now as to the 44-40-200: The most of my 
bear killing was done with that calibre; but 
after a little experience with a large black 
bear, in which he was shot through the 
heart twice, heart grazed deeply once, and 
8 other holes through different parts of his 
anatomy, I concluded that a larger gun 
would be in or*der. 

Having used all makes and calibres for 
some years past, on large game, I must 
say the killing power of the 30-40 soft point 
suits me the best of any I have yet used. 
Where there is no snow, it is the gun par 
excellence, as the beast drops and you don't 
have to hunt wounded game by a scanty 
blood track. One of my elk was gut shot, 
and was found about 50 yards off, dead. 

So far I have said nothing about the 
sighting, or lock work of the 30-40. Its 
killing power is superb, but the sighting is 
too high by about 200 yards. The trigger 
action is a miserable fake, on account of 
the crawl it has. The box magazine is so 
placed as to make it awkward to carry the 
gun, either in the hand or on the shoulder. 
It is slow and clumsy to load, and from the 
way the lever splits and works over the box 
or pocket, the lock gets full of dust or 
water very easily. Another point that has 
been overlooked, about the small bore, is 
the nuisance they are to clean. No stick 
can stand the pressure. My advice to any 



person who wants a gun with great killing 
power, and very low trajectory, equal or 
superior in these respects to the best makes 
of English express rifles, is to get a 30-40 
single shot; but leave the repeater alone. 
E. T. Conyngham, M.D., 

Philipsburg, Mont. 



Editor Recreation: After using rifles 
for 25 years, and of 12 to 15 different makes 
and calibres, I think I may venture to ex- 
press my opinion of the new fad — the, 
smokeless rifles. The commendatory let- 
ters about the 30-30, smokeless and soft 
nose bullets does not, in the opinion of 
every rifleman, make that arm the ne plus 
ultra of the hunter. The killing of men, is 
the province of such a dangerous arm, and 
it was primarily invented for that purpose. 

Smokeless powder no doubt has come to 
stay. For shot and shot guns it is an im- 
provement over black powder, but not for 
rifles. 

The yearning of the rising generation, 
for a rifle that will weigh but a few ounces 
and will kill up to 300 yards, without 
changing sights, is painful indeed. They 
want no recoil; no smoke; no noise; no 
weight; handsome enough to be framed, 
and hung in the parlor. 

Seventy to 100 grains of black powder, in 
a 38, 40 or 45 calibre rifle, has range and 
killing power for any animal on this con- 
tinent. Then why this cry for a rifle still 
more deadly? 

Game is not killed at a greater distance 
than 300 yards, except in rare instances, 
and 90 per cent, of it, at 100 yards; what 
does a man want of a gun to kill up to 800 
yards. And why does he want to endanger 
the life of a fellow man? 

Hank Hunkamunk, Evanston, 111. 



AS TO LYMAN SIGHTS. 

A rifle fitted with, the Lyman combina- 
tion rear sight, leaf sight and ivory hunt- 
ing, or ivory bead, front sight, will do 
nearly twice as good work as one with 
open sights. 

It is more difficult to see the front sight, 
when using open sights, than with a tang 
sight; because with the former, you see 
only the tip of the front sight, while with 
a Lyman tang sight, you see it all. 

I use no middle sight except when shoot- 
ing in the evening. Then, by turning up 
the ivory triangle on the leaf sight, I can 
shoot when I would not otherwise know 
just where the front sight is. If one thinks 
his sights are not in line, he can turn up the 
crotch of the leaf sight, and find out by 
aiming at some object, if the 3 are in line. 



145 



146 



RECREA TION. 



One of the advantages, is that the view 
is not obstructed. A man has all he can 
do to look after front and hind sights, and 
the game, without a third sight to confuse 
him. 

Both eyes should be open when using 
this sight. Pay more attention to the front 
sight and the game, than to the rear sight. 
After a little practice, the sights seem to 
come in line naturally; the light in the 
centre of the aperture being stronger than 
around the edges. 

Use the large aperture, if it looks too 
dark through the small one. 

The ivory hunting front sight is larger 
than the ivory bead, and better for quick 
shooting. It is stronger, also. For a large 
rifle I would take the ivory bead, because 
at a long distance, a coarse sight will cover 
up an object, where a small one would not. 
Care should be taken with these sights, as 
the ivory will stand no rough usage. 

I tried these sights on a Marlin 22 calibre 
'97 model, and could not have had better 
success than with them. 

I am now fitting my 40-82, with them. 

Will some reader of Recreation, who 
uses them, give his opinion on Lyman shot 
gun sights? 

C. W. Perry, Helena, Mont. 



In answer to R. B. B. of St. Louis, Mo., 
in November Recreation, I will give my 
experience with the Lyman sights, which 
I have used for 12 years. I bought an ivory 
hunting front sight and combination rear 
sight, and put them on a '73 model, 32 
Winchester repeater; but left the original 
rear sight on the rifle. I had the Lyman 
sights set to 75 yards point blank range, 
and could do fair shooting. I then removed 
the rear open sight, and was surprised at 
the result. I was considered a good shot 
with open sights, but the Lyman sights im- 
proved my shooting more than 50 per cent. 
My advice, Brother R. B. B., is to take 
the rear open sight off your rifle to obtain 
the best results. 

With the Lyman sights, the light and 
shadows in the woods, so deceiving to one 
who uses open sights, have no terrors. In 
making running or flying shots, you will 
score more hits than with open sights. I 
own two rifles, equipped with Lyman 
sights; a Winchester '73 model, 32-20, and 
a Marlin '92 model, 22. My next is to be 
a Stevens Ideal 25-21. We have little game 
here which can be hunted with a rifle. I 
have only killed 3 fox squirrels with the 
little Marlin, and they dropped as though 
struck by a thunder bolt. I have lots of 
sport with crows and hawks, using the 22 
long rifle cartridge. With the Winchester, 
I have killed everything in the shape of 
game, from deer down, and have made kill- 
ing shots at distances that could not be 
made with ooen sights. 

W. R. C, Joliet, 111. 



WIRE CARTRIDGES. 

Where can I obtain wire cartridges? I 
have asked several ammunition dealers in 
New York. Some had never heard of such 
a thing, and others declared they went 
out of use with the muzzle loader. The 
latter statement is not correct, for they are 
still manufactured by Eley Bros, and Joyce, 
of England; and are much used for wild 
fowl shooting in the British Islands, where 
cover is scarce and the birds wild. 

Of course wire cartridges cannot be used 
in a heavily choked barrel; but in a cylin- 
der barrel they sometimes give excellent 
results, and at surprisingly long range. If 
not to be had here, could I get them by 
mail from England, and would they be 
dutiable? 

Mr. Cashmore, is correct as to the 
Schrapnel Shell Co. Freelock Bros, of 
Parliament Street, Dublin, used to be 
agents for those goods. I once wrote them 
about the shells; and they replied that they 
did not sell the schrapnels except when 
loaded into cartridges. I believe they are 
made in 12 gauge as well as in the larger 
sizes. 

By the way, if all sportsmen could haVe 
guns like the one spoken of by Mr. Rich- 
ardson, in the November Recreation, 
concentrating devices would not be needed. 
At 190 yards, using a 14 gauge gun, this 
gentleman filled a jacksnipe so full of No. 9 
shot that the bird sank to the bottom of 
the lake before it could be retrieved. Well! 
Well! Well! Greenheart. 



NOTES. 



Homer Raleigh, in November Recrea- 
tion, asks "How to learn to shoot with a 
rifle at running game." 

First get Lyman sights, then send to 
Wm. Lyman — whose address is in Recrea- 
tion's advertising pages — for catalogue, 
and follow directions given therein. With 
practice, you will find you can kill game 
on the run, and often birds flying. . 

I lately returned from a fishing and hunt- 
ing trip to the White river country. I used 
a 30-40, model '95, Winchester, fitted with 
Lyman sights, and am well pleased with 
cartridge, rifle and sights. I used large 
opening on the sight, and killed running 
deer and birds flying. The last bird I shot, 
was a pigeon hawk, flying just above the 
ground, 146 paces from where I was sitting 
on my horse. I held the ivory bead about 
2 inches in front of the shoulder joint; did 
not think of or see rear sight. The bullet 
went through the shoulders. 

R. B. B. asks if the open rear sight on 
barrel, does not obstruct view of rear Ly- 
man sight. It does, and should be taken 
off. 

Recreation is the best and cleanest 
sportsmen's magazine published. 

A. H. Ketcham. D.D.S., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 



*47 



Canton, O. 

Replying to E. R. Wilson's request, in 
December Recreation, will say: 

About 7 years ago I bought an Ithaca 
hammer gun, $35 list. It was built like a 
race horse, and a friend of mine, to whom 
I loaned it, said, " That gun shoots like a 
cannon." 

My continued boasting of my gun caused 
several others to buy Ithacas. At that 
time I think there were but 3 in town. 
Now there are 34. Later I sold the ham- 
mer gun, bought a $50 hammerless and 
was not disappointed. I made some great 
shots with it. One was at a rabbit, sitting 
in the road. At the crack of the gun he 
collapsed. I stepped the distance and it 
was 105 steps — about 85 or 90 yards. The 
load was zA drams black powder and V/% 
ounce No. 6 shot. When cleaning him I 
found 3 shot. 

Last fall 2 of my friends were talking of 
buying new guns. I recommended the 
Ithaca; they got Ithacas and all well 
pleased. They are E. H. Rud and Gus. 
Schraishahn. I sold my gun at a profit 
and now am going to get an ejector, of 
same make. Mr. Wilson will not be sorry 
for buying an Ithaca. Coonskin. 



As a reader of your valuable magazine 
I greatly enjoy its articles, especially those 
relating to the rifle. A busy life prevent- 
ing me from hunting big game, I content 
myself with the festive woodchuck. Shots 
at such game are never at known distances, 
nor twice alike; keeping the rifleman on 
the alert at all times. 

I have used a little known repeater, 32- 
20-112, and a Winchester 25-20. Now, I am 
using a Winchester single shot, 32-40-165, 
fitted with Lyman sights front and rear, 
with a spirit level in rear sight slot. This, 
for 150 yards and upward, is quite useful, 
as with the Lyman sight, the rifle can, 
readily be brought to a level, giving a good 
vertical line shot. My experience with the 
Lyman sight, for over 12 years, puts it 
much ahead of any device I have seen, for 
all around shooting. For quick work, the 
large aperture is best, and with it I often 
shoot hawks and crows on the wing; al- 
though I am not an expert shooter, just 
an everyday marksman, who used the old 
Springfield in the war. 

Would like to hear from some brother 
woodchuck fiend, through your columns. 
M. B. Aldrich, Binghamton, N. Y. 



The Winchester is the best rifle made, for 
all around use. I own 2, a 44 and a 30-30. 
The latter, I have not tried on game, but its 
work, at short target range, is satisfactory. 
For easy target practice, from 100 yards 
down to 35, I prefer a 44 or 38, and have 
tried them against all others. I load all my 



shells, and with any kind of good black 
powder, get better results than from factory 
loads. I send you 2 targets, 5 straight 
shots at each, that I made at 35 yards on 
September 6.* I am not a long range 
shooter. I think it wise to learn to shoot 
well at short range, and then increase the 
distance according to your progress. I 
would like to hear from some short-range 
shooters of the 30-30 or 25-36. 

J. E. H., Renwood, Pa. 



I read Recreation, and am much 
pleased with it. It is by far the best maga- 
zine of the kind I ever saw. I am some- 
thing of a rifle shot, and have made some 
fair targets, shooting at 200 yards, with 
muzzle rest. Targets range from 6^4 to 8^2 
inches string measure, 10 shots each. 
These were not shot in a match, but I have 
witnesses to all of them. Of course there 
are a great many crack shots, who are far 
better than I; but with my one year's ex- 
perience I think my shooting quite good. 
My gun was made by William Lewis, of 
this place, and my telescope sight, by D. H. 
Darling, of Guilford, N. Y. My gun is a 
46 calibre muzzle loader, using patch and 
cast ball. 

Lee Armstrong, New Berlin, N. Y. 



Mr. J. J. Adams has no faith in the 30 
calibre rifle, and does not believe any man 
would willingly face a grizzly, with one. 
If he would read Mr. W. E. Carlin's article 
in January, '97, Recreation, he would 
learn what can be done with one of these 
" pop-guns." Mr. Adams thinks a 30 
calibre all right for deer. There again he 
is mistaken — that is, if ht wishes to eat the 
venison. If he would try a 45-90, and a 
30-40, with soft nosed bullets, he would be 
convinced that the latter is the more pow- 
erful gun. 

G. E. Lucas, Hartford, Conn. 



We have recently organized a gun club, 
in our town. In honor of your highly in- 
teresting and instructive magazine, we 
have named it Recreation Gun Club. 

We would like to hear, through the col- 
umns of Recreation, of the comparative 
shooting power and range, of the 10 and 
the 12 bore. 
R. H. Tewksbury, Sec, Winthrop, Mass. 

I thank you and your friends, most cor- 
dially for this honor and have ordered a 
flag sent you, with proper inscription. — 
Editor. 



In reading the September number of 
your magazine, I saw an article concerning 
the Marlin rifle. I own one, and like it 

* The targets are excellent. — Editor^ 



148 



RECREA TION. 



very much. It is a 45-70, with a 24 inch 
barrel. What advantage is gained by using 
a 28 inch barrel, instead of a 26 inch? That 
is, does it shoot any stronger than the 26 
inch barrel? 

I take Recreation and find but one 
fault — that it comes only once a month. 
K. H. Shaw, Kansas City, Kan. 



I will give R. B. B., St. Louis, Mo., my 
experience with a Lyman rear sight. 
About 10 years ago I began using the Ly- 
man sights. At first, I used the open rear 
sight, with the Lyman rear sight; but 
found I could not do as good work as I 
wished.' I then removed the open sight, 
and have not used one since. Most of my 
guns are made to order, without any slot 
for a middle sight. I would advise shoot- 
ers to take out the middle sight, for a time 
at least; then they' will leave it out for all 
time. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, Mont. 



Is the 30-40 cartridge worth the differ- 
ence in cost over the 30-30, or is the latter 
powerful enough for large game? 

I would also like to hear which is the 
best finish for a revolver; blued or nick- 
eled. I carried a cheap one out in the 
woods to practice with, one day, and when 
I returned that evening, much of the blue- 
ing was gone, and there were even signs of 
rust. This, however, can hardly be taken 
as evidence against a high grade revolver 
with that finish. 

J. A. Close, Stamford, Conn. 



Mr. David I. Shafer of Covington, O., 
asks, in October issue, if the Remington 
shot gun will stand common charges of 
nitro powder. 

Having used one of these guns, with all 
kinds of charges, I can recommend them to 
shoot nitro powder as well as any gun on 
the market. I am now shooting one of 
their semi-hammerless guns and it makes 
the best target of any gun in this vicinity. 
The Remington is all right, Mr. Shafer, 
and will please you if you get one. 

Dan Wogaman, Quincy, O. 



In shooting a rifle, most sportsmen use 
the index finger to pull the trigger. If your 
readers would try using the second finger, 
and squeezing the hand together, instead 
of a direct pull, they would find a great dif- 
ference in the pull of the trigger. This 
method is of great advantage when one has 
a standing shot at deer, as one is less liable 
to pull off. 

C. S. Handcock, Pearmond, Mont. 



load in common paper shells, such as the 
Winchester Rival, shall I put in enough 
wads to fill the shell to where it is crimped, 
or use only 2 wads over powder, and one 
over shot? 

Will nitro powder give satisfactory re- 
sults in New Rival, Blue Rival or Rival 
shells, using Winchester No. 2 primers? 
W. B. Cuckler, Athens, O. 



I see in September Recreation, that 
Mr. Latham does not believe a gun will 
kill game at 127 yards with No. 1 shot. 
Last fall I brought a goose down at 165 
yards, but used triple O shot. Geese are 
plentiful here, but I cannot get a load 
that will kill them regularly. I hit them 
hard, yet they jump up and go on. I have 
tried all sizes of shot. Would like some 
one to give a good load for killing geese. 
C. G. Lindquist, Corona, S. D. 



Answering J. V.'s inquiry as to the best 
rifle for shooting the 22 calibre cartridge: 
I am strongly in favor of the Stevens' rifles. 
I know, from several years' use of their 
different styles, they will do wonderful 
work with these tiny cartridges. I am 
waiting for some manufacturer to bring out 
a take-down 22 repeater, to pack in a case, 
the shape of which shall not suggest its 
contents. Moody. 



I think the Savage is the finest rifle I ever 
saw, especially so as to the magazine. I do 
not agree with Mr. G. L. Lehle about the 
penetration of the 30 calibre. My experi- 
ence is that a tree that will stop the 45-70 
bullet will stop the 30. 

I do not think any one class of rifles has 
been so sadly misrepresented as the 30 
calibre. 

P. J. Bowker, Wakefield, Mass. 



I would like to hear from some one re- 
garding the 30-30 Winchester with black 
powder and lead bullet. What is thought 
of the 30-30 with smokeless powder and 
steel ball, as compared with the 40-82 with 
black powder, as to killing power and 
penetration? Does the soft nose bullet 
bleed an animal as well as the 40-82? Will 
some one who has tried this please answer. 
P. K. Dugan, Redlands, Cal. 



I would like information regarding the 
loading of paper shot shells. For a small 



I have just bought a Marlin 32-40 smoke- 
less. I think it the neatest and most ac- 
curate rifle I ever shot, and have used most 
kinds. I would like to ask readers of Rec- 
ur att on if they ever shot smokeless in a 
Marlin 40-60 and with what result? Rec- 
reation is just what we sportsmen want. 
A. J. Stover, Majors, Neb. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



THE FLIGHT OF THE FLYING SQUIRREL. 



FREDERICK H. BELCHER. 



A SNAKE AND A RAT. 



W. H. GADDISS. 



Quite recently I have been furnished 
with a key to a mystery regarding the fly- 
ing squirrel, which has puzzled me for 
more than 40 years. 

When I was a boy, I once brought home 
a nest of flying squirrels, and having no 
cage convenient, I put them temporarily 
in an unoccupied room. For some time 
they thrived, and became very tame; but 
one day upon visiting the room I missed 
my pets altogether. At last, however, I 
found them in a bag of herbs that was 
hanging against the wall on one side of the 
room. 

The bag was higher than any other point 
to which the squirrels could climb and 
descend to it, and knowing well their mode 
of sailing from one place to another, I was 
puzzled to understand how they managed 
to get to it. Now, after the lapse of so 
many years, I have found an explanation 
of the mystery. 

Along the sidewalk in front of my house, 
in Irvington, N. Y., and about 40 feet away, 
there are 3 large elm trees, under which 
there is an incandescent light. Frequently, 
while seated on the porch, during the warm 
summer evenings, I have noticed what I 
supposed were sparrows flitting from one 
tree to another, attracted, as I thought, by 
the light. Presently, however, I thought 
they resembled flying squirrels, from the 
way they would sometimes alight on the 
trunk of a tree and then run up to the 
branches. Yet I had never seen a flying 
squirrel even attempt to fly by flapping its 
(so-called) wings, like a bird. As a rule, 
they sail from the top of one tree to the 
base of another, perhaps 50 yards away, 
using the membrane between their fore 
and hind legs as a parachute. Now, how- 
ever, I know they can and do fly up, a 
short distance, in the same manner as a 
bird. 

I tried to get near enough to see dis- 
tinctly, but the little creatures would alight 
in the shadow; and I could not tell, posi- 
tively, what they were until finally I 
brought my shot gun, and a friend killed 
one, at the first shot. They were flying 
squirrels! There must have been a dozen 
of them flying among the trees. They 
would sail down from some distant tree, 
under the low-hanging branches of the 
elms, and then, by quickly flapping their 
wings, would raise and alight quite high on 
the^ trunk or larger branches. Owing to 
their nocturnal habits they are seldom seen 
in their natural state by ordinary observers, 
although as pets they are quite common. 



During a temporary residence in Florida, 
last summer, 1 saw a most grewsome illus- 
tration of the principle that in order that 
life may exist life must be taken. One 
evening as I sat in a cabin, on Cape Can- 
averal, I heard a sudden rap beneath the 
floor, and, almost simultaneously the 
squealing of a rat, in distress. I wondered 
what calamity had overtaken the rat and 
peeped under the house, which stood on 
blocks some 2 feet above the ground. 

Within 3 feet of me was a coach whip 
snake, Flagelli formis, about 3^2 feet long, 
with a large rat in his coils. He had coiled 
twice around his victim, just in front of its 
hind legs, and was holding it on its back in 
a most helpless position. In throwing its 
loops around the rat it left its head and 
some 16 inches of its body free, which he 
kept swaying about in graceful curves, now 
and then bringing his head near that of the 
rat, in a most affectionate way, as much as 
to say, " I know it hurts old fellow, but 
don't cry." 

The snake seemed in no hurry for his 
victim to die. His movements, were delib- 
erate, and he paid no attention to me, 
though I stood in plain sight. I could see 
the cruel coils slowly tighten. Gradually 
the poor rat changed his pitiful cry to more 
pitiful sobs. These lasted but a few sec- 
onds when his muscles relaxed, his head 
dropped back and he was dead. 

The snake grasped the rat by the throat, 
and I could see the muscles of his neck 
swell from the exertion of his grip. He 
held on so long I thought he had cut the 
jugular and was drawing out the blood; 
but later discovered he was only making 
sure that life was extinct. 

Knowing that snakes insist on swallow- 
ing the whole carcass or none I was curious 
to know what he would do with his present 
victim. It seemed impossible for him to 
swallow this rat, which was 3 times as 
big as he was. The snake was of consider- 
able length but was very slim. His neck 
was not more than §4 of an inch thick and 
his head was not over Y\ of an inch in 
width, at the base. 

However, I soon found I had underesti- 
mated the snake's power of gulping. When 
' he began to stretch his little narrow head 
over the rat's nose I thought it one of the 
greatest undertakings I had ever seen, and 
made up my mind that if he succeeded I 
would hereafter believe all the snake stories 
I might hear. I took out my watch. It 
wanted 10 minutes of 5. I brought out a 
stool and the book I was reading, prepara- 



H9 



*5 



RECREA TION. 



tory to watching the tragical gormandiz- 
ing feat to the end. 

The head of the rat soon disappeared, 
and the snake still had plenty of mouth 
room, for he opened his jaws wide enough 
to reach over the forelegs, that stood out 
from the body, and to crush them down 
with ease. The snake's neck and body be- 
came greatly inflated, for several inches, 
and when he advanced with his mouth as 
far as possible he would close it, firmly, 
and the muscles of the back would stiffen 
in a sinuous line, to push the throat that 
now seemed stretched to almost a burst- 
ing tension, ahead so he could again ad- 
vance with his mouth. 

When he reached the coils, which he still 
retained around his victim, he moved them 
back across the rat's hips, and used them 
to hold the body steady as long as he had 
room. When he had to relinquish their 
use altogether his task became preceptibly 
more difficult, and he had to stop, occa- 
sionly, to rest. At last the rump disap- 
peared and the hind feet soon followed 
from view. I again consulted my watch 
and found he had been just one hour and 
17 minutes. 

He now showed his first annoyance at 
my presence, and began to sneak away, tail 
first, into the darkness. To see that snake 
squirming backward, dragging his help- 
less, distorted neck, with his shiny head 
closed over a rat's tail, was the most repul- 
sive sight I ever witnessed. Possibly the 
reader may ask why I watched him? Well, 
I was betting with myself that the snake 
could not swallow the rat; but I lost the 
bet. 



ANOTHER DOSE OF DOPE. 

Crevasse, Mont. 

Editor Recreation: Mr. Thompson's 
article on the doping habit, in wolves and 
dogs, recalls the following incidents: 

At a house party on the Hudson, many 
years ago, a lady from the city had with 
her a diminutive terrier; blue-blooded, be- 
curled and be-ribboned, and, I might add, 

be-d d by several of the men, who fain 

would have engaged the attention, if not 
the affections of the mistress, for she was 
passing fair. But she doted on the purp 
and would none of us. 

Sauntering one day through the wooded 
lanes of Cornwall the odor of some animal, 
in an advanced stage of decomposition, 
held us speechless, if not breathless. The 
terrier, however, as soon as he winded the 
cause of our discomfort, went for it; and 
ere his mistress could stay him, rolled 
heartily in the reeking filth. 

How do you account for it? Was it 
heredity? Surely no stronger odors than 
those of his perfumed bath had ever before 
reached his delicate nostrils. 



In the early 70's the break-up of the great 
migratory buffalo herd, and the hundreds 
of thousands of carcasses left by the hide 
hunters brought together, between the 
Arkansas and Platte rivers, countless num- 
bers of coyotes and gray wolves, many of 
whom were poisoned by Mexican and 
other trappers. Sitting one day on top of 
a butte, West of the Purgatoire river, I 
saw a coyote rolling around at the bottom 
of a small arroyo. He would roll on one 
spot, then go to another a few feet distant. 
This he did several times, and in such man- 
ner as, led me to believe he had been doped. 
On my return to camp I passed the spot, 
expecting to find him dead, and was as- 
tonished to see that he had been rolling 
on a buffalo carcass, and then on a small 
patch of buffalo grass. A closer examina- 
tion, the following day, showed that others 
of his kind had also been there. 

During the past summer I killed, at my 
cabin door, a skunk, and buried it some 
distance away. About 2 weeks later there 
came a strong odor, from that direction, 
and on investigation I found the flattened 
carcass some 20 feet from where it had 
been interred. A day or 2 later a young 
Llewellyn of mine came to the house, 
strongly impregnated with the mephitic 
odor. She had been with me before, when 
I had killed and buried these animals, but 
had never disturbed them. This one had, 
no doubt, been resurrected by a coyote, a 
fox, or a porcupine. J. W. H. 



CANADA JAY {PERISOREUS CANADENSIS). 

This tame " hanger on " to a hunter's or 
lumberman's camp, is found throughout the 
Northern parts of Canada, in Maine and 
Minnesota, and up to the Arctic- circle in 
the intervening territory. 

Naturalists sometimes divide it into 2 
sub-species. The Western variety, rather 
less in size and of slightly different colora- 
tion, is put under the name of Perisoreus 
canadensis var. Capitalis (rocky mountain 
jay), while the Labrador, from being some- 
what darker than the others, is called Peri- 
soreus canadensis var. Obscurus (gray jay — 
dusky Canada jay). 

His local assortment of names is varied. 
Among them I mention whiskey jack (a 
slang corruption of his Indian name " wis- 
ka-jhan ") moose bird, caribou bird, meat 
bird, camp bird, and camp robber. 

To all of these his habits will cause him 
to lay claim, but his principal failing is an 
acquired habit of helping himself to what- 
ever you have in the eating line, and it will 
not be long after you have your tent up 
or camp built, before these birds will find 
you. 

Your first acquaintance with them, per- 
haps, will be in seeing a pair perched on a 
convenient branch silently watching your 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



151 



operations. Leave the place a minute, or 
even turn your back, and you will find them 
at your camp luggage, seeking what they 
may devour. Scare them off and they re- 
sume their former station, with a scornful 
" Ca-ca-ca." 

As the days pass on, they become more 
familiar, until I have had them light on the 
table, snatch the handiest piece from my 
plate, and fly away. It is then you are apt 
to say " cuss words," pick up the handiest 
shooting iron and let drive. 

They hoard whatever is not eaten at the 
time, hiding it between layers of bark, and 
in other convenient places. 

There is nothing seemingly that they will 
not steal or eat — soap, raw meat, candles, 
salt pork; even a pair of my old trousers 
that had become greasey, they pecked 
holes in. They are industrious but thiev- 
ish, and in the latter connection exhibit the 
jay nature continually; even extending the 
crime to robbing nests of other birds of 
their eggs and young. When the snow 
covers the ground the gray jay must suffer 
extreme want. 

The nesting commences very early, and 
the young are hatched before many other 
birds begin their mating. The nest is large, 
a roughly made exterior, but lined with fine 
mosses, and sometimes feathers. 

John Boyd, Toronto, Can. 



HOW MUCH DOES THE LARGEST MOOSE 
WEIGH ? 

Can you tell me the weight of the largest 
moose of which there is an authentic 
record. Also the spread of the largest 
antlers; and state where the moose was 
killed. 

I asked this question of another sports- 
men's paper but as yet have never seen it 
answered. 

F. R. Whitcher, Amesbury, Mass. 

It is difficult to give any reliable data as 
to the actual weight of moose. As a rule 
they are killed in the wilderness, at long 
distances from towns or settlements, and 
where it is practically impossible to get 
them out, whole. Few hunters ever carry 
with them large scales, with which to 
Weigh such game, even by cutting it up. 
I have but one record as to the actual gross 
weight of a bull moose. This was killed 
by Mr. M. L. Miller, of Bangor, Me., in 
the fall of '93, and the story of the killing 
and getting the moose out of the woods, 
was published in March, '95, Recreation. 
Mr. Miller states, in his article, the moose 
actually weighed 1,123 pounds. 

In the March, '97, number of Recrea- 
tion, a moose head, then owned by Mr. W. 
W. Hart, taxidermist of this city, was de- 
scribed, the spread of horns being 5 feet 
10% inches. 



Without a doubt the horns of the moose 
found in the vicinity of Cook's Inlet, 
Alaska, grow larger than those found else- 
where on this continent. 

If any reader of Recreation knows of a 
large moose having been actually weighed, 
and the weight verified and recorded in 
the presence of witnesses, I should like to 
have a report from him. It is useless to 
use up space in telling of big moose, the 
weight of which was " estimated " to be 
so and so. This is not competent testi- 
mony. We want only facts, not guesses. 



A BIG MOOSE HEAD. 

I send you herewith photograph and di- 
mensions of a moose I killed in Alaska, in 
September last.* 

From edge of upper lip down 
over the back, to toe of hind 
foot 16 ft. 4 in. 

Height at withers 7 ft. 8 in. 

Girth, from brisket over with- 
ers . . 8 ft. 9 in. 

Girth around neck, at shoul- 
ders 6 ft. 7 in. 

Tip to tip of ears 23 Z A in. 

Width of ears 7 in. 

Around muzzle 28 in. 

antlers. 

Length of each beam, inside 
measurement 48 in. 

Around burr 141^ in. 

Around beams, at smallest 
place 10 in. 

Width of palmations 15 in. 

Extreme spread 69 in. 

Number of points 32 

The above are exact measurements. All 
points considered I believe this to be a 
record head. 

I killed a grizzly bear, the same day, that 
measured 10 feet 7 inches, stretched. The 
head was 22 inches long and 46 inches in 
circumference; foot 8 x 12 inches; claws 4 
inches long. I brought both specimens 
home and am having them mounted, at 
Colorado Springs, where they can be seen 
and measured. Who can beat them? 

Dall De Weese, Canyon City, Col. 



NOTES. 



Like Mr. Pleas, I noticed in the June 
number of Recreation the mistake of Mr. 
Gaines, regarding the color of the egg of 
the brow T n thrush. Mr. Gaines has con- 
fused the wood thrush (Turdus mustelinus) 
with the brown thrush (Harporhynchus 
rufus). From the description he gave I 
think the egg he found was that of the 
wood thrush, a bird which is bright tawny 
above, shading into olive on rump and tail, 

* See cut on front cover. 



^5* 



RECREA TION. 



beneath white except on throat and belly, 
marked with large, distinct spots of dusky. 
The eggs of this species are of a deep 
greenish blue color, and are 3 or 4 in 
number. 

The eggs of the brown thrush are 4 or 5 
in number, with a ground color varying 
from white to light blue, thickly and uni- 
formly speckled with reddish brown. 

It is a very easy matter to mistake the 
wood thrush for the brown thrush. When 
seen in flight, the easiest way to distinguish 
between them is by noting the length of 
the tail, which in the brown thrush is much 
greater than in the other. 

C. S. Scribner, Canton, O. 



Seeing in November Recreation that 
you have called attention to the eyes of ani- 
mals, I should like to ask if you have ever 
seen an instance of a snake apparently 
charming, or otherwise exerting any mys- 
terious influence over a bird, or other an- 
imal. 

Frank G. Speck, Jr., Hackensack, N. J. 

Answer. — There is scarcely room to 
question the well-established fact that in 
the presence of serpents about to attack, 
birds are subject to the same paralysis of 
fear to which many animals, and even man 
himself, are subject. Indeed, no wild 
species is any more subject to the benumb- 
ing influence of terror than is the lord of 
creation. It is probable that quite as many 
human beings have lost their lives through 
excess of fear as have birds through, the 
so-called " fascination " of serpents. It 
would be an easy matter to elicit number- 
less instances of fear paralysis in animals; 
but they would be only so much additional 
evidence in support of facts already well 
established. 



Dr. H. L. Ross states, in November 
Recreation, that he raised 41 young 
pheasants out of 45 hatched. This breaks 
the record, and I would be glad to know 
how it was done. I have been raising 
pheasants for many years, and with fair 
success. If I raise 75 per cent., I think I 
am doing more than well, and if l / 2 the 
birds hatched, reach maturity, I am satis- 
fied. 

Recreation is delightful, and constantly 
improves. We are not much troubled by 
the game hog. The shooting is mostly 
done by sportsmen who know when they 
have enough. The quail crop in Western 
Ontario, this season, is better than for 
some years past. This, I think, is owing 
to the mild winter of last year. Early 
broods were much hurt by the wet weather 
in May and June. Even now, many of the 
coveys are not fully matured. Ruffed 
grouse are scarce. 

J. S. Niven, London, Ont 



The article in December Recreation as 
to what has become of the passenger 
pigeon (E. Migratorius) has appealed to 
me as a subject of unusual interest; and on 
turning to notes and records of my cabinet 
I find that on May 20, 1893, a fine male 
specimen of the wood pigeon was killed 
inside of our city limits. I procured it and 
have it in my collection. 

Again, in October, '96, I met a boy who 
had shot a bird he did not know. It proved 
to be a fine male specimen of pigeon. Dur- 
ing the same month a bunch of about 30 
birds was near my home, and although I 
did not see them, I am satisfied the men 
who did were not mistaken. 

E. F. Steinhauer, Vandalia, 111. 



I read Mr. Waterloo's article on the wild 
pigeon, in December Recreation, and will 
give you a bit of news as to this bird. In 
July last a small flock of passenger pigeons 
made their appearance in this town, and lit 
on a pine tree close to one of the stores; 
but only stopped a few minutes — not long 
enough to be shot at. One man who saw 
them light went for his gun, but they were 
gone when he came back. 

This is the first flock of pigeons I ever 
saw in the mountains. There were about 
a dozen of them and they were the first I 
have seen since the 70s. 

M. P. Dunham, Ovando, Mont. 



In the last number of Recreation, I 
saw an article, from Mr. MacCurdy, of 
Fresno, Cal., about jack rabbits swimming. 
While out hunting in the Santa Anna wash, 
a short time ago, I saw 2 rabbits swim 
across a place about 40 feet wide. One was 
in a very swift place and the jack was 
taken under 4 times, and carried down 
about 25 yards, in crossing. He seemed to 
be about played out, but on landing gave 
himself a shake, and ran off into the brush. 
P. K. Dugan, Redlands, Cal. 



I have read, with deep interest, the ac- 
counts given in Recreation relating to 
record coons, and many of us derived a 
good deal of amusement from these state- 
ments. It would now be interesting to do 
the same as to the woodchuck. Personally 
I have not had the pleasure of shooting 
any record breakers; but will start the ball 
rolling at 12^4 pounds. 

P. K. Rossiter, Ithaca, N. Y. 



I should be glad to have you put me on 
the list for membership in the L. A. S. and 
will endeavor to attend the proposed con- 
vention, to be held in January. 

Walter D. Griscom. 
433 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



«53 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 

SUBSCRIPTION RECEIPTS FOR 3 
YEARS. 

Read the deadly parallel columns: 

1895. 1S96. 1897. 

January $379 $723 $2,146 

February 256 693 2,127 

March 300 1,049' 2,215 

April 342 645 i ,92 1 

May 292 902 1,596 

June 507 770 1 ,402 

July 345 563 1,101 

August 306 601 1 ,906 

September 498 951 2,223 

October 438 969 2,586 

November 586 1,054 2,440 

December 652 1,853 4,760 

$4,671 $10,773 $26,423 

Do you realize what these figures mean? 
They mean that Recreation has achieved 
a greater success than has ever been real- 
ized by any other sportsmen's journal in 
the world. 

Do you see the footing of. that right hand 
column? Do you realize that Recreation 
has taken more subscriptions in the past 
year, alone, than any other journal of its 
class ever had on its books, at one time? 
Are you aware that I took more subscrip- 
tions in December, alone, than any other 
sportsmen's paper has on its books to-day? 
Well, these are facts, and if any man 
doubts any one of them let him say so and 
I will produce the letters in which all these 
26,423 subscriptions came. 

What is the reason of this phenomenal 
growth? Read Recreation and you will 
soon find out. 

Beginning with the March number I 
shall institute a fourth parallel column. 
Watch it, all through the year '98, and see 
if it does not show a gain of at least 100 per 
cent, each month, over the corresponding 
month of '97. 

By December 31, '98, I will show you a 
total paid circulation of at least 100,000! 
Watch the returns and see. 



Read Mr. Carlin's article, in this issue, 
on " Hunting with a Carpera," and the 
next opportunity you get, go and do like- 
wise. How much greater pleasure a true 
sportsman can have in studying and pho- 
tographing the beautiful creatures of the 
woods and the mountains, than in killing 
them, as is the custom of so many thought- 
less and reckless hunters. 

I do not mean tc condemn the killing of 



game, entirely; but to caution my readers 
against the insatiate desire for wholesale 
slaughter that is so grievously common. 
Many men and boys think they must shoot 
at every living thing they see in the woods, 
no matter what it may be. This is a crime 
against nature. If you have no valid use 
for an animal, or a bird, why kill it? 

I hope to see the time when no man will 
think of killing anything not actually need- 
ed for camp use, or for his family, even 
though he may be in a region that is full of 
game. Moderation is commendable, in all 
things, and in nothing more than in hunt- 
ing and fishing. 



A great many of my friends, in renewing 
their subscriptions, send also one or more 
new subscriptions, with theirs. It is im- 
possible to write personal letters to all 
such; but I want to say here that I thor- 
oughly appreciate this generous action on 
your part. It is not my fault that Recre- 
ation has made the phenomenal success it 
has, by any means. It is due largely to the 
cordial co-operation and assistance of my 
friends; and if they will kindly aid me in 
the future, as in the past, I shall in time 
be able to double the size of the magazine, 
and to double its circulation several times. 
That means, of course, a proportionate in- 
crease in its power for good. 



A friend sent me, as a Christmas present, 
a bronze paper weight in the form 4 of a 
mouse, bearing this unique inscription: 

The Lord of Creation you see in this brass. 
No? Man, you maintain, is the head. 
Yet who rules o'er man? It is woman I 

guess, 
And a mouse fills a woman with dread. 
So it thus becomes clear, as the mud in the 

street, 
And it's granted in each advanced nation; 
The mouse, being the boss of the boss of 

the boss. 
Must be easily the head of Creation. 



A large number of clubs have been 
named in honor of Recreation. These 
are gun clubs, rifle clubs, canoe clubs, 
bicycle clubs, etc. They are scattered over 
the various states and territories, so that 
Recreation's flag is kissing the breezes 
from Maine to California and from Florida 
to Alaska. 

It is safe to say no other sportsmen's 
journal has ever been so widely and so 
generally honored, in this way. The rea- 
son is that no other periodical of this class 
has ever been so widely read and so truly 
loved, by sportsmen, as Recreation is. 



The March number of Recreation will 
be as good as any of the others that have 



154 



RECREA TION. 



preceded it. Among the evidences of this 
fact, I may cite the following titles of ar- 
ticles to appear in that issue: " Our Visi- 
tor's Bear Story," E. L. Kellogg; " An 
Elk Hunt," J. B. Jennett (Old Silver Tip) ; 
"A Night's Bassing," F. L. Davis; "Tur- 
key Shooting," J. W. Prather, and other 
stories of equal interest. 

The departments will be as large and as 
rich in information as usual. 



Two of the game hogs whom I have 
roasted, in recent issues of Recreation, 
have threatened me with libel suits. I hope 
these critters will go ahead and bring their 
suits. It would be interesting to know 
whether or not a hog has any rights under 
the laws of New York, or of other states. 
If so, it would be a novelty to see a biped 
swine in court. However this may be, 
there are plenty of lawyers who are look- 
ing for business and who would, no doubt, 
be glad to take the cases of the aforesaid 
grunters. v 



The index to Vol. VII. is now complete 
and ready for mailing. If you have not 
received a copy, let me know and I will 
send you one. 



The constant drop of water wears away the 

hardest stone; 
The constant gnaw of Towser masticates 

the toughest bone; 
The constant wooing lover carries off the 

blushing maid; 
The constant advertiser is the one who 

gets the trade. 



Professor D. Lange, of the Central 
High School, St. Paul, writes, " Let us 
have more hunting with the camera and 
less with the rifle." 

This is a noble sentiment and one which 
I am glad to see gr6wing, daily, through- 
out the country. 



Will some lover of dogs tell me how to 
teach a collie dog, 6 months old, some 
tricks? I believe there are many tricks, 
and methods of teaching same, which are 
not found in any books, and which can be 
had in no other way. I would be greatly 
obliged to any one who would communi- 
cate with me, direct. 

Paul J. Lee, Huntington, W. Va. 



" You are still wearing bird-wings in 
your hat, Nancy." 

" Yes; I didn't want to be the first wom- 
an to act superior to the rest of the sex." 



With hauteur my neighbor now speeds — 
My lawn mower's high on the shelf; 

For if a snow shovel he needs. 

He knows he can make one himself. 



1 THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN 
SPORTSMEN. 

I am heartily in favor of a League of 
American Sportsmen, and the idea meets 
the approval of every sportsman I have 
spoken to on the subject. All true sports- 
men are in favor of anything looking to- 
ward the protection of the remnant of our 
game. Now that Recreation has taken 
hold of the matter, the League is an as- 
sured fact. My confidence in that maga- 
zine is unbounded, and I want to see these 
two planks nailed fast, right in the centre 
of the platform: " Stop the sale of game," 
and " Penitentiary the game and fish 
hogs." 

I have confidence in the good common 
sense of the American people, when they 
can be made to think. They are beginning 
to think now. The market shooter and 
the swine must go. I have some respect 
for the market hunter, but none whatever 
for the hog. I know men (swine) who call 
themselves sportsmen, and who would be, 
or would pretend to be, insulted if asked 
to sell some of their unreasonable bag or 
catch. Yet these same sportsmen (?) both 
steal and rob. They shoot and fish, in sea- 
son and out of season, regardless of the 
rights of others and of the state at large. 
They openly rob during the open season, 
and stealthily rob in the closed season. 

Yet in Northwest Missouri, and prob- 
ably in most other sections, it is the market 
shooters that kill most of the game. I 
know 3 market hunters, living in a neigh- 
boring town, who, according to their own 
statements, killed, in one year, nearly 3,000 
ducks, 500 quails, 100 . prairie chickens, 
1,000 plover, 300 squirrels and about 100 
head of miscellaneous game — 5,000 head in 
all. Of the genuine sportsmen living in 
the same town, of whom there are about a 
dozen, the combined bags, for the same 
year, would not exceed 300 head of game. 

What is a reasonable bag? Well, for this 
locality 10 to 12 ducks, 6 to 8 quails, 5 to 7 
squirrels, 3 to 5 prairie chickens, 15 to 20 
plover, 5 to 8 black bass, or 25 crappies. 

But to return to the L. A. S. ; Recrea- 
tion shall be its official organ. Who can 
doubt the influence of the League for the 
protection of game, with such a journal 
read by all its members? I suggest an ap- 
propriate emblem or pin to be worn by its 
members, not because it will be a secret 
society, but because it will not be a secret 
society. 

Success to the L. A. S. and, above all, 
success to Recreation. 

U. W. Gallaher, Rock Port, Mo. 



I have read, with deep interest, the let- 
ters published in Recreation, in favor of 
a League of American Sportsmen. Am 
glad the proposition has met with so much 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



155 



approval and that a convention of sports- 
men, to perfect an organization, is soon 
to be held. 

A special effort should be made to obtain 
country membership, as one man in the 
country can do more for the protection of 
game than 6 men who live in town. The 
men who live near the game are the ones 
who will most likely know when it is being 
intruded on. Here where I live, within 6 
miles of Louisville, there was a better pros- 
pect for good shooting, last summer, than 
for many years past. I could sit at my 
door and hear the familiar " Bob White " 
from at least 6 different coveys of birds. 
About 2 weeks before the close season ex- 
pired some game hogs, from the city, be- 
gan coming here, and by the time the legal 
season opened only a few fragments of 
coveys remained. 

What could any number of city men have 
done to protect these birds? Yet a few 
good men, living in the neighborhood, 
could have driven these hogs from the 
field. They were evidently from the city. 
They were unknown to those who saw 
them, were careful not to give their names, 
and as no one in the neighborhood felt it 
his especial duty to follow them into the 
city and find out who they were, they es- 
caped unpunished. I am heartily in favor 
of organizing those who believe in the pro- 
tection of our game, under any name that 
will best serve the purpose, and let special 
efforts be made to interest and enroll the 
farmers. Once get them aroused to the 
necessity of preserving our game from the 
game hogs and the problem will be nearly 
solved. Organize under such name, and 
with such a constitution and laws as will 
interest the greatest number of country 
people, is my advice. 

J. W. Durham, Lockland, Ky. 

And mighty good advice it is, too. — 
Editor. 



I am greatly in favor of a L. A. S., and 
will do all in my power to help its growth. 
I will gladly join it and follow its rules. 

A few weeks ago a nitro-glycerine fac- 
tory emptied a lot of ammonia, and other 
acids, in a small creek that empties into the 
Blanchard river, above this city, and it 
killed a great many fine fish. The river, 
which flows through the centre of this city, 
was covered with dead and dying bass, 
weighing J / 2 pound to 2.y 2 and 3 pounds. A 
great many people went in the water and 
caught buckets full of fine bass, but they 
were not fit to eat. 

Such destruction of fish should be looked 
into by the State officers and should not be 
permitted. Several years ago the brewery 
here emptied some of its waste into the 
river and killed hundreds of fish; but the 
city authorities stopped them and there has 



been no cause to complain until the in- 
stance mentioned. 

I read Recreation every month and 
there is not another sportsmen's journal 
that approaches it in interest and value. 
Am only sorry it don't come every week. 
H. A. Barnd, Findlay, Ohio. 



By all means put me down as a member 
of the L. A. S. I can't go to New York, in 
response to your call, but I want to be in 
it, right from the start. I want to be one 
of the charter members. I am a full blood- 
ed white American, a voter, a rooter for 
Recreation and the L. A. S. and, of 
course, that means a full blooded, double- 
geared sportsman, who will do everything 
in his power to protect American game 
from slaughter by hogs, pot hunters and 
butchers. When the time comes draw on 
me, through the First Nat. Bank, of this 
city, for my entrance fee. Keep up the 

good work. Give the hogs h . 

F. G. Flower, Box 1218, Butte, Mont. 



I am in favor of a L. A. S., as suggested 
by Mr. Lydecker. The time is ripe for just 
such a movement and I feel confident it 
will succeed. Last evening while reading 
Recreation my brother called to see me, 
and when I told him about it he became 
deeply interested. I have secured his sub- 
scription for Recreation in order that he 
may keep in touch with the League. I shall 
certainly attend the first meeting, and 
bring as many brother sportsmen with me 
as possible. William H. Picken, 

61 W. 113th st., N. Y. 



Am thoroughly in sympathy with the 
movement for a L. A. S. and hope to at- 
tend the convention. 

Frank L. Wilcox, Asbury Park, N. J. 



I am heartily in favor of the L. A. S. 
Count me in. 

G. H. Gregg, Moravia, N. Y. 



A large number of other letters on this 
subject, equally important and interesting, 
are crowded out for want of space. — 
Editor. 



I have just finished reading " Hunting 
in the Great West," and, like all other 
books of yours which I have read, it is 
exceedingly interesting and instructive. It 
seems as if you are talking to me, and 
sometimes I almost think I am out in the 
" Big Horns," or along the gulf coast of 
Florida. 

Recreation is my choice among sports- 
men's periodicals, and I will do all I can 
for its welfare. 

P. K. Rossiter, Ithaca, N. Y. 



BICYCLING. 



ALICE AWHEEL. 



ISAAC M LELLAN. 



Dear, lovely woman! I rejoice to view 
The roseate beauties of thy lovely face, 
Thy peerless action, thy consummate skill, 
Thy bird-like swiftness, thy enchanting 

grace ! 
This healthful exercise of shapely limb 
Adds a fresh charm" to cheeks of perfect 

bloom; 
Kindles fresh brightness in thy beaming 

eyes, 
Which like stars the heavenly realms il- 
lume. 

I wonder as I view the matchless speed, 
Of the sweet damsel skimming thro' the 

air; 
As without effort, fairy-like she moves, 
A pure, seraphic phantom, 'passing fair! 
I see thee flitting on thy airy course, 
While vain the lover seeks his vows to pay; 
Thy agile fleetness oft defies his skill, 
And only thy light laughter soothes his 

way! 
And yet I view thee on the tandem wheel 
Skimming beside the chosen of thy soul; 
But then his whispers of adoring love, 
Charm the fond couple as the swift wheels 

roll. 

What wondrous charms of Nature ye be- 
hold, 
'Mid shimmering scenes that flit along the 



ways 



Ye cast swift glances o'er the bowery 
woods 

And pierce their shady depths with glanc- 
ing gaze. 

Your glances sweep the wide-extended 
bay; 

The fair Peconic, beauteous as a dream. 

Ye view the dashing yachts, the steamers 

The rippling circles of the azure stream; 
Ye see the verdurous shores of Shelter Isle, 
Fring'd with palatial Manhanset domes, 
The spires of Prospect, and the shining 

roofs 
Where city denizens find such pleasant 

homes. 

Ye skim the sandy borders of the deep 
By bay and sound, where frothy billows 

flow, 
While high above the clouds in glory 

sweep, 
Their shadows imaged in the waves below. 
All the rare scenes of earth and wave and 

air, 
The fertile fields, the orchards rich with 

fruit, 
The shaded lanes, the valley realms serene. 



Gladden your eyes in your supreme pur- 
suit. 

With speechless ecstasy, with rapturous 
zeal 

Ye view fair scenes from your revolving 
wheel; 

By country roads, and by the woodland 
side 

All Nature opes her treasures to your gaze, 

And welcomes all who bicycles may ride. 

The horse is swift, the carriage fair to see, 

But nothing swift or gorgeous may com- 
pare, 

With the bicycle, by beauty ridden, 

By graceful matron or by maiden fair! 



" We've got up a new wheel club." 

" What do you call it? " 

" The Gump club." 

" Who belong? " 

" People who couldn't learn to ride." 



PNEUMATIC HUBS. 

H. R. Collins, South Bethlehem, Pa., has 
been granted a patent for a new kind of 
bicycle. The device does away with pneu- 
matic tires and substitutes the solid tires 
which were in use before the pneumatic 
tubes were invented. 

A pneumatic tube is used in the con- 
struction of the new wheel, and plays an 
important part therein. This tube is fitted 
around the hub of the wheel, and is en- 
cased in a nickel frame, in such a manner 
as to prevent any wear and tear on the 
rubber. 

This pneumatic tube is blown up, the 
same as pneumatic tires, and the frame 
bearing on these inflated tubes does away 
with all jarring and jolting. 

The pneumatic tube in the hub is so well 
protected by the nickel casing that there 
is absolutely no wear on it; hence it can- 
not get out of order. 

The wheel tires, as stated above, are 
solid, and are not cemented to the rim, but 
are sliced on the inside so that they fit 
snugly in the grooves cut in the wooden 
rim; and once on will stay on until worn 
o'ut. The wooden rim is made of 3 kinds 
of wood, in 3 sections. 

No repair kit is necessary with this wheel 
and punctures can never occur. 

The spokes are attached to the steel rim, 
around the pneumatic tube, and are made 
of a material that can be bent and twisted. 
They are so strung to the rim as to throw 
the whole weight of the wheel and rider 
on 4 of them, which is an innovation in 
itself. 

Mr. Collins has had a machine of this 
pattern built and recently gave it a thor- 



156 



BICYCLING. 



157 



ough test in the presence of a number of 
spectators. The wheel was ridden over 
ditches, logs, rocks, glass and in other 
ways given a complete test, with the result 
that it proved in every way satisfactory. It 
is said the idea was presented to Mr. Col- 
lins as the result of a puncture. He was on 
a run and a puncture occurred when many 
miles from home. He was forced to walk, 
as his puncture kit had been left behind. 
While trudging along this new idea came 
to him and he began work on it the next 
day, with the result above related. 

It is said Gen. Nelson A. Miles, of the 
United States army, has recommended that 
10 of the wheels be ordered for the use of 
the soldiers, as an experiment. 



" I was never in the bicycle business," 
remarked the sheriff as he fixed the drop 
for the condemned bomb-thrower; "but I 
think I make a pretty good crank-hanger." 



IMPROVEMENT OF THE ROADS. 

Road improvement work, of the L. A. 
W., is being pushed with vigor along sev- 
eral distinct lines and will have the active 
attention of the committees having charge 
of that branch of league work, in the vari- 
ous state legislatures and in Congress. A 
new and hopeful impetus has been given 
the movement by the proposed establish- 
ment of postal savings banks, by the gen- 
eral Government. The urgent recom- 
mendation of Postmaster General Gary, in 
his official report, that these banks be put 
in operation in the rural counties, has led 
to the introduction of no less than 9 Con- 
gressional bills for that purpose. The 
main objection thus far urged against the 
scheme is the lack of opportunity for good 
investment of surplus deposits; and this dif- 
ficulty has suggested a provision by which, 
under proper direction and restrictions im- 
posed by the Government, the money may 
be invested in county bonds issued to ad- 
vance the work of road building, in the 
several states. 

In this way the investments, while yield- 
ing a safe and fair income to the depos- 
itors, will be employed to develop and im- 
prove the rural neighborhoods, increasing 
the value of surrounding property, and, of 
course, adding to the quality of the county 
bonds, which are at all times secure. Such 
a proposition will soon be put into one of 
the pending bills before Congress and the 
L. A. W. will give it active support. 

Meanwhile the attempt to pass good 
roads bills will be renewed in several states, 
and conspicuous among these are New 
York and Connecticut. The wheelmen will 
work again for the passage of the Higbie- 
Armstrong bill, in New York, as well as 
for other important road measures. , 

The opposition of several members of 



Assembly, to this bill, during the last 
session, was resented by the wheelmen at 
the late election, with the result that not a 
few of the old members were left at home. 
It is not hard to imagine that a repetition 
of last year's experience may, at the next 
election, change the entire political com- 
plexion of the legislature; but the officers 
of the L. A. W. appear to be generally 
confident that this winter will witness the 
passage of this much desired legislation. 

In Connecticut the chief aim of the 
sturdy worker, Chief Consul Westlake, 
seems to be the passage of a law providing 
for the raising of money for road building 
purposes by a special issue of state bonds. 
Mr. Westlake has taken up the subject 
most earnestly and is promised the active 
support and co-operation of President 
Potter, and the machinery of the national 
body of the L. A. W., in his effort to get 
the Connecticut farmers out of the mire. — 
N. Y. " Press." 



" I make my husband sleep with John- 
ny." 

"What's that for?" 

" Well — he rides his wheel so much he 
kicks all night in his sleep. Johnny kicks 
too, and so they get along together beau- 
tifully." 



The new bicycle ordinances in Washing- 
ton prescribe a bell " sufficiently distinctive 
from the bells provided for the fire depart- 
ment and ambulance service," and require 
all cycles in motion to display a light from 
one hour after sunset until one hour before 
sunrise. A vehicle turning around to the 
right has the right of way; if turning 
around to the left, the person in charge 
must see that the way is clear. A vehicle 
turning into a street on the left must leave 
sufficient space between it and the left-hand 
curb for the passage of another vehicle. 
In turning into a street on the right, it 
must keep to the right of the centre of the 
street. No vehicle shall be so directed as 
to crowd a wheelman against another 
vehicle, or against a curb or other ob- 
struction. 

Motor carriages and other vehicles in 
motion must carry lights, visible from the 
front and from both sides, during the same 
hours as cycles, except that persons bring- 
ing produce to market are exempted. 
Cyclists must not cross car tracks at inter- 
secting streets at over 6 miles an hour; nor 
cross other intersecting streets nor ride at 
over 12 miles an hour, nor ride on public 
highways outside the city at over 15 miles 
an hour. Handle bars must not have the 
grips " on a lower plane than 4 inches be- 
low the top of the saddle at its centre, and 
the rider shall, at all times, keep his head 
in such position as to command a view 
ahead of not less than 200 feet." 



158 



RECREA TION. 



Pulverized, pure graphite, mixed with 
benzine to the consistency of a very thin 
paste, and applied to the chain with a tooth 
brush, is recommended by a correspondent 
of the L. A. W. Bulletin. He says " such 
a coating will successfully resist mud and 
rain, and so far as simple dust is concerned, 
a chain so treated should require no further 
attention for at last 150 to 200 mi]es." 



" What's on the menu to-day? " asked 
the cannibal chief of the royal commissary. 

" Haven't anything but that young wom- 
an, from Boston, your royal chops." 

" Well I suppose we can worry along on 
cold shoulder, for a while," sadly observed 
the chief. 



Novice cyclists who try to keep their 
wheels in order are given some timely ad- 
vice by an Englishman. " When making 
your weekly inspection," says he, " do not 
overlook testing all nuts, bolts and screws. 
This should also be done before each long 
ride; for the loss of a single nut may cause 
a walk of many miles, or a return trip by 
train. Use a good wrench, with square 
jaws, and as soon as the jaws become 
worn or mutilated throw the wrench away 
and get a new one. Otherwise you will 
destroy the corners of the nuts and they 
cannot be securely tightened. Lock all 
bolts and nuts firmly, and with gradual 
pressure, but do not use your full strength 
or you will surely twist them apart. Keep 
the enamel free from mud and dirt and the 
nickeled parts from rust, and your bicycle 
will look fresh and new until it wears out. 

" Lack of cleaning will make a machine 
dingy and old-looking in a short time. 

" Ordinary furniture polish will keep a 
lustre on the enamel, and will also brighten 
up an old finish, dull from neglect. For 
the nickeled parts use putz-pomade, pow- 
dered pumice and water, whiting, or any of 
the standard polishes. The best way to 
remove rust is with cold water, cotton 
waste and plenty of muscle. Always wipe 
a machine dry, and polish the parts after 
riding in rain or fog. Unless you thor- 
oughly understand taking your wheel apart 
and restoring the parts properly, let a re- 
pair man do the job the first time and 
watch the operation, so that you can do it 
in the future. 

, The bearings should be removed and 
cleaned after each 500 miles, or, say, once 
a month. Soak the cones and balls in ben- 
zine, and then wipe dry. Do not use kero- 
sene for cleaning purposes, under any cir- 
cumstances. It does not evaporate, it 
causes rust, and once in the bearings will 
cut them out like fine emery. When the 
balls are placed back in the races, apply 
several drops of oil before tightening each 
cone. If you find any worn or broken 
cones, balls or races, have them replaced 
at once." 



The use of long cranks for tall riders is 
advocated by a correspondent of the L. A. 
W. Bulletin, who uses 8^-inch throw with 
116 gear, and finds this combination easier 
up-hill than 6J/2 inch cranks and y2 gear 
used last year. His idea of suitable com- 
binations is: 

Rider standing 5 ft. 10 in., 80 gear, 7^ in. cranks 

5 " n " qo " 7$ " 

4. 6 " o "■ 100 " 8 " " 

«« 6 " 1 " no '■ 8i " 

•« 6 «' 2 " 120 " 84 " 

6" 3 " 130 •• 81 " 



Miss Passe: " I have decided to appear 
at the fancy dress ball in a costume of the 
Middle Ages." 

Miss Cayenne: "Oh! how appropriate 
for you, to be sure." 



The effect which the use of the wheel, 
for business purposes, has on street railway 
traffic is marked in cities where pavements 
invite its use. In Harrisburg a count was 
recently made of all persons using cars or 
wheels, who passed a given point on Third 
Street, in 2 days, and it was found that but 
1,962 rode by in the cars, as against 4,116 
who passed on bicycles. 



" Kitty has left the golf club." 

"What's the trouble?" 

" She says she won't countenance any 
sport to which she can not take dear 
Poodle." 



An English alderman is responsible for 
the exclamation: " Gentlemen, I consider 
it our bounden duty to degrade and pave 
these streets. By putting our heads to- 
gether we can, at least, construct a wooden 
pavement, and by so doing our posteriors 
will forever bless us." 



The Indian's opinion of his pale face 
brother and his wheel is, " white man heap 
dam lazy. Him sit on a chair to walk." 



" Wonderful — these chainless wheels." 
" Pooh; I've worn a chainless watch for 
years." 



Please send in all the notes and items 
you can get for this department of Rec- 
reation. 



" So you consider football educational? " 
" Highly so; if it wasn't for football lots 
of men would never think of going to col- 
lege." 



Thomas O'Reilly has been elected presi- 
dent, Robert E. Shaw captain, and C. Wid- 
mer, Jr., secretary of the Harlem Wheel- 
men. 



it. 



Worry causes indigestion — cycling cures 



CANOEING. 



AMERICAN CANOE ASSOCIATION 
1897-98. 

Commodore, F. L. Dunnell, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Secy- Treas. , C. V. ScJinyler, jog Sixth 
Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PURSERS. 

Atlantic Division, Wm. M. Carpenter, 
Main St., Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Central Division, Laurence C. Wood- 
worth, Gouverneur , N. Y. 

Eastern Division, F. J. Burrage, West 
Newtown, Mass. 

Northern Division, Edgar C. Woolsey, 
37 Charles St., Ottawa, Can. 

Annual dues, $1 ; initiation fee, $1: 
Date of meet for i8q8, Aug. 5th to igth, 
Stave Island, 1000 Islands, N. Y. 

A. C. A. MEMBERSHIP. 

Applications for membership may be 
made to the purser of the division in which 
the applicant resides on blanks furnished 
by purser, the applicant becoming a mem- 
ber provided no objection be made within 
fourteen days after his name has been offi- 
cially published in Recreation. 



WINNERS OF LAWRENCE CANOE CLUB 
PADDLING TROPHY. 

Walter B. Perkins, the winner of the 
Trophy in 1891 and 1893 is well remem- 
bered among the canoeists during 1888 to 
1894. He was especially fast with either 
single or double paddle, always in condi- 
tion, and ready for a contest. He was 
several times a winner in the New England 
Amateur Rowing Assn. regattas, and Man- 
hattan Marine and Field Races. He is a 
member of the Vesper Boat Club of Low- 
ell, Mass. Time, 1891, 8^4 minutes; 1893, 
9 minutes. 

William O. Russell, the winner in 1892, 
is a well known member of the Lawrence 
Canoe Club, Lawrence, Mass. Time 10 
minutes 30 seconds. 

Marcus Butler, the winner in 1894, is a 
member of the Lawrence Canoe Club- 
Lawrence, Mass. Time 10 minutes 15 sec- 
onds. 

Fred'k H. Harrison, winner in 1895 and 
1896, is a member of the Agawam Boat 
Club, Lawrence, Mass. In 1895 he had 
•as competitor L. A. Taylor, but easily won 
in 10 minutes; in 1896 no contestant ap- 
peared, and the Trophy was awarded to 
Harrison. 



Louis S. Drake, the winner in 1897, is 
the well known Captain of the Wawbewa- 
wa Canoe Club, Newton, Mass., and Vice- 
Commodore of the Eastern Division, 
A. C. A. Four contestants entered — F. H. 
Harrison, Robert Bowie, Mose Colon and 
L. S. Drake, and until the turning stake 
was reached it was anybody's race. Drake 
then pulled out, winning easily in 9 min- 
utes. 

This Trophy, according to the terms un- 
der which it is offered by the L. C. C, is 
competed for under the auspices of that 
Club on its race course on the Merrimac 
river at Lawrence. The start is about 200 
yards above the big 35 foot dam in the 
Merrimac, and opposite the L. C. C. house. 
The course is up stream straight-away one 
half mile to turning stake, and return. The 
river at this point is over a quarter of a 
mile wide, and the race course is one of the 
finest in New England. 



WAWBEWAWA "SMOKER." 

The Wawbewawa Canoe Club house on 
the Charles river, Auburndale, Mass., was 
the scene of a jolly gathering of Eastern 
canoeists on Saturday evening, December 
11, the occasion being the club's second 
" Smoker " of the winter season. 

Chairman of the house committee Hoff- 
man, with the assistance of Messrs. Wiggin 
and Hines, furnished good music with 
piano, harmonica, mandolin and banjo, 
and Clarence B. Ashenden rendered sev- 
eral songs in his usual pleasing manner. 

Many members of the A. C. A. were on 
hand to talk over affairs of the Association 
and to participate in the entertainment. 

Among those present were Vice-Com- 
modore Louis S. Drake, Raymond Apol- 
lonio, Chas. F. Dodge, Louis A. Hall, L. 
G. F. Hoffman, Purser Francis J. Burrage, 
Clarence B. Ashenden, Parry C. Wiggin. 
H. Carleton Wiggin, A. W. Ashenden, F. 
S. Ashenden, Henry W. Langley, E. T. 
Brigham, John B. May, W. W. Crosby, 
Wellington Wells, Chas. W. Knapp, W. V. 
Forsaith, A. T. S. Clay, H. Stewart Bos- 
son, A. W. McAdams, Roger D. Smith, 
W. L. Plimpton, David Foster, Stedman 
Smith, Julius B. Waterbury, and Geo. B. 
Smith. 

About all the active clubs in Eastern 
Massachusetts were represented, including 
the Shuh-Shuh-Gahs, of Winchester, the 
Vesper Boat Club, of Lowell, Fish-Brook 
Association, and Lawrence Canoe Club, of 
Lawrence, Innitous, of Woburn, Bradford 
B. C, of Cambridge, Dedham B. C. Puri- 
tan Canoe Club, and Boston Athletic As- 
sociation. 

The committee in charge of the winter's 



159 



i6o 



RECREA TION. 



entertainment consists of Louis S. Drake, 
Francis J. Burrage, W. V. Forsaith, L. A. 
Hall, L. G. F. Hoffman, and C. W. Knapp. 



WHAT THE BUFFALOES ARE DOING. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: The phenomenal 
growth of the Buffalo Canoe Club is a mat- 
ter of general comment. In October, after 
the close of our summer club house, which 
is located in Canada, on Abino bay, 12 
miles from here, the limit of membership 
was raised from 100 to 150, and up to the 
present time we have had 40 applications 
for membership. Our new limit has al- 
ready been reached. 

We are now planning our fifteenth an- 
nual dinner, which will probably be held 
February 19th, and we are looking forward 
with pleasure to a visit, at that time, from 
Commodore Dunnell, and a delegation of 
Brooklyn and New York canoeists. "Stave 
Island, August, '98 " is our war cry, and I 
expect to corral a herd of at least 20 " Buf- 
faloes " for that event. 

The past year has been the banner year 
of our existence, from a boating stand- 
point, our sailing races being especially 
well contested and the paddling races were 
interesting. We are planning to get at least 
12 new paddling canoes next season, and 
there is some talk of buying 2 or 3 addi- 
tional decked racing canoes. 

Eleven of our boys enjoyed their visit to 
the A. C. A. Camp, at Grindstone island, 
so much that the enthusiasm they brought 
back with them, and the glowing accounts 
of the royal good times they had, has done 
much toward increasing interest in the 
club. 

The club not having a suitable winter 
club house, meets each Saturday night, 
during the winter, at the home of the Vice- 
Commodore, where old times are talked 
over, and plans for next season discussed. 

C. H. E. 



THE A. C. A. SKATING CLUB. 

The A. C. A. Skating Club has been or- 
ganized, with a membership of 50, repre- 
senting the Yonkers, Brooklyn, New York 
and Ianthe canoe clubs, with headquarters 
at the Ice Palace Rink, 107th Street and 
Lexington Avenue, New York City. 
Through the courtesy of Mr. E. H. Bar- 
ney, of the Springfield C. C, the privileges 
of the rink, including admission, use of 
skates and a private room for meetings, 
has been accorded to the members. The 
club meets every Monday evening, at the 
rink, and those who so desire are served 
with dinner, from 6.30 to 8, at a moderate 
cost. The club fills a long-felt want in 
providing a convenient meeting place for 
canoeists, and every Monday night a good- 



ly number may be found at the rink, re. 
hearsing the scenes of the '97 meet and 
forming plans for '98 and " Old Stave." 

All members of the A. C. A. are eligible 
for membership, and any member who will 
communicate with Louis Simpson, Presi- 
dent, Yonkers C. C, or W. N. Stanley, 554 
Quincy Street, Brooklyn, Secretary-Treas- 
urer, will receive all particulars. 

In reply to Mr. L. B. Palmer's remark, 
in January Recreation, to the effect that 
there is no paddler on the Regatta Com- 
mittee, the R. C. beg to say that one of 
their number is willing to race him, from 
10 feet to 10 miles, for a bottle of Seagrim, 
and he can arrange the conditions to suit 
himself. The Regatta Committee. 



In the proposed schedule of races, to be 
run at the A. C. A. meet in August, 1898, 
which was recently published, the limita- 
tion of crews of war canoes, to a maximum 
of 9 men, was an error. There is no limit 
to crews of war canoes. 

Percy F. Hogan, 
Chairman Regatta Committee. 



Vice-Commodore D'Arcy Scott, cham- 
pion paddler '93 and '97, won the inter- 
national paddling trophy at Toronto, de- 
feating the representative paddlers of the 
Detroit Boat and Canoe Club, and of the 
Toronto Canoe .Club. 



The Toronto Canoe Club hold informal 
monthly hops, at the club house, during 
the winter, which are very popular. 



Judge Dartnell, of Whitby, Ont., A. C. 
A. 492, has been dangerously ill with 
apoplexy. 



APPLICATIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP. 

Addison Wilmurt, 54 E. 13th St., N. Y. 

Wm. D. Cram, Box 608, Haverill, Mass. 

Jno. Robson, Fells, Mass. 

Edward Denham, Union St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Stedman Smith, 87 Milk St.. Boston, Mass. 

David Foster, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Jno. B. May, 272 Center St., Newton, Mass. 



LOVERS ONCE, BUT MARRIED NOW. 

The sky was blue 

And full of sun. 
Rang wedding bells 

And two were one. 

A stress of storm 
Kept all things blue. 

Divorce courts yawned — 
And one was two. 



—Judge. 



He — Would you be mad if anybody 
should see me kiss you? 
She — Is anybody looking? 

— Lincoln Union. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



161 



BOOK NOTICES. 

MRS. WRIGHT'S OTHER BIRD BOOK. 

The new edition of Mrs. Mabel Osgood 
Wright's " Birdcraft " comes to me en- 
larged, improved, and fairly beaming with 
the joy of assured success. As one turns 
through this fine specimen of book-mak- 
ing, it is quickly apparent that in its pro- 
duction the author, the artist, and the pub- 
lishers have all done their " level best." 
I am glad The Macmillan Company is en- 
tering, with so much spirit, into the pro- 
duction of first-class books on popular 
natural history, and that the pace they are 
setting for their rivals is so decidedly hot. 
Lucky indeed are the nature lovers of to- 
day that they are furnished, at merely 
trifling prices, such charming bird books as 
this, and others recently noticed in Rec- 
reation. 

" Citizen Bird " was distinctly a book for 
young people; but this is for grown folks 
and children to share, between them. In 
this volume Mr. Fuertes' illustrations are 
about twice as large as in the other, and 
at least 4 times as good. Unquestionably, 
they are fine. The rendering (in black and 
white) of the various colors of birds, some- 
times to the extent of 4 or 5 on a single 
subject, yet without losing the contours of 
the specimens, is really wonderful. Con- 
sidering the excellence of the figures gener- 
ally, I am led to wonder why the Yellow- 
Billed Cuckoo should be so hopelessly flat; 
but when we turn 2 leaves, and are greeted 
by our saucy old friend, the Belted King- 
fisher, who actually looks blue and white, 
we quickly forget the other. What a queer 
plate is that of the Crossbill! At first we 
'see a double-headed bird, with the 2 halves 
perfectly, and even artistically joined to- 
gether amidships; but on close inspection 
we see that 2 complete birds are intended. 

As a test of Mrs. Wright's descriptions, 
I took a warbler, which I could not name 
at sight, and attempted to identify it by 
means of the key. I did not get on so suc- 
cessfully as I expected. The result proved 
that, for my use, the descriptions provided 
to facilitate the identification of unknown 
species are rather brief, and are too general 
in their terms. It is a serious task to pro- 
vide a key to birds that will really unlock 
unknown species. But in justice to the 
author it should be said that for all save a 
comparatively few of our birds, her key and 
descriptions will be found quite sufficient. 

I notice that our old friend, the robin, is 
classed with the " Birds Conspicuously Red 
or Orange; " and his nearest neighbors are 
the Redstart and the Scarlet Tanager! This 
will never do. The breast of the Robin is 
as pure a brown as Van Dyck himself ever 
mixed. 

Why do I mention so small a slip of the 
eye and the pen, combined? Simply be- 



cause womankind is so prone to flout the 
color-judgment of men; and this chance 
is too good to be lost. Nevertheless, I 
heartily welcome the new edition of Bird- 
craft, and commend it to my readers; both 
for its beauty and its worth. 

Birdcraft: A Field-Book of Two Hun- 
dred Song, Game and Water Birds, By 
Mabel Osgood Wright; with 80 full page 
plates by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. New 
York. The Macmillan Company, 1897, 
8vo., pp. xvi. — 317. $2.50. 



Paul Kester's new book, " Tales of the 
Real Gypsy," was scarcely dry from the 
press when the first edition was sold out. 

The gypsies go about the country so 
quietly and independently that we do not 
realize how little we know of them until 
some one reminds us. Mr. Kester is their 
friend, and as such he writes of them, with 
a charm that sinks deep into the heart. 
The noise and turmoil and distress of a 
busy, grinding, heartless world are shut 
out and forgotten in the joy of sunlight, 
of freedom, of the sound of the night wind, 
the call of the whip-poor-will, the voice of 
Nature talking with her children. The 
gypsy foregoes houses and lands, wealth 
and position, luxury and fame, to feel the 
dust of the road beneath his feet, to sleep 
near the brown earth, to lie in the sun, to 
breathe the air of boundless freedom, and 
to call no man master. He pities and de- 
spises the poor Gorgios, who shut them- 
selves within walls and barter all the joys 
of life for gold. 

Of these traits and more, Mr. Kester 
tells delightfully. 

There is one black night when murder 
fastens its fangs in a woman's throat, and 
we are glad to escape from the recital of 
that tale into the sunlight again; but the 
murder is of, not by, a Romany, for the 
gypsy is not criminal. He knows more 
about a horse than a Gorgio knows, and is 
deft at lifting a chicken from its roost on 
a dark night. What would you? A man 
with a family to support must be clever at 
something. Beyond these trifling lapses 
from our narrow code, the Romany rye is 
moral. We are glad to be assured of this, 
remembering Quasimodo and Esmeralda: 
glad to follow the gay vans down the road; 
to learn bits of the quaint Romany lan- 
guage, and to touch hands, in this end of 
an unromantic century, with the most ro- 
mantic people the world has ever known. 

Published by Doubleday & McClure. 
Price $1. 



Doubleday and McClure Co. will give 
the paper-covered books a hard blow, and 
will endear themselves to all lovers of liter- 
ature by one of their latest ideas. They are 
publishing some of the best things ever 



l62 



RECREA 770 N. 



written in dainty, cloth-covered little vol- 
umes, beautiful enough to adorn the library 
of a millionaire, and cheap enough to be 
within the reach of an editor. 

" Little Masterpieces " is an attractive 
set. One volume contains characteristic 
short stories of Washington Irving; an- 
other, of Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the 
third, of Edgar Allan Poe. Each has a fine 
photo-gravure portrait of the author, and 
the selections are admirable. 

This set is edited by Bliss Perry, is beau- 
tifully printed, has gilt tops, and is put up 
in a novel little half case. Price, cloth, 90 
cents; full leather, $1.80. 

Another set is " Tales from McClure's." 
The general title defines these, and the 
volumes are " Tales of the West," " Tales 
of Adventure," " Tales of Humor," and 
" Romance." 

Everyone knows McClure's magazine is 
a phenomenal success, because it publishes 
what people want to read; and this collec- 
tion will delight every lover of short 
stories. If you want to endear yourself to 
a reading friend, make him a Christmas 
present of one of these sets. Doubleday 
and McClure Co. will send you their cata- 
logue. Mention Recreation. 



The Badminton Magazine, for Novem- 
ber, contains an article on, " The Stickeen 
river, as the route to the Klondyke," by 
Clive Phillips-Wolley, which will be read 
with deep interest by every one who is 
looking toward Alaska; and that means the 
multitude. The article was written in '95, 
and strangely enough predicts the great 
stampede to the Klondyke gold fields, 
which has since set in. The story is illus- 
trated with a lot of interesting views of the 
Stickeen river country, from photographs 
made by Mr. Phillips-Wolley, when he 
went over the route, which add materially 
to the interest thereof. 

The Badminton Magazine is published 
by Longmans, Green & Co., 91 5th Ave., 
New York, and every number contains a 
great deal of interesting matter, for Amer- 
ican as well as for English sportsmen. It 
deserves a large circulation in this country, 
and will doubtless have it, in time, if it has 
not obtained it already. The price is 30 
cents a copy and it would be well for every 
one contemplating a trip to Alaska, to 
send for the November issue. 



Vol. 5 of " The Philistine " is out, in a 
form to delight the book lover. The copies 
are simply slid, covers and all. between at- 
tractive boards. This unique idea in bind- 
ing commends itself strongly in these days 
when publishers make the covers of maga- 
zines so interesting. 

Not to subscribe to " The Philistine " is 



to show lack of taste and love for good 
literature, and to miss half the joy of living. 
Published by Elbert Hubbard, East 
Aurora, N. Y., at $1 a year. 



HOW WALTHAM WATCHES ARE SOLD. 

The American Waltham Watch Com- 
pany has just commenced to make the 
watch movement numbered 10,000,000. It 
will be nearly a year before No. 10,000,000 
comes on the market, for the making of a 
Waltham watch means a good deal more 
than material and jewels. The brains of 
the watch-making industry are employed 
at Waltham. Few persons realize how 
high a form of mechanical skill is required 
in the making and putting together and ad- 
justing of the parts of a Waltham watch. It 
is this same skill and ingenuity that has 
made these watches pre-eminent in the 
markets of the world, and that has given 
the American Waltham Watch Company 
an outlet for its enormous product in the 
past 50 years. It is a fact that, ticking away 
all over the globe, there are more Waltham 
watches than of all other American watches 
combined. There is no finer or more dis- 
tinctive American industry than watch- 
making. It should be a source of pride to 
every good American citizen that in the 
farthest corners of the globe one is sure to 
find Waltham watches. 



I have organized a club at Preston, 
Idaho, and have christened it the Recrea- 
tion Rifle Club. 

B. Garrett, Oxford, Idaho. 

I thank you for this honor and send you 
a flag herewith, properly inscribed. When 
it shall reach you, kindly present it to the 
Club, with my compliments. — Editor. 



ROUGHING IT. 

" Isabel cured her husband of the Klon- 
dike fever." 

" How? Did she let him go there? " 
" No; she made him wear coarse woollen 
socks and sleep in a tent, in their back- 
yard." 



Kindly make your remittances by New 
York draft, or by P. O. or express money 
order. Checks on banks outside of New 
York cost me 5 cents to 25 cents each to 
collect. 



William Runce, son of Gottlieb Bunce, has returned home 
with 85 pounds of gray squirrels as a result of a 2 days' 
hunt in Dutchess County.— Kingston, Md., paper. 

And now William should be consigned 
to a place in the pen, with the other swine. 
— Editor. 



RECREA 7'/ ON. 



163 




S pme recent trophies made by this firm.,.. 



The Sanford Cup 
The Lenox Cup 

(Golf) 

The Ardslev Cup 

{Intercollegiate Golf) 

The Stirrup Cup 



{For Gentleman Riders, Coney Island, 1SQ7) 



yrjfz* 



Theodore B. Starr 



Club Committees and individuals hav- 
ing in view the purchase of prize 
pieces, are invited to inspect the many 
suitable articles of silverware (solid 
only) offered by this house. The 
opportunity to submit special designs 
for important prizes is solicited. 



206 Tifth Avenue 

riadison Square 



New York 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



RECREATION'S THIRD ANNUAL COMPETI- 
TION. 

Recreation has conducted 2 amateur 
photographic competitions, both of which 
have been eminently successful. A third 
will be held, which it is believed will be far 
more fruitful than either of the others. This 
one will open January 1 '98, and close April 
30, '98. 

Following is the list of prizes as thus far 
arranged. Others may be added later: 

First Prize — A Folding Kodak, made by the East- 
man Kodak Company, of Rochester, N. Y., and valued 
at $75. 

Second Prize — $25 in cash. 

Third Prize — A Cycle Korona Camera, made by the 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y., and valued at 
$22.50. 

Fourth Prize — An Adlake Camera, made by the 
Adams andWestlake Co., Chicago, and valued at $12. 

Fifth Prize — An Amateur Rotary Burnisher, made 
by the Acme Burnisher Co., Fulton, N. Y., and valued 
at $10. 

Sixth Prize — A Baby Hawkeye Camera, made by 
the Blair Camera Co., of Boston, and valued at $6. 

Seventh Prize — 1 Gross Blue Label photo print paper. 

Eighth Prize — 1 Gross Aristo Jr. photo print paper. 

Ninth Prize — 1 Gross Aristo Plalino photo print pa- 
per, made by American Aristotype Company, James- 
town, N. Y. 

The makers of the 15 next best pictures 
will each be awarded a yearly subscription 
to Recreation. 

The contest will close April 30, '98. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures 
or groups of persons, or domestic animals, 
representing, in a truthful manner, shoot- 
ing, fishing, amateur photography, bicy- 
cling, sailing, or other form of outdoor 
sport or recreation. Cychng pictures es- 
pecially desired. Awards to be made by 3 
judges, none of whom shall be competitors. 

Conditions: — Contestants must submit 2 
mounted silver, bromide, platinum, or car- 
bon prints, of each subject, which shall be- 
come the property of Recreation. The 
name and address of the sender, and title 
of picture, to be plainly written on back of 
each print. Daylight, flashlight, or electric 
light pictures admissible. Prize winning 
photographs to be published in Recrea- 
tion, full credit being given in all cases. 

Pictures that have been published else- 
where, or that have been entered in any 
other competition, not available. No entry 
fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look at the 
camera. Occupy them in some other way. 
Many otherwise fine pictures failed to win 
in the last competition, because the makers 
did not heed this warning. 



ABOUT THAT FIRST PRIZE. 

It will be remembered that Mrs. Myra 
Wiggins, of Eugene, Ore., was awarded 



first prize, in Recreation's Second An- 
nual Photo Competition; that after the 
prize was shipped her, and after her pict- 
ures were published in Recreation, it 
was discovered they had already been pub- 
lished, elsewhere, before being submitted 
in this competition. I stated these facts in 
November Recreation, and meantime 
wrote Mrs. Wiggins, personally,' request- 
ing her to return the camera which she had 
thus unfairly obtained. This, she has, up 
to this time, refused to do. Mr. Wiggins 
wrote Mr. Hornaday, Mr. Daniels and Mr. 
Thompson, who acted as judges in the 
Photo competition, appealing to them for a 
decision as to whether or not his wife had 
acted unfairly in submitting pictures, in a 
prize competition, that had already been 
published in other magazines. 

Following is Mr. Hornaday's reply to 
Mr. Wiggins. Mr. Daniels and Mr. 
Thompson advise me they have replied to 
him substantially on similar lines. It is 
hoped this review of the case, by the 
judges, will be satisfactory to Mrs. Wig- 
gins and that she will now return the prize 
which was awarded her under a misappre- 
hension of facts. 

Mr. Hornaday's letter is as follows: 

New York, December 12, 1897. 

Mr. F. A. Wiggins, 

Salem, Oregon. 

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter 
of December 3d, and enclosures, all of 
which I have gone over twice. Since you 
ask my unprejudiced judgment on the mat- 
ter of the photographic competition, and 
its results, I will offer it. In doing so, 
however, I must ask you to believe that in 
taking up the subject, I have tried to con- 
sider it as dispassionately as if Mrs. Wig- 
gins and Mr. Shields were both entire 
strangers to me. There is but one person 
in the world whom I stand by, " right or 
wrong," and that is my wife. This is what, 
in my opinion, every husband should do. 
My friendship for Mr. Shields is quite off- 
set by my natural inclination to take the 
side of the woman, in every disagreement 
with a man. In this case, I have tried to 
put myself into the place of each party, in 
turn; and this is how it all looks to me: 

I believe it to be universally understood 
that whenever a publisher or a patron of 
the arts, in any branch, puts up b. list of 
prizes to be competed for, the objects en- 
tered, whether stories, poems, paintings, 
sculptures or photographs, must not only 
be original, but also never before publicly 
exhibited or published. I think I am with- 
in bounds in saying that amongst literary 
people and artists the understanding on 
these 2 points is world-wide. The value 



164 



AMA TEUR J'HOTOGJiAP/fY. 



1G5 



sought, as a quid pro quo for the prizes 
given, is the honor and prestige attaching 
to presentation to the public, for the first 
time, of the prize-winning objects. To a 
publisher who uses only original matter 
(and there are many such) a story, poem 
or picture which has been published, is 
" dead," and not to be used by them ex- 
cept when paid for at advertising rates. No 
sane publisher would ever (I imagine) 
offer prizes (knowingly) for either literary 
or artistic work which had already been 
published! 

Had the question arisen before the com- 
petition I would, without hesitation, have 
taken the ground that these conditions are 
so well understood by all intelligent per- 
sons that not one competitor in 1,000 
would ever make a mistake about it. 
In certain other competitions which I 
have closely observed, I remember the 
conditions did specify that things offered 
must be " original " ; but I never saw it 
stipulated that " nothing must be offered 
which has already been published." A pub- 
lisher cannot possibly obtain exclusive 
ownership of a thing that has been pub- 
lished before it reaches him, except by se- 
curing proprietorship from the first pub- 
lisher. 

Inasmuch as Mrs. Wiggins is unques- 
tionably a lady of intelligence and pos- 
sessed of a general knowledge of matters 
pertaining to art, it was, in my opinion, a 
great oversight, on her part, that she did 
not inform Mr. Shields her pictures had 
been published before. I am sure any 
judge, on the bench, would hold she was 
to blame for ignoring a point which is of 
such vital importance to a publisher, and 
doubly so when the matter is in competi- 
tion for prizes. Certainly every editor and 
publisher in the world would so regard it. 
If all the 700 competitors had felt at liberty 
to send the best pictures they had ever 
taken, we would have probably had 5,000 
to examine instead of 1,200 or so. 

I consider that Mr. Shields had cause for 
indignation; for at the very least he should 
— and the judges should — have been given 
the option of deciding whether the highest 
honor and & a highest prize should be 
awarded to a stale picture. Had the judges 
known the facts, Mrs. Wiggins's pictures 
would not have been considered, even for 
one moment. 

The only way in which Mrs. Wiggins 
can make the amende honorable is to return 
the camera. 

W. T. Hornaday. 

The following extract from a letter writ- 
ten by F. A. Munsey to a contributor who 
had sold him material that had been pub- 
lished years ago by a contemporary is 
strikingly applicable to this case. 

You may possibly fail to realize, fully, the contemptibly 
dishonest nature of your action. It is impossible for any 



editor, or corps of editors, to be familiar with the whole 
range of printed literature. Our only safeguard against 
fraud of this sort is to exclude, in loto, the work of per- 
sons unknown to us. Such a ride would he a great hard 
ship to young and unknown writers, hut frauds BUI 
this will compel us to adopt it. It is probably a waste of 
lime to write further to a man who would he guilty of 
such an action ; but we must add our regret that it would 
be still greater waste of time to prosecute you criminally. 



HOW TO INDEX NEGATIVES. 

How many of Recreation's readers 
have a perfect system of registering their 
negatives? I mean without spending hours 
in looking through their entire stock in 
search of a certain negative, from which 
they desire to make a print? You have the 
negative. Of that there is no doubt; but 
where is it? 

First of all obtain .a plain ruled book. 
It need not be a large one. Rule 3 col- 
umns on the right of the page, and then 
index it, allowing several pages for each 
letter. 

Number each negative, regardless of 
size, from No. 1 up; either with white ink 
or by pasting a small piece of gummed 
paper on the glass side, on which the num- 
ber may be written in ink. 

Each negative is certainly known to the 
person who made it, by a title, as " Public 
Building," or " Old Mill," etc. Write the 
title under the proper letter in the first 
column. Put the date in the next; the 
number next, and in the last column the 
number of the box in which the negative 
is stored. Use the boxes in which the 
plates were originally packed. 

Then, when yon want a certain negative, 
no matter how long since it was made, all 
you have to do is to look it up in the 
register, find the box number and there 
it is. How much easier than looking 
through several hundred negatives, even if 
they are enclosed in separate envelopes. 
There is a chance of one being taken out 
of the centre, of a stack, and after use not 
being replaced. 

A double register (the one I use) is made 
by ruling 2 columns, divided by a double 
line, on several of the last pages and in the 
first column writing the numbers, begin- 
ning with 1, and opposite the box number 
in "which the negative is. Thus you can 
find a negative, either by its title or num- 
ber, in a much shorter time than by any 
other method. 

G. A. C. 



A good hydrochinon developer, in one 
solution, is made thus: Sulphite soda crys- 
tals, 500 gr. ; phosphate soda, granular, 240 
gr. ; carbonate soda crystals, 500 gr. ; and 
water to make 16 ounces. Dissolve, filter, 
and add hydrochinon, 100 grains. 

A. S. R. 



i66 



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No Camera is a KODAK 
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i68 



RECREA TION. 



Drawings of Frontier and 

Western fiilitary Life 

BY 

Frederic 
Remington 

Faithful presentments of actual 
scenes portrayed by a man who has 
seen the life and lived it. Large folio, 
12 x 18 inches, with striking cover in 
color, designed by Mr. Remington. 

Price, $5.00 

Edition=de=Luxe of above, num- 
bered and signed by Mr. Remington, 
limited to 250 copies, bound in full 
leather. 

Price, $10.00 

Remington Calendar 

Four strong and characteristic drawings, with a beautiful photogravure reproduction, 
suitable for framing. Price, $1.00. 

Edition-de=Luxe of above, limited to 100 numbered copies, on Japan paper, signed 
by Mr. Remington. Price, $2.50. 

Any of the above sent, prepaid, by the publisher, on receipt of price. 




Almanac of 
Twelve Sports 
for 1898 



Drawn in color by 

WILLIAM NICHOLSON 

With a rollicking verse for each month by 

RUDYARD KIPLING 

Popular Edition, $1.25 

Library Edition, $3.50 

Edition=de-Luxe, $25.00 



NICHOLSON ALPHABET 

Color plates for each letter in the Alphabet drawn by William Nicholson. 

Popular Edition, $1.50. Library Edition, $3.75. 
(Edition-de-Luxe exhausted.) 



A most attractive catalogue, with full-page illustrations, by Gibson, Remington, Abbey, 
Wenzell, Kemble, and Nicholson, frontispiece in color, SENT FREE, on application to 
readers of "Recreation" 

R. H. RUSSELL, 33 Rose Street, New York 



RECREA TION. xvii 



6undlacb 



Optical Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y* 

Manufacturers of-^>^^ 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
APPARATUS 

H§ THE most IMPORTANT part of a 
H PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFIT 

mm. t^r% is the LENS> ° ur Ienses 

JljSl|||§j§y5ik are absolutely guaranteed. 
^ ^^^^ ^ ^"^^^ Our SHUTTERS lead. 

Our Cameras are unsurpassed in workmanship or finish. 
Our prices are very low. 

The only concern in the United States turning out a complete 
camera, lens, and shutter, all of their own manufacture. 

-♦Send for Catalogue- 



GUNDLACH OPTICAL CO. 

753 to 765 So* Clinton Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



XV111 



RECREA TION. 







(Taken on a Carbutt Orthochromatic Plate.) 
By Alois Beer, Photographer to Emperor of Austria 

To Obtain Artistic Results 

as much care must be used in the selection 
of the Plates or films as the Camera. 

CARBUTT'S PLATES AND FILMS 

(STANDARD FOR 20 YEARS) 

Give Universal Satisfaction 

Also J. C. DEVELOPING TABLOIDS, put up in 
3 sizes, price 25c, 40c, 75c 

If you intend competing for prizes let us assist you 
in winning by the aid of our Plates, Films, and De- 
veloper. For sale by all dealers. Catalogue free. 

JOHN GARBUTT, *KNHb nhMUfc 



PHOTOGRAPHING FROSTED WINDOW PANES. 

By the average amateur this is consid- 
ered a rather difficult matter; but I will tell 
you how to do it successfully, and even 
how to make frost in summer. 

When a fine design is found, on a win- 
dow, place a piece of black cloth, or paper, 
at an angle of 45 degrees back of it and 
then make the exposure. 

To make your own frost mix stale beer 
with epsom salts and apply with a sponge, 
to a clean piece of glass. If fresh lager is 
used the crystals will be small and uniform; 
but if old lager then the crystals will be 
much larger and handsomer. Any variety 
of designs may be made, as no 2 panes will 
crystallize alike. 

When the salts are all crystallized and 
the glass perfectly dry set upright, in a 
grooved piece of wood, and proceed as in 
photographing natural frost, by placing a 
piece of black paper back of the glass at an 
angle of 45 degrees. 



Paterfamilias — Look here, Dick, you've 
been a bit wild yourself in your day, and 
I'd like some advice. What am I to do 
with Harry? The young rascal exceeds 
his allowance every month. 

Cousin Dick — Increase it. 

— Chicago Journal. 




The Baby, $5 

Size, 2 1-2x3 J - 2 x 4 in. 

Photo, 2 x 2 1-2 in. Weight, 7 oz. 

Loaded with 12 exposures 



Success in | 
Photography ) 

is only obtained by using an outfit well 
made, with high-grade lens, and reliable 
shutter. 



The Hawk- Eyes 



manufactured in various styles and sizes from the " Baby " up, can be loaded 
and unloaded in broad daylight, can be used with film or glass plates and war- 
ranted to prove just as represented. 



Why not make your Own Photographs? 



A Guide-Book is furnished with each camera that 

will enable the novice to produce good results 




from the start 



THE BLAIR CAMERA CO., Mfes. 

22 Randolph St., Boston, Mass. 
, Send for Illustrated Catalogue which tells everything 



RECREA TION. 



xix 




Life is too Short 



to bother with slow, te- 
dious, and difficult print- 
ing processes. That's 
why you should use our 
Velox papers. They can 
be used at any time, day 
or night. 

It takes an INCREDIBLY SHORT TIME for 
turning out LOTS of prints. 

NO PROCESS SO EASY and SIMPLE 
gives such 

Artistic and Permanent Results 

SAHPLE PACKAGES of two dozen Cabs., 
or 4x5, two Sample Prints, and Developer, 
will be sent on receipt of 50 cents. 

We manufacture ALL kinds of photographic papers, 
gelatine, collodion, matt, glossy, Bromide, etc. 

NEPERA CHEMICAL CO. 

Works and Head Office, NEPERA PARK, N. V. 

St. 
Poissonniere. 

Order from your dealer, and if he does not fill 
your order, we WILL. 



Branch Offices ( g hi ? a ^' I1L ' 2I Q" inc 7 ' 
( Pans, France, 159 Faub. 



BLAVATSKY AND DEBAR. 

" These theosophists say they can live on 
thought — on atmosphere." 

" Yes; most of them do look as if they 
had been pumped up." 



Uantern colored 

In the most artistic manner 
Refers to the editor of 
"Recreation." 

MRS. FRED. MATHER 
63 Linden Street BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Slides 



The Weather-^ 

is always a fruitful topic of conversa- 
tion. It is always interesting to know 
how hot or how cold it is. It is also in- 
teresting to know what the weather is 
going to be, a few days hence. 
WE KEEP 

THERMOMETERS that register the temperature 
accurately. 

WE KEEP 

BAROMETERS that not onlv tell what the 
weather is, but what it is going to be. These, as 
well as all other optical goods, at lowest cash 
prices. Ten per cent, discount, from regular 
prices, if you mention Recreation. 

GALL & LEMBKE 21 ^wYl?k are 




CANDLE POWER HOURS FOR $1.00 (One Dollar) 
Incandescent electric light, 1600 c.p.h, 



Illu minating gas, 
Gas olene gas, ° 
Acetylene, = 



- 2S60 c.p.m. 
3200 c.p.m. 

- 6TOO c.p.m. 



"Acetylene is the coming 

NAPHEYS' ACETYLENE GAS 



I 



itluminant." 

GENERATOR 

makes a private gas plant absolutely practicable, safe 
and reliable. The only "dry" generator, and conse- 
quently the only one for domestic lighting. Approved, 
adopted by the U. S. Government. 

J. IB. COW «5te OO. 

Sole agents. Also manufacturers of 

STEREOPTIC0NS and all paraphernalia for 

light production and projection. 

New York. Chicago. San Francisco. Buffalo. 

Acetylene Gas Show Rooms at N. W. Cor. Broadway and 

37th St., New York City. Fall particulars from Dept. 4 

Main Office, II5-II7 Nassau St., New York. 






What the dealer &.'{"" 
loses in profits you 
gain in QUALITY... 





IT COSTS 

YOU THE SAME... 

IT COSTS HIM 

(AND US) 
MORE. 



FRENCH 

5ATI N 

JR. 



. THE STANDARD 

BLUE PRINT 




Of even excellence Every inch guaranteed. 
Sold by all first class dealers. 
Sample Print and Pamphlet containing price list on request 
J. C. MILLEN, M. D., • - DENVER, COLORADO. 



«x RECREATION. 



l he Baby Wizard 




Camera, 



Is the 

Ideal Camera 



Only 2f x sf x 6| inches 

for TOURISTS, WHEELMEN 

OR SPORTSMEN GENERALLY 



Fitted with our Extra Rapid 
Rectilinear Lens (unequaled in 
this country), and the Bausch 
and Itomb Optical Company's 
Iris Diaphragm Shutter. 

Complete with Carrying Case 



$25.00 





Same without rack and pinion, for focussing, and swing back 



$20.00 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Manhattan Optical Co., Cresskill, N. J. 



KECREA TION. 



xxi 





-ABETTER 

'HAS SIMPLIFIED PHOTOGRAPHY 

Has brushed aside old standards. 




THE 0NLY„^ E r 

AMATEURS CAN DO PROFESSIONAL WORK. 

Takes 12 pictures standard size, 4x5 in., on Glass Plates at 
n £ one loading. NO EXTRAS. Get Your Plates Anywhere. 

Our Adlake book free. Sample mounted photo 5c. stamps. 



CAMERA 

, IS NOW THE 

Standard 



; N T ? N Broad Daylight! 




Adlake complete with 12 light- 
tight, dust-proof metal plate holders, 
prepaid to any part of the U. S. for 



$ ]2.oo 



MADE 

OPEr 
FOR ADJUSTING PLATES 

Ask your dealer for the Adlake Camera. If he is unable 
to supply you do not accept a complicated machine, though 
it cost more, No other camera has the Adlake Principles. 

THE ADAMS & WESTLAKE CO., 

Makers of Adlake and Alaska Bicycles and X Rays Bicycle Lamp 

122 Ontario St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

New Kngland Agts., Andrew J. Lloyd & Co., Boston. 



Johnnie — I am afraid I am going to be 
a twin pretty soon. 

Jenny — What do you mean? 

Johnnie — Well, my sister Jennie used to 
be 26 years old, then she was 20, and now 
she is only 18. If she don't stop growing 
younger I'm bound to be a twin. I never 
was in such a hideous fix in my life. 

— Philadelphia Press. 



We will please you — 

If you will send us 50 cents for this combination 
One large, nickel-plated, Gun-Case Plate 
One 3-inch long, nickel-plated, Dog-Collar Plate; 
One Round, nickel-plated, Hand -Bag Check 

With your name and address on each. 

F. H. COBB & CO., 21 Collier Street 
HORNELLSVILLE, N. Y. 

Mention Recreation with all orders. 




1 The crowning glory of Woman 
m Htr Hair." 



TO BALD HEADS. 

We will mail on appli- 
cation, free information 
how to prow hair upon 
a bald head, stop falling 
hair and remove scalp 
diseases. Address, 
iltenheim Med. Dispensary, 

Dept. L.V. Box 779, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. ' 




Anastigmat 



Lenses 



Made by C P. GOERZ 
in Berlin 

Surpass all others for 

Speed and Definition 

Price-list and Test-chart free on application to 

C. P. GOERZ, saU WX B 



XX11 



RECREA T10N. 



The Wing Piano 

STYLE 7. CONCERT GRAND UPRIGHT. 

No other piano made equals this in style and design of case. 




You do not have to pay an extravagant price for a first-class piano. 
Injustice to yourself write for prices of the Wing Piano before you buy. 

THE INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT 

imitates perfectly the tone of the Mandolin, Guitar, Harp, Zither and Banjo. 
The sounds of these different instruments may be heard alone or in concert 
with the piano. 

Every Wing Piano is guaranteed for NINE YEARS against any 
defect in tone, action, workmanship or material :: :: :: :: 

^FNT OIV TI?IAI We wil1 send this p iano ' or y° ur 

*^ 1-4 1^1 1 Vrl l 1 IV*-**"—* choice of four other styles, to any 
part of the United States on trial ( all freights paid by us), allow ample time 
for a thorough examination and trial in the home, and, if the instrument is in 
any particular unsatisfactory, we will take it back at our own expense. No 
conditions are attached to this trial. We ask for no advance payment; no 
deposit. We pay all freights in advance. 

Over 18,000 Wing Pianos manufactured and sold in 29 years (since 1868). 

Our beautiful, handsomely illustrated catalogue, and a 
book of information about pianos sent free on request* 

443 and 445 West 13th Street, New York 

. . . ESTABLISHED 1868 . . . 



OLD INSTRUMENTS EXCHANGED 
EASY PAYMENTS 

Wing & Son, 



RECREA TION. 



xxin 




^ 



Uia 



Popular Pease Pianos 




NEARLY 60,000 IN USE 



Unequalled 

in 

Tone 

i)2r* 1&* <&r* 




^^* %^* ^^* 

Beautiful 

in 

Finish 

£P0 1£r* *2r* 



SEND FOR SOUVENIR CARD PIANO— FREE 

* PEASE PIANO CO. 3,6 - 3 N 2 e 2 wTo s ^f ty street * 





THE CLAIM MADE BY US THAT 



THE 




IS THE ONLY PIANO WHICH IMPROVES UNDER USAGE" 

Is proved by the fact that the unanimous 
testimony of those who have bought the 
"HARDMAN" corroborates the statement. 
Its full, resonant tone is maintained through 
years of service, and an added brilliancy, 
without metallic quality, results through use. 



XXIV 



RECREA TION. 



WOODBURY'S 




THE GRANDEST 

TOILET 
COMBINATION 

KNOWN FOR THE 

Shin, 
Scalp, 

Complexion, 
and Ceetb* 



facial Cream, 

facial Powder and 

Dental Cream. 



The Result 
of 26 Years' 
Practical 
Experience in 
Treating 
the Skin and 
Scalp. 



Dermatologist John H* Woodbury is the acknowledged authority on all 

diseases of the Skin and Scalp, having had over 26 years' practical 

experience curing Facial Blemishes. 



Oily Skin, Itching Scalp, Falling Hair and Scalp 

diseases cured ; 26 years' practical experience. 

John H. Woodbury, Inventor of 

Woodbury's Facial Soap, has had 
26 years' practical experience 
curing pimples. 

Projecting Ears Set Back Close to 

the head. No pain, no failure. 
Send for 132-page book. 

Dandruff and Itching Scalp, Fall- 
ing hair or diseases of the hair 
and scalp scientifically treated. 

Moles, Warts, Pimples, Freckles, 
all blemishes of the skin, scalp 
and complexion treated. 

Age, Illness, Care, CauseWrinkles 
Dermatologist John H. Wood- 
bury removes them. 

Moles, Warts, Freckles, Removed 

without pain or cutting by John 
H. Woodbury. 

All Marks, Blemishes, Deform= 

ities, diseases on, in, or under 
the skin, cured by Dermatologist 
John H. Woodbury. 

Blackheads, Liver Spots, Moth, 

tan, freckles, pimples, treated by 
regular physicians. 

Superfluous Hair on the Face, if Light, Removed 

by depilatory ; if strong, electricity ; permanently. 




If Anything Ails Your Skin, Scalp, Complexion or 

hair call on John H. Woodbury. 

Pug Noses, Hump, Flat, Broken, 

ill-shaped noses, made to har- 
monize with the other features ; 
send for book. 

Acne or Pimples, Comedones or 
flesh worms, permanently cured 
by John H.Woodbury. 

New Faces— All about Changing 
noses, ears, mouths and removing 
blemishes ; send for 132-page 
book. 

If your Eyebrows are thick or 
run together, it can be perma- 
nently removed. 

Freckles, Moth Patches, Liver 
spots, all skin blemishes, perma- 
nently removed without pain. 

If Your Ears Stand Out Too Far 
or your nose does not suit, send 
to Dermatologist John H. Wood- 
bury for his 132-page book. 

Thin Faces Rounded, Hard Lines 
softened, wrinkles and blemishes 
eradicated, by Dermatologist 
John H. Woodbury. 

All Facial Blemishes, Skin and 
scalp diseases permanently cured 
by John H.Woodbury. 

If Beauty Is Only Skin Deep We Can Make You 

beautiful ; 26 years' experience treating the skin. 



For twenty cents we will mail you a sample of each (sufficient for three weeks use) of 
Woodbury's Facial Soap, Facial Cream, Facial Powder and Dental Cream, and include our 132- 
page illustrated book on Dermatology, treatment for the skin and complexion, and telling how 
Featural Irregularities are corrected. The regular size of Woodbury s Facial Soap, Facial 
Cream, Facial Powder and Dental Cream are sold everywhere at 25 cents each ; Woodbury s 
Hair and Scalp Tonic, 50 cents. 

i}@=-For fifteen wrappers of either one or assorted of the regular size of 
Woodbury's Facial Soap, Facial Cream, Facial Powder or Dental Cream, 
we will send you a Diamond Stick Pin (suitable for lady or gent.), or a 
gold plated (lady's or gent's) Watch Chain which will wear from tive 
to ten years. 

John H. Woodbury Dermatological Institute 

OFFICES FOR THE CURE OF SKIN AND NERVOUS DISEASES 
AND THE REMOVAL OF FACIAL BLEMISHES : 



NEW YORK, 133 W. 42d St. 
BOSTON, U Winter St. 

Address all correspondence to 



PHILADELPHIA, 1306 Walnut St. 
CHICAGO, 163 State St. 

33 W. 42d St., New York. 



RECREA TION. 



XXV 




$3.20 

FOUR 
t FULL QUARTS j 
; Express Paid, j 



Direct from Distiller 

to Consumer 

Saving Middlemen's Profits, 

Preventing Possibility of Adulteration. 

We are distillers with a wide reputation of 30 
years standing. We sell to consumers direct, so 
that our whiskey may be pure when it reaches you. 
Adulterated whiskey is dangerous, abominable, 
yet it is almost impossible to get pure whiskey 
from dealers. We have tens of thousands of cus- 
tomers who never buy elsewhere. We want more 
of them, and we make this offer to get them: 

We will send four full quart bottles of Hayner's Seven 
Year Old Double Copper Distilled Rye for $3.20, Express 
Prepaid. We ship in plain packages — no marks to indicate 
contents (which will avoid possible comment). When 
you get it and test it, if it isn't satisfactory return it at our 
expense and we will return your $3.20. Such whiskey 
can not be purchased elsewhere for less than $5.00. 

We are the only distillers selling to consumers 
direct. Others who claim to be are dealers, buy- 
ing and selling. Our whiskey has our reputa- 
tion behind it. 

Our References— Dun or Bradstreet, Third National 
Bank or any business house in Dayton. 

Hayner Distilling Co., 267 to 273 W. 5th St. Dayton, 0. 



[We guarantee the above firm will do as agreed. — Editor.] 



On the SKng! 



Take the beautiful New 
Steamships of the •« • 




OLD 

DOMINION 

LINE 

...FOR THE,.. 

Great Duck Shooting Grounds of 

Currituck Sound, Chesapeake Bay 
Albemarle Sound, James River 

And the Gunning Resorts of.«. 



Send for copy of " PILOT," 
containing description of 
short and delightful trips. 



Virginia, West Virginia 
and North Carolina 

OLD DOMINION S. S. COMPANY 

Pier 26, North River NEW YORK 

W. L. Guillaudeu, Vice-President and Traffic Manager. 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 




^CYCLOMETER. 



the better you understand the mechanical principle on which 
it works. The more jou know of the simplicity of its con- 
struction, the more sure you are of its absolute superiority 
OT©r all other distance recorders for bicycles. 

Price $1.00. At all retailers. Catalogue free from 

VEEDER MFG. CO., Hartford, Conn. 



The passenger department of the Lehigh 
Valley Ry. line has issued one of the neat- 
est and tastiest calendars I have seen. Be- 
sides the calendar proper, the card gives a 
map of the L. V. Road, showing the coun- 
try between New York, Philadelphia, Buf- 
falo and Niagara Falls. 

It also shows some beautiful steel en- 
gravings of scenery along the Lehigh line, 
including Mauch Chunk, the Wyoming 
Valley and Niagara Falls. We seldom see 
a piece of steel engraving nowadays, and it 
is really refreshing to look upon so fine an 
example of this lost art as is given in this 
calendar. 

You can get a copy of it by writing Chas. 
S. Lee, G. P. A., Philadelphia, mentioning 
Recreation. 



The Marlin Arms Co. has issued a neat 
little pocket calendar containing a good 
picture of moose hunting. The leaflets, 
showing the dates, are neatly printed and 
arranged and the whole thing takes up but 
little room. Write for a copy and mention 
Recreation. 



" Do you ever go fox hunting? " 
"No; it keeps me .busy chasing off the 
wolf." 



Notice: I will pay to the publisher of 
Recreation 25 cents each for the first 50 
new yearly subscriptions received, after 
February 1st, in which this offer may be 
mentioned. That is, these 50 people may 
send the publisher of Recreation 75 cents 
each; he will send them the magazine one 
year and I will pay him the remaining 25 
cents on each subscription. The object of 
this is that these subscriptions may be 
counted on my club, for which a merchan- 
dise premium is to be sent me. 

U. W. Gallaher, Rock Port, Mo. 

I agree to the above proposition and will 
comply with my part of it. 

G. O. Shields, Editor and Manager. 



♦For Sale: Stevens Ideal rifle; No. 46, 
25-25; 28 inch half-octagon barrel; g l / 2 
pounds, mid-range; Vernier rear and wind- 
gauge front sight with spirit-level; Lyman 
ivory front sight, fancy walnut stock, Swiss 
and hunting butt-plates; almost new, per- 
fectly accurate. Cost $33, sell for $15; 25-86 
gr. Ideal mould; No. 3, 25-25 Ideal tool, 
adjustable chambers, muzzle resizer, wad- 
cutter, Ideal ball seater, 75 shells, 1,000 
primers, rifle case with strap, $6; Ideal 
powder flask, $1. All perfect, used but 
little. J. J. Bowman, 

150 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ESTABLISHED 1875 
TELEPHONE 2591 

ELLWOOD E. HUEBNER 

15 John R Street 
DETROIT, MICH. 

FURS 



PRACTICAL 

FURRIER and 

DESIGNER 

FASHIONS LATEST 
PRICES LOWEST 

PERSONAL ATTENTION 

TO ALL ORDERS 
WORK GUARANTEED 

Write lor prices Mention RECREATION 



R EC RE A TION. 



XXVll 



Travelers 



seeking " a good time " or renewed health naturally turn seaward. 
In winter the favorite — almost the only — ocean resort is far-famed 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

What other seaside city can boast a " season " lasting all the 
year 'round ? 

In hotels there is always a choice. Let us send you a book con- 
cerning the one we know most about. 



J. D. SOUTHWICK, 

Manager. 



The Shelburne. 



For Sale: A good, natural trout stream, 
with 3 ponds on same. Large trout in 
ponds and in stream. Preserve embraces 
320 acres, the stream having 2 branches, 
making it about 2 miles long. I stocked 
this property 18 months ago, with 10,000 
young trout. Have good buildings that 
will accommodate 10 persons, and 100 acres 
of land fenced. Good deer hunting in sea- 
son. Nine miles from station; good roads. 
Price $3,000. 

Frank Berquist, Box 15, Gordon, Wis. 



Wanted: Congenial hunting .compan- 
ion, for 6 weeks' trip in Florida. Good 
fishing, boating and shooting. Expenses 
light. Address C., care Recreation. 



Wanted: Second hand Winchester or 
Marlin Repeating Rifle, Calibre 40-82 or 
45-70. Must be cheap and in good condi- 
tion. Dr. James S. Kennedy, 
Chambersburg, Pa. 



''' You say she is sending back your let- 
ters unopened. Then you may be sure she 
has given you up." 

r< why? T 

" Well, it shows that her hatred is even 
greater than her curiosity." — Judy. 

Good Stamp Collections j^JEjf* 

Many CHARLES KEUTGEN 

Rarities 102 Fulton Street, New York 



PLAYS 



—SPEAKERS— 

For Home and School. 

New Catalogues FREE. 

De Witt, Rose St., N. Y. 

— D ULOGUES- 



J\ Strong Stomacb will Saw your Cife 

Therefore use Bayle's Horseradish Mustard. 

All sauces are valueless as tonics, and no other 
condiments compare with this. Ask for it. For 
sale everywhere. Geo. A. Bayle, St. Louis, Sole Maker 



Wanted to Exchange: Liver and white 
pointer pup, 5 months old; also fine sound- 
ing mandolin; for a double barrelled ham- 
merless shot gun, 12 gauge, in first class 
condition — Ithaca preferred. 

A. N. Wirls, 
Payne Ave. cor. Handy, Cleveland, O. 



For Sale or Exchange: A fine mounted 
loon. Would take rifle, or anything else 
of equal value. 

Everett G. Fadden, Noyan, P. Q., Can. 



For Sale: Brant, Wild Geese, Swans 
and Deer. Can ship during January, Feb- 
ruary, March, April and May. Prices 
quoted on application. 

J. D. Cordon, Washington, N. C. 




i TRUSCOTT BOAT MFG. CO., 



ST. JOSEPH, MICH, i 

l^t«<«>Mi^lll^lllA 



Crimped-Crust" Bread 

Baked, in shops mod- 
els in equipment to se- 
cure perfect cleanli- 
ness, by a process that 
retains all the richness 
and sweetness of the 
materials used, it makes 
a most delicious bread. 
To emphasize these 
qualities it's wrapped 
in clean white tissue. 
Get the genuine. For 
2 cents we send sample loaf and the shop's ad- 
dress that'll serve you. 

The Asbury-Paine Mfg. Co., Phifa., Pa. 



IN ANSWERING ADS ALWAYS 
MENTION RECREATION. 




XXV111 



RECREA TION. 



FOR HIS OWN SAFETY. 




;\c/v 



WUOV:.^^- 



THE* DEER HUNTER OP THE FUTURE WI1X HAVE TO BE THUS EQUIPPED. 

From the St. Paul " Dispatch." 




The Best is Always the Cheapest! 

We are the oldest builders of Marine Gas En- 
gines in the United States and guarantee 
superiority. Enquire of your boat builder, or 
address us at home office or nearest branch 
offices : ' 



68 Trinity Place, New York City 
125 South 2nd St., Philadelphia 



174 Summer St., Boston 
99 Woodward Ave., Detroit 



-• 





CATALOG. PIERCE ENG. CO., Box 6 Sta. A, 5E. OT ' 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's journal published in 
the U. S. and I ought to know, as I have taken them all. 
C. L. Sperry, Sparta, Tenn. 

I have tried nearly all other magazines and I think Rec- 
reation is better than all the rest put together. 

Jas. S. Lamont, Matteawan, N. Y. 



Enclosed find money order for $i for which please renew 
my subscription, as I cannot keep house without Recrea- 
tion. F. A. Foss, Reedsburg, Wis. 



I look forward to the coming of Recreation with long- 
ing. It is far and away the best magazine extant. 

W. H. Judd, Ypsilanti, Mich. 



RECREA TJON. 



XXIX 



DON'T let Whisky get the best of you. Get 
the BEST of Whisky, which is the GENU- 
INE DISTILLERY BOTTLING of 



Old Pepper 






ifcg 



Whisky 



.AND... 



*jy OLD "%* 

HENRY CLAYRYE 




EXTRA. CAUTION , 

W»e,raIran4Uils bottle wilhcut 6fsbvMt 

fcsfals Iscrlmlnally liable and on dtlertm 9 

Prosecuted to thefull often I of the la» 



D* 



Bottled and Distilled 
ONLY by 

J AS. E. PEPPER & CO., Lexington, Ky. 

Under the same Formula for more than 100 YEARS, is guaranteed 
Absolutely the PUREST and BEST in the world. 

SAMPLE CASE, $15.00. 

Sent on trial, which, if not satisfactory, can 
be returned and money will be refunded, 

4®* Read and save the Coupons on Old Pepper Whisky and Old Henry 
Clay Rye, and see who gets the $5,500 in addition to the $1.00 per doz. 




Captain Jack Crawford 

Alaska Prospecting and Mining Corporation 

CAPITAL STOCK - - $250,000 

Incorporated under New Jersey Laws. 

Shares $10 each. Full Paid. Non-assessable 
There are only 25,000 Shares 

PAYABLE IN FULL AT TIME OF SUBSCRIPTION OR IN 
INSTALMENTS IF PREFERRED 

Who has not heard of Captain Jack? An expert 
mining prospector and developer through all parts of 
the West and the Cariboo Placer Mines of British 
Columbia, — being one of the original discoverers of 
Gold in the Black Hills in 1876, — first bringing before 
the public the immense mineral wealth of New Mexico, 
and drawing capital to its development. 

Loved and honored by Army men for his upright- 
ness and integrity, high in the regard and trust of the 
newspaper profession, he can count among his friends 
most of the prominent men in the country, beginning 
with President McKinley. 

A master pioneer; experienced, vigorous, and 
shrewd, he will lead and direct under this Corporation 
an expedition of practical and expert miners in the 
new Alaskan Gold fields. Mother lode claims will be 
taken up for this Company, to be sold at enormous 
profits, often without expending much capital in their 
development. 

Stockholders can rest assured that reports from the 
field of operation, over Captain Jack's signature, will 
be authentic and trustworthy. 

Write for prospectus or call for further information 
at the offices of the Company, 

American Tract Society Building 
150 Nassau Street, New York City 

Captain Jack Crawford, President and Gen'l Mgr. 
General Horatio C. King, Vice-President. 
There are no promoters' shares 
Every share issued will be paid for in cash 




A Great Offer for 
the Holidays 

by GERMAHIA WINE CELLARS 

HammondBport and Rheims.N.Y. 

We are determined to introduce out 
goods among the very best people in 
the country, and we can see no better 
way of doing this than by selling thern 
a case of our goods, containing eleven 
bottles of wine and one bottle of 
our extra fine, double-distilled Grape 
Brandy, at one-half its actual cost. 
Upon receipt of $5.00, we will send, to 
any reader of RECREATION, one case 
of our goods, all first class, and put up 
in elegant style, assorted, as follows: 

' 1 Quart Bottle Grand Imperial 
Sec Champagne 
1 Quart Bottle Delaware 



1 


it 


" 


Hiesllng 


1 


(i 


«i 


Tokay 


1 


M 


ii 


Sweet Catawba 


1 


U 


it 


Sherry 


1 


if 


ii 


Elvira 


1 


If 


it 


Niagara 


1 


ii 


ii 


Angelica 


1 


ft 


ii 


Port 


1 


it 


ii 


Sweet Isabella 


1 


it 


ii 


Imperial Grape 



Brandy 

This offer is made mainly 
to introduce our Grand Im. 
perial Sec Champagne and 
our fine double-distilled 

'M Grape Brandy, without 
' which no Sportsman or 
Hunter should start on an 
expedition, as it is very 
necessary where such exer- 
cise is taken. This case of 
goods is offered at about 
one-half its actual cost and 
it will please us if our 
friends and patrons® will 
take advantage of this and 
help us introduceour goods. 

ill ordan ■konld b. la btfor* Dm* 16, 



XXX 



RECREATION, 



(UlKre to 6oisr0ood SbootinassTisbina 




i'myi 



'^^^Mm^&^%AmMmsd'-t 



The Best Game Country 

in the Mississippi Valley to- 
day is along the line of the 

IRON MOUNTAIN 
ROUTE 



In Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana 

Small Game is very abundant, and has been shot at very little. Deer and 
Turkeys are plentiful, and the fishing, for black bass and other game fishes, 
of the very best. This Line also reaches, direct from St. Louis or Memphis, 

by double daily through car service, the famous hunting and fishing grounds 
on the Gulf. 

SPECIAL FEATURES OFFERED 



Reduced Rates to Sportsmen 
Hunting Cars Fully Equipped 



Side Tracking Cars On or Near the Grounds 
Carrying Free of Dogs, Guns, and Camp Equipment 



WRITE for copy of Ideal Hunting and Fishing Pamphlet (descriptive and 
illustrated) of best locations, and other information, to Company's Agents, or to 



C. G. WARNER 

Vice-President 



W. B. DODDRIDGE 

General Manager 

ST. I.OTJIS 



H. C. TOWNSEND 
General Passenger and Ticket Agent 



Some Rare * * 
Opportunities 



..♦YOU CAN GET... 

A $75 Bicycle for 75 yearly subscrip- 
tions to Recreation. 

A $35 Hammerless Breech -Loading 
Shot Gun for 40 yearly subscriptions. 

A $25 Camera for 25 subscriptions. 

A $20 Gold Watch for 20 subscriptions. 

A $14 Repeating Rifle for 20 sub- 
scriptions. 

A Good Single Barrel Shot Gun for 
15 subscriptions. 

A Single Shot Rifle, or 

A Fishing Rod, or 

An Automatic Reel, or 

A Kenwood Sleeping Bag 
For 10 subscriptions. 

WHY DON'T YOU GET THEM ? 

Write for premium list and sample 
copies of RECREATION 




►EMPIRE STATE 
EXPRESS 

About which all know, more or less; 
It runs from New York to Buffalo, 
Every day in the week,butSunday, you know; 
At a speed soqreat, 

Through the Empire State, 
As to earn for its line 
The title sublime — of 

"AMERICAS GREATEST RAILROAD.*; 



"The New York Central leads the world 

bail 



oonrniowT, mt, rr oconae t». outitu, acncfiAt MmeNacn hocht. 



1 



RECREA TION. 



XXXI 




"GET THERE" DUCKING BOAT, FITTED WITH GRASS BLINDS 



PLEASE write to us your 
opinion of 

mullins' "Get there" 
DucRing Boat 

as an all-around hunting 
boat. 

Hundreds now in use and 
we would like to hear from 
every user of this boat. 

If you have none send for 
catalogue with full descrip- 
tion, and place your order 
promptly. 

CORRESPONDENCE 
SOLICITED 

W. H. MULLINS 

228 Depot St., Salem, Ohio 



T 
H 

E 

E 
R 
A 
C 
R 
A 
P 
H 



-A-aNrxikiC^a-'rraEsi* pioturbb 



rf 




The only projecting apparatus ever offered at a low 
price that will give in perfection this latest and most 
popular form of amusement, pictures life-size and life- 
like in movement. Can be easily operated and is ready 
for immediate use, with powerful lamp, continuous 
films, and screen. Send for descriptive circular. 



tbe mw Vorfc talking machine *#%$* 

The Orchestra, The Orator, The SoSoist, 
are yours when you purchase "The New 
York Talking Hachine." Amuses the 
family and your friends. 
Price, ail complete, $6.00. Records, 50c. each 



C. NUTTING & CO., 83, D, NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK 



For Sale: Two large genuine Buffalo 
Robes, with heads and legs complete to 
hoofs. Sioux Indian tanned, and painted; 
one with sun and the other with animals, 
Indian signs and emblems, in colors. Were 
property of Chief in Sitting Bull's Village. 
Fur and pelts in perfect condition, scarcely- 
used. Will sell separate. Price satisfac- 
tory. 

I. N. Haley, care Recreation. 



Wanted: 10 gauge shot gun, in ex- 
change for fine old violin. Good field glass 
in exchange for camera. 

H. W. Kimball, 
13 Main Street, Haverhill, Mass. 



I went to see my German friend, and ob- 
served that while writing, in quest of fire- 
arms, to the Winchester Repeating Arms 
Co., he had addressed his letter as follows: 
" Vintskesstah Amms off der Rebeeding 
Fire Koombany." 

Geo. W. Bailey, Scientist and Artist, 
Oakville, St. Louis Co., Mo. 



" These Chinamen seem pretty honest 
sort of fellows." 

" Yes, they may iron, but they don't 
steel." 



Going Into Alaska? 



You want the 



Acme "Klondike Special" 

16«footboat, carries 1,500 lbs. 
easily. Folds into cylinder 5 =f t. 
long by 1 0=in. diameter. A man 
can pack one, a cayuse two. 




fflKBMBS" 



The Comptroller of N. W. M. Police, the Hon. 
Fred White, writes from Ottawa: "Those who have 
tested the Acme strongly recommend it. We have 
adopted the Ac7ne for our requirements." 

Major Walsh, Governor of Klondike, has a 14 -ft. 
Acme for his personal use. We have our third order 
from Canadian Gov. Send for photo of boat carrying 
ten persons, and for testimonials about Acmes, which 
safely ran the rapids of the Yukon and are now used 
in prospecting. Boats have outside Air Tubes. 
Bounce safely from snags and rocks. Better write 
at once. 

Acme Folding Boat Co. 

iliamlsburg, Ohio, U.S.A. 



XXX11 



RECREA TION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

I like Recreation more and more. Like good wine it 
improves with age. Just sent you 20 subscriptions, ob- 
tained by less than 2 hours' work. 

E. W. Smith, Buffalo, N. Y. 



I read Recreation regularly and have found it the best 
of its kind ever published. 

F. T. Fransioli, Memphis, Tenn. 



I never want to miss another copy of Recreation while 
I am above ground. 

A. A. Beckwith, St. Francis, Minn. 



I consider Recreation the finest magazine in the world 
and its manager the sportsmen's best friend and truest com- 
panion. G. Van Nostrand, Flushing, N. Y. 



It is a regular snap to get subscribers for Recreation. 
They all say it is " out of sight." 

Harry Wagner, Gladstone, 111. 



Each number of Recreation is better than the preced- 
ing one and I don't see how any sportsman can do without 
it. Burness Moyer, Hartford, Conn. 



Here is my $1 for Recreation. Might as well try to 
get along without "sox." 

J. W. Moxley, Barkerville, B. C. 



Enclosed please find P. O. Order for $1 for renewal to 
Recreation. I can not do without it. 

E. N. Hudson, Reedsburg, Wis. 



Could not get along without Recreation. If I could 
not get anything else like it would not stop it for the world. 
Geo. T. Norris, Torrington, Ct. 



All who have seen copies of Recreation think it the best 
sportsmen's publication that comes this way. 

Chas. H. Lynott, St. George, N. B. 



Recreation fills a yearning void in the heart of a lover 
of nature that no other magazine now published fills. 

Kenneth Fowler, Jersey City, N. J. 



Just received latest copy of Recreation and it is as near 
perfection as can be. I don't see how you can improve it. 
Elmer Breckenridge, Ashtabula, O. 



Recreation grows bigger and brighter every month and 
no sportsman's outfit is complete without it. 

Geo. H. Swift, Harbor Springs, Mich. 



Recreation is loaded to the muzzle with good things, 
well told and full of spice. 

Dr. Daniel B. Freeman, Chicago, 111. 



Recreation grows better with every number. Am al- 
ways waiting impatiently for it to come. 

F. Bonnet, Opelousas, La. 



I have taken Recreation a year and I think there is no 
other magazine so good. Everybddy should read it. 

B. F. Reeves, Worcester, Mass. 



I have not received latest copy of Recreation and can 
not possibly get along without it. Kindly send me same. 
J. F. Vallery, Chicago, 111. 



The copy of Recreation in the college Library here is 
worn out in 2 days. They can't let Recreation pass with- 
out reading it. F. Zimmerman, Manhattan, Kan. 

Recreation grows better all the time. After a while it 
will be lined with gold, if you keep on. 

Dwight Beaty, Waterville, Minn. 



It is no trouble to get subscribers for Recreation. I got 
61 in less than a week. F. L. Sanford, Omaha, Neb. 



Recreation is my favorite magazine. 

J. J. Schell, Mason City, la. 



Recreation is a beauty. I wish you every success with 
a magazine which meets the need of all sportsmen. 

S. M. Macdonald, Portage La Prairie, Manitoba. 

We think Recreation just right. The sporting news is 
always welcome and the pictures are perfect. 

Mrs. James Hanks, Earlham, la. 



All who have received Recreation are much pleased 
with it and I think it the finest sportsmen's magazinethat 
ever happened. P. B. Sprague, Denver, Col. 



Recreation improves with every issue. I am doing 
what I can to increase its circulation. 

Wm. W. Coleman, Carson City, Neb. 



Am much pleased with Recreation and think it the bes' 
journal published in the interest of outdoor sports and kin 
dred topics. Frank Hudson, Springfield, 111. 



Enclosed find $1, for which please send me Recreation 
another year. Can not get along without it now. 

Geo. W. Spaulding, Carritunk, Me. 

Recreation is the best sportsmen's periodical published. 
Its only fault is that it is too long between drinks. 

A. F. Crossman, No. Clarendon, Pa. 



I have been a reader of Recreation the past nine 
months and consider it the best periodical for sportsmen I 
have ever read. C. T. Stevenson, Dallas, Tex. 



Recreation is splendid and in many ways greatly su- 
perior to numerous higher priced magazines. 

Chas. G. Meekins, Baltimore, Md. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's journal published. 
Am much interested in the guns and ammunition depart- 
ment. E. A. Cross, Derry, N. H. 



Recreation is the best magazine of its kind I ever read 
and I sincerely hope it will reach the hands of every sports- 
man. F. M. Kever, Saegertown, Pa. 



I greatly enjoy reading Recreation, and don't stop until 
I have read it from cover to cover, advertisements and all. 
Mrs. V. J. Elliott, Jackson, Mich. 



My father takes Recreation and likes it very much. 
We children like to read it also. We call it the bear book. 
Willie J. Hawkins, Coal Creek,, Col. 



I like Recreation better than any other publication of 
its kind I have ever read. 

R. C. Sutton, Union City, Ind. 



I have read Recreation from the first number to date and 
think it the best sportsmen's journal published. 

S. E. Wright, Ft. Crook, Neb. 



Here is a money order for $3.00. I picked up these 3 
subscriptions in as many minutes. 

C. L. Flower, Greeley, Col. 

Recreation beats 'em all for giving the true inwardness 
of hunting in all its details. 

E. E. Pinkham, Freeport, Me. 



Recreation is one of the brightest and best magazines 
for sportsmen that I have ever seen. 

G. P. Kimberly, Belding, Mich. 



Recreation is a splendid publication, the best of its kind. 
J. L. Von Blon, Marion, O. 



Don't think there is a better magazine out than Recrea- 
tion. P. E. Paulsen, St. Paul, Minn. 



I got 17 subscribers to-day, in 2 hours. Can easily get as 
many more. Rev. G. D. Bayne, Pembroke, Ont. 



No true sportsman can be without Recreation. 

M. L. Effinger, Calumet, Mich. 



RECREA TION. 



XXXlll 



LITTLE CIAHT TYPEWRITERS 1ft? 

mWITEINBOOKM 'PAPER. 
PACKAGE. AHYTHM. 

Send for 
Circular 



INTERCHANGEABLE 
TYPE PLATES. 




4 SENT BY MA/C OR EXPRESS 

ON RECEIPT OF $ US 



" I thought you told me you could do 
plain sewing? " 

" So I can, ma'am." 

" Look at those stitches, I can see them 
clear across the room." 

" Well, ain't that plain enough?"— Truth. 



PLAYS 



and other Entertainment Books 

Send for 120-page catalogue free. 
Dramatic Publishing Co., Chicago 



ETHICS 
OF 



llllllfi&Ml | l|iM 

A bold, brave book teaching ideal marriage, rights ol 
the unborn child , a designed and controlled maternity. 

Union Signal : Thousands of women have blessed 
Dr. Stockham for Tokology, thousands of men and 
women will bless her for Karezza. 

Arena : Karezza is worth its weight in gold. 
Sample pages free. Agents Wanted. Prepaid $1.00. 
ALICE B. STOCKHAM & CO., 277 MADISON ST., CHICAGO. 



TRY IT FREE 

for 30 days in your own home and 
' save $10 to $25. No money in advance. 
$60 Kenwood Machine for $23.00 

$50 Arlington Mackine for . $19.50 
Singers (Made by us) $8, $11.50, $15 
and 27 other styles. All attachments 
FREE. We pay fr» «eht. Buy from 
factory. Sa.ve agents large profits. 
Over 100,000 in use. Catalogue and 
_ ... _J, testimonials Free. Write at once. 
5#o>inT „ Address (in full), CASH BUYERS' UNION 
158-164 West Tan Buren St., BS59 Chicago, I1L 




L. L. Bates, General Delivery, Seattle, 
Wash., offers his services as guide for hunt- 
ing, exploring, and prospecting parties in 
Alaska. He has lived in that Territory 8 
years, has travelled many thousands of 
miles through the interior, and is prepared 
to give accurate and reliable information 
concerning it. 

References: Lieut. G. T. Emmons, U. S. 
Navy, Naval Dept, Washington, D. C; 
Will D. Jenkins, Secretary of State, Olym- 
pia, Wash., and the editor of Recreation. 

Correspondence promptly answered. 

Will return to Alaska in March, '98. 



" My dear friend," said Mr. Soully, to 
the cannibal chief, shortly after his arrival, 
" can you tell me the number of my breth- 
ren who have preceded me, and what be- 
came of them? " 

" Certainly," replied the chief, " they 
were just ate." 



ASHLAND 
HOUSE 



FOURTH AVE. 
and 24th ST. 

Two blocks from 
Madison Sg. Garden 



...HEADQUARTERS FOR SPORTSMEN 

American and m » 

European Plan 

RATES: 

Rooms, with board, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 per day 
Rooms, without board, - $1.00 and upwards 
Breakfast, 75 cents 

Lunch, - - - • 5° 

Table d* Hote Dinner, - 75 " 



FOR SALE: 

propagating 




Living wild animals 
and game birds, for 
purposes ; Elk, Deer, Jack 
Rabbits, Fox 
Squirrels, 
Quails 
(Western 
birds only), 
etc. I do not 
handle dead 
game. 

Address CHAS. PAYNE 

BOX 913 WICHITA, KANSAS 



ALASKAN VIEWS 

Take a look at the country, and the methods of 
travel, before you start for the gold fields. 

A full series of views of Juneau, Dyea, Skaguay, 
ChilkatPass, Miners and outfits, along the route, etc. 
50 cents each. An assorted doz. $5.00 
Send for Catalogue of Alaska Curios. 

GEO. G. CANT WELL, Taxidermist, Juneau, Alaska. 



WANTED.— LIVE MOOSE, CARIBOU, BLACKTAIL 
Y,r deer, beaver, etc., for Litchfield Park, Adiron- 
dacks. Address, with particulars, EDWARD H. 
LITCHFIELD, 59 Wall Street, New York. 



Blair's Pills 

Great English Remedy for 

GOUT and RHEUMATISM. 



-Jl-&~: 



SAFE, SURE, EFFECTIVE. /*£& MM U » j||U ' 

iDruggists, or 224 William St., New York . Q2m**^mm > 

L| >f t T , TTTTTTTT TT TTTTT ¥ '« _• flrc l 




IN ANSWERING ADS, IF YOU 
WILL KINDLY MENTION REC- 
REATION YOU WILL GREATLY 
OBLIGE THE EDITOR 



XXXIV 



RECREA TION. 



TAXIDERMIST AND SCULPTOR 




Taxidermists' Supplies 



GEO. H. STORCK 
123 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



HIGH ART IN TAXIDERMY 

I have, by my new method of mounting animals, by 
combining Sculptury with Taxidermy, obtained results 
that by no other method have ever been attained. 

THE BEST sport to be found in 
Florida ; Creek Navigation, from 
the Lake Region to the Everglades. 

Write, and come to 

CARSON BROS., Frostproof, Florida 




LYMAN'S RIFLE SIGHTS. 

Send for 96 Page Catalogue of 

Sights anl Fine 

WILLIAM LYMAN, Mlddlefield, Conn. 



A Practical Common Sense Camp Stove. 

In 6 Sizes. Patent applied for. 

The lightest, most com* 
pact, practical camp 
stove made; either with 
or without oven. Won't 
get out of shape, com- 
bination cast and sheet 
steel top, smooth body, 
heavy lining, telescopic 
pipe carried inside the 
stove. 

Burns largest wood, keeps fire longest of any 
stove made. For full particulars address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, IIL 




When you get 
a good speci- 
men of bird, 
fish, mammal 
etc., that you 
would like to 
get mounted, 
send it to us. We 
will do it right and 
also make the price 
right. 

Send five cents for 
new Taxidermists' 
Catalogue. 



Artificial 



Taxidermist, 

217 Madison St., Chicago. 




We prepare 
and mount all 
specimens of 
natural histo- 
ry true to na- 
ture, in the 
best style ot 
the Taxider- 
mist's art, at 
reasonable 
prices. 
We also keep a 
complete line of 

Oologists' 
and 

Entomo 9 
legists' 
Supplies 




Ernest L. Brown 

The Minnesota 
Taxidermist 

Does true and artistic work 
at reasonable figures. 

WARREN, MINN. 



7INE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 
' BIRDS, ETC., for sale at unheard-of prices. 

Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine. 



Cliatfield Flies. 

It's the desire of the maker of Chatfield flies 
to make an article unexcelled in quality, and to 
sell at a reasonable price. Poor flies will not 
be sold at any price. Full particulars and 
sample for 10c. stamps or silver. 
E. G. CHATFIELD, 
Not Oswego. 49 Front St., Owego, N. Y. 



Impatient Old Party — Is the editor inr 

Office Boy — Nope. 

Impatient Old Party — Where is he? 

Office Boy — Dunno; committed suicide 
last night. 

Impatient Old Party — Heavens! Is it 
possible? What for? 

Office Boy — Took a tombstone on ad- 
vertising, and couldn't see any other way 
to get the benefit of it. — Truth. 



BROOK TROUT 

We have a large number of extra fine 
yearling trout for sale at Extremely 
Low Prices. For particulars address 

The Blue Hills Trout Preserve Co. 

Box 1373 MMRIDEN. CONN. * 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 



THIS fRIENDLYf ACE 



is PLEASED to ANNOUNCE to 

ALL SHOOTERS 

of RIFLES, PISTOLS or SHOT GUNS 

that |J AA | U AM J DaaI# Ma O is J ust out - JI 6 pa^es of solid in- 
the lUG3i ilaiSQ-DlJOSi BlUa 9 formation about Nitro, Smokeless and 
Black Powders, how to use them in various arms to get the best results. It is 
the recognized authority on all matters relating to Shooting. You can't afford to be 
without it. Mailed to any part of the world. Your address with two 2 Cent Stamps to 

IDEAL MANUFACTURING CO-, New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

WHEN YOU WRITE KINDLY MENTION « RECREATION " 




Sectional View 





Globe Bearing. 



Don' t believe imitators of "HENDRYX" standard 

goods when they say their Fishing Reels "are NOW 

as good as HENDRYX". The fact that they 

imitate proves the * "HENDRYX" is the recognized 

standard line of Fishing Reels. Ask your dealer for 

them. 
The Andrew B. Hendrvx Co., New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 




Th'is is a picture of Sewell New- 
house, inventor of the celebrated 

NEWHOUSE STEEL TRAPS 

known the world over as the 
best traps made for catching fur- 
bearing animals. Send to 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd., Kenwood, N. Y. 

for catalogs, prices and discounts. 





Shoes: Made of best 
and the best hickory 



raw 
that 



Web Snow 

caribou skin, 
grows. 

Thongs thoroughly twisted and carefully 
woven. I make the best snow-shoe in the 
market. They look well, wear well, hang 
well and will not bag, in wet snow. 

A. M. Dunham, Norway, Me. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF THE PRE- 
MIUMS. 

The Manhattan hand camera, which I received from you 
as premium, arrived in due season and I hereby tender my 
sincere thanks for your gift. The camera is much admired 
by all my friends and I am quite envied its possession. 

Mrs. H. D. Warner, Hackensack, N. J. 



The Ithaca hammerless gun you sent, for 35 subscriptions, 
received O. K. Am highly pleased with it, as are all who 
have seen it. Please accept my thanks. 

W. H. Smith, Detroit, Mich. 



I received the Hawk-Eye camera promptly and thank you 
for it. It is a valuable instrument and fully pays me for my 
work. A. E. Trask, Little Falls, N. Y. 



I received the 30-30 Marlin rifle as premium for 28 sub- 
scriptions and thank you sincerely. It is the finest finished 
and best balanced rifle I ever had in my hands, and every 
one who has seen it thinks the same. Several of my friends 
think of getting one like it. 

W. P. Springer, Northfield, Vt. 



I have used my new Shattuck premium gun 3 times and 
have one fault to find with it. It kills squirrels so dead they 
drop down and lodge in a crotch of the tree, and don't have 
life enough to kick out. I waited 5 minutes for the wind to 
blow hard enough to blow one out. I was about 7 rods dis- 
tant. F. C. Barnes, Plymouth, Conn. 



Received the Korona camera for 25 subscriptions. Am 

well pleased with it and heartily thank you for it. Shall 

always be a friend to Recreation and shall be pleased to 

do whatever I can to advance your interests in this section. 

F. S. Cobb, Attleboro, Mass. 



I had a chance to use my Bristol rod in Livingston lake, 
in the Adirondacks, and landed 2 large fish. If a man can't 
land a fish with a Bristol rod he must look out or the fish 
will land him. It is a beauty. 

F. D. Levens, Ft. Edward, N. Y. 



Allow me to thank you for your kindness and promptness 
in sending my premium, a Davenport shot gun. I have 
given it a good test, with shells loaded by the U. M. C 
Co. , and it shoots splendidly, at 80 yards. I was agreeably 
surprised. Dr. H. A. Jones, Howard, R. I. 



xxxvi RECREA TION. 



Jfitics Manufacturing £ompany m 

CHICOPEE, MASS. 

Established S828 Bicycles ma.de continuously since t88i 



This old and reliable firm 
offer as good a 



. . Bicycle ♦ . 



as money and skill will pro- 
duce, at the moderate price of 



$75 



.00 



Ladies' Bicycles 28-inch wheels, single tube, drop frame 
Ladies' Bicycles 28-inch wheels, double curved drop frame 
Gent's Bicycles 22, 24, 26-inch frame 



Ji LL material of the very best. Tubing all cold drawn seamless. All con- 
nections, Cranks, Sprockets, made of drop steel forcings. Frames have 
three coats baking enamel* Nickel parts are first coppered. Removable 
sprockets. Dust-proof bearings. Front fork sides seamless. There is not a 
stamping, a casting of any kind, or a piece of brazed tubing in any of our 
bicycles. We guarantee the material and the workmanship to be first-class. 
Have a few 1897 bicycles which we will close out at special low prices. 

Send for our 1897 Bicycle Catalogue 



RECREATION. 



XXXVll 




We Have No 
Agents 

Xou Save the profits 
of Dealers, Hgents, 

omoati v 22*2; iui^nt 

^^ ■ ■ ■ r^** 7 tnen cy purchasing 

DIRECT from the Manufacturer 

JNo Better CQheels JMade than the Guaranteed f& 

Acme High Grade Bicycles 

Write for Catalogue and Discounts 

P. Hill, President HCIHC C^ClC COHipaiiy 

J. L. Broderick, Vice-Pres. Department R 

F.K. Thompson, Secretary. ELKHART, INDIANA 

Eight stylish models ; beautiful finish ; elegant equip- 
ment. WHOLESALE PRICES. We ship anywhere 
with the privilege of EXAMINATION, pay express 
charges both ways and REFUND YOUR MONEY if 
the wheels are not as represented. We agree to RE a 
PLACE OR REPAIR any broken or defective Acme 
bicycle, or broken or defective part, within six months 
from date of shipment, AND NO QUESTIONS 
ASKED. 



./v 



f v 



VA 



CLEVELAND BICYCLES. 

Standard for Quality, and 

More Popular than Ever. 

A SPLENDID RECORD ! 
We Introduced the.... 

FIRST safety bicycle of standard 

type. 
FIRST bicycle of light weight and 

narrow tread. 
FIRST cross-thread fabric tire. 

Strong and resilient. 
FIRST bicycle chain with hardened 

block and pin. 
FIRST dust-proof, ball-retaining 

bearing. (Burwell). 
FIRST bicycles with frames built 
of large tubing. 
OUR '98 FEATURE:— Improved Bur- 
well bearings with self-oiling de- 
vice. On Clevelands only. 

...'98 MODELS, $50, $65, $75... 

H. A. L0Z1ER&C0., Mfrs., 

Catalogue " f • • free. Cleveland, Ohio. 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA, SAN 
FRANCISCO, LONDON, PARIS, HAMBURG. 



A LINE THAT MEETS EVERY REQUIREMENT 

in Price and Quality 

Sterling Gales 



Chainless, $125.00 

Chain Wheels, $75.00 and $60.00 



$50.00 and $60.00 



Every Up-to-date Feature 
Highest Grade 



Dimik 



$35.00 and $45.00 



Gotham 



A Wheel for the Multitude 
Handsome in Appearance 
Durable in Construction 



For the Children 



24-inch 
26-inch 



$25.00 
30.00 



SCHOVERLING, DALY & GALES 

.302 Broadway, New York 






XXXV111 



RECREATION. 



1 I 

s 

s 

3 




c 



© 

© 
© 
© 



© 
© 

© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 



© 



Every 



Sportsman 
Should 



Have a 



WATER-PROOF 

TENT 



SEND FOR CIRCULAR R, SAMPLES OP MATERIALS AND PRICE-LIST TO 



O 

9 

9 






a 



% 



9 



A camper knows the advantages of a tent that is an absolute protection against rain 

and dampness. We secure this advantage by OUR water-proof PROCESS and $ 

avoid the extra bulk and weight of a fly. $ 

We make tents of all sizes, shapes and materials, suited to the needs of hunters. 8 

campers, travellers, canoeists ; also 5 

Water-Proof Sleeping Bags 

CANVAS BUCKETS, AMMUNITION, PROVISION, 

CLOTHING AND SADDLE BAGS, POUCHES, 

PACKS, BICYCLE COVERS, FLOOR CLOTHS, 

and many other Canvas Specialties 

Olir SlCCDillfif BtiSf * s umc l ue > excellent in pattern and finish, and has been § 

highly approved. 



3 



DAVID T.ABERCROMBIE& CO. 



36 South Street, New York 



^^wwwuuwww^uwwwwwwwwwww^wwwwwuuuwtuwwwuWttuwuoo©d4A>owwadWW 



RECREA TION. xxxix 



w % 

% We Guarantee | 

its Satisfaction v>/ 

W If you buy the original, \|/ 

/is — - — — - — iH 

ylw practical and light-weight ^ 

I pnwood n § 

| !L SLEEPING BAGS | 

1 by thoosands of prospectors, Hunters, Fishermen w 

* f 

/(S All over the world, in all sorts of climates, wet w 

;!; or dry, warm or cold, or all together. Seamless ?K 

}i\ — no draughts — it is a perfect protector and w 

^N assures health and comfort. Cleans easily and W 

J£ is sanitary. Made for use — needs no repairs— X 

/JS is practical and becomes indispensable. Makes yff 

*{j a small light roll easy to carry. Three bags — 

JL use one or more as necessary. Take one with 

tjfjk you whether to the Klondike or the Spring Sjff 

& outing. Sit 

| The Kenwood Storm-Hood STtttZlZXZ W 

rl\ a perfect protection against cold anc wind. \f/ 






The Kenwood Hunting-Cape ZT?? m E£Z£ g 

^P the sportsman. Unusual warmth with lightness and perfect freedom of motion. 71? 

/l\ M> 

^T: i j i ) rj ij samples and illustrated vlv 

W rivDC circular about these goods M/ 

As THE KENWOOD MILLS, - - Albany, N. Y. $ 

^•^- ^;. -^ .^ j£ jt; ^ ^ -g. < •< ; • ■■S -'C-g- ■g-g-> g--C;>g ;- ^-^ ;-C-S-'g=;^ 



xl RECREATION. 



Camping a*" 



Camp Outfits 

A MANUAL OP INSTRUCTION FOR YOUNO 
AND OLD SPORTSMEN. 

Edited by G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

Author of "CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," •• HUNTINO IN THE 
OREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIO HOLE," "THE BIO GAME OF 
NORTH AI1ERICA," " THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOO," 
"AI1ERICAN GAME FISHES," ETC. 



12mo. 200 Pages. 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



CHIS book contains practical points on how to dress for Hunting, Fishing, or other Camping 
Trips; what to carry in the way of extra Clothing, Bedding, Provisions, Cooking Utensils, and 
all classes of Camp Equipage; how to select Camp Sites; how to make Camp Fires; how to 
build Temporary Shelters; what to do in case of Getting Lost, etc. It contains check lists of articles 
constituting Complete Camping Outfits; a list of the names and addresses of Guides, in various 
hunting and fishing countries, and much other information of value to Campers, and which has never 
before been given to the public. 

The instructions given are based on an experience of twenty-five years in Camping, and in the 
study of Camp Lore, Woodcraft, etc., and it is believed that the work will prove of great value to 
thousands of men and boys, who have not had such favorable opportunities for study. 
The book also contains a Chapter by 

DR. CHARLES GILBERT DAVIS, on CAMP HYGIENE, MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

ONE) BY 

COL. J. FRY LAWRENCE, on CAMP COOKERY, 

AND ONE BY 

FRANK F. FRISBIE on THE DIAMOND HITCH, or HOW TO LOAD A PACK HORSE 



This book should be in the library of every Sportsman, and will be sent, post-paid, on receipt 
of price, by the Author, 

Q. O. Shields, 19 W. 24th St., New York. 
Given as a Premium for Four Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREA 770 N. 



xli 



The 4 Leading Electric Novelties 



Jl 5 -2 I 




B/rf® 




Battery Table Lamp 
$2.75 complete. 



Necktie Light. Dollar Motor. 

We undersell all on Everything: Electrical 
OHIO ELECTRIC WORKS, CLEVELAND, O. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR ELECTRIC NOVELTIES $6.oo Bicycle Lights, $2.50 

AGENTS WANTED SEND FOR 1898 CATALOGUE, JUST OUT 




SOME GOOD GUIDES. 

FLORIDA. 

C. L. Farnham, Avon Park, bear, deer, turkeys, quails, 

ducks, black bass, etc. 
Oliver Tinny, Ozona, Hillsboro Co., deer, bear, turkeys, 

quails, ducks and salt-water fishing. 

E. M. Reynolds, Fort Myers, ditto 

Wm. Webb, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

Frank Guptill, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

W. J. Meyer, Tarpon Springs, , " 

Frank Carson, Ft. Meyers, " 

E. T. Robinson, Keuka, " 
Carson Bros., Frostproof, " 
J. L. Sandlin, Punta Gorda, " 
Oliver Archer, Clearwater, " 
L. W. Scroggins, Homeland, * l 
Capt. Jas. Argo, Oviedo, " 

F. J. Adams, Sanford, " 
C. B. Bailey, Winter Haven, " 
W. H. Steacy, Pt. Tampa City, " 
Wm. J. Lyon, Interlacken, " 
L. L. Sutton, Sutherland, ** 
M. B. Carson, Frostproof, Polk Co., " 
W. D. Isler, Eagle Lake, " 
George W. Hawthorn, Hawthorn, " 
C. H. Hill, Maitland, 

J. E. Bowen, Laughman, '• 

Margan Baes, Kissimmee, " 

B. C. Lanier, Leesburg, . <l 

John Hunter, Winter Park, •' 
H. Shipman, Haskell, deer, bear, turkeys, quails, ducks 

and salt-water fishing. 

Robert James, Emporia, ditto 

Alex. Brown, Martin, " 

W. J. McCullough, Boardman, " 

Frank Smith, St. James City " 

Jinks McCreary, Higly, " 

Baldwin Cassady, Lisbon, *' 
W. H. Howell, Centre Hill, 

Ed. Brown, Dunedin, " 

G. B. Lawson, Lake Maitland, *• 
J. H. Maddox, Wauchula, " 
Will Montgomery, Arcadia, " 
T. E. Fielder, Calvinia, " 
W. F. Hays, Webster, '« 
John Beidler, Gabrielle, " 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Fenner S. Jarvis, Haslin P. O., deer, bear, turkeys and 

quails. 

Robert Waterfield, Knotts Island, ditto 



Jas. Tooly, Belleport, 



C. Halsted, Currituck C. H., deer, turkeys, quails, 
ducks, salt-water fishing. 

Fred. Latham, Haslin, ditto 

VIRGINIA. 

M. Corbel, Virginia Beach, geese, brant, ducks, shore 

birds, quails, salt-water fishing. 

Captain R. E. Miles, Machipongo, ditto 

C. A. Spencer, Buckingham, " 

M. A. Barner, Clarksville, " 



WHAT THEY SAY OF THE PRE- 
MIUMS. 

„, The Davenport single shot gun you sent me as premium 
for 15 yearly subscriptions to Recreation arrived safe. 
Few words are best. It is a little beauty, and a close, hard 
shooting gun. I patterned it to-day at 35, 40 and 45 yards, 
and could have killed a red squirrel 9 times out of 10. Shall 
continue to work for Recreation, the best sportsmen's 
magazine on earth, and shall get up another club. 

W. S. Mead, Woodstock, N. Y. 



The Bo-Peep B. camera, for 15 subscriptions, arrived 
O. K. To say I am pleased with the camera and with your 
courteous treatment of me is putting it mildly. The camera 
does perfect work and speaks well for the manufacturers 
and for your way of doing business. I had no trouble 
whatever in getting the 15 subscriptions. 

Edw. G. Weber, Millville, N. J. 



My premium automatic reel is a star and I couldn't do 
without it. At first it was a little awkward but now it beats 
the earth. Wouldn' t take $50 for it and do without it. I 
send you a thousand thanks for furnishing so fine a pre- 
mium. Shall corral some more subscribers for the cheapest 
and best magazine I know of. 

H. H. Garr, Columbia Falls, Mont. 



The premium gold watch came to hand promptly and the 
recipient is delighted with it. I do not see how you can 
afford such prizes. It is not work to take subscriptions to 
Recreation but pleasure, for who are more talkative than 
sportsmen over their favorite, be it dog, gun or paper. 

Jno. Boyd, Toronto, Ont. 



Have just been to Grand Lake on my annual fishing trip. 
Had a good time, caught our legal number of fish and re- 
turned well pleased with our trip. I used the steel rod 
altogether and caught some big fish with it. Take pleasure 
in recommending it to my friends. 

J. M. Kerr, Milltown, N. B. 



I feel grateful to you for sending me such a beautiful little 
gun. It is not only a beauty in looks but in shooting quali- 
ties, as it has already bagged n squirrels, 7 partridges and 
2 rabbits. The Syracuse people took great pains to have it 
please me. Mrs. H. L. Darling, Guilford, N. Y. 



The Manhattan camera which you sent me for 12 sub- 
scriptions to Recreation was received in due time and I 
thank you heartily for it. It is a fine instrument and worth 
much more than the time spent in getting the subscriptions. 
Claude Middaugh, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Received the Bristol steel rod O. K. and am well pleased 
with it. Everyone thinks it beautiful. Everyone here who 
is a subscriber to Recreation thinks it the best sportsmen's 
magazine published. K. G. Ferrall, Columbiana, O. 



IN ANSWERING ADS ALWAYS 
MENTION RECREATION. 



xlii 



RECREA TION. 




(Bcfla it R tad tad both wayt ) 



•» 00 4 »**■. i0e » Cort* 
C 0,> BHiELOB (COQUINAk 



Ui*Ot •*• ■ !«■!»■ 



Oct, 14, 1897. 



TELEPHONE 8330- 18tb«T 



National Gramophone Co., 

674 Broadsay, City, 
Oear Sirs:- 

I have had one of your Gramophones all summer at "Recreation 
Camp" on the Shrewsbury river, and have, with Prof, Hornaday, Director of 
the New York Zoological Park, tested Its capabilities thoroughly, and while 
it is a wonderful instrument, it does not fulfill what your representative 
claimed for it when he sold it to me. He stated that it could be heard 
distinctly for half a mile. He was either misrepresenting matters, or 
the particular instrument which he sold me is not up to the mark, for we 
found that it did not reproduce a cornet solo satisfactorily at a greater 
distance than a quarter of a mile, although this was done, I must admit, 
perfectly. 

If your new instruments have any Improvements over the one I now 
have, I should like to exchange mine for a new one, paying any reasonable 
difference in price* 

Your, truly, * A-^-fl?. 

Edr. and Mngr. 
lVowvN~t 



1\M- 






RECREA TION. 



xliii 



WHAT THEY SAY OF THE PRE- 
MIUMS. 

I received the Davenport rifle, and am delighted with it. 
All of my subscribers are much pleased with Recreation. 

I shot at a target as big as a dollar, ioo feet away, and 
hit it 2 out of 3 times. Am only 13 years old but love out- 
door sport, especially hunting. I have a shot gun and two 
rifles. Am going to try for a Marlin repeater. 

E. P. Smith, Richmond, Ky. 



Am well satisfied with the Forehand gun you sent me. 
Have done some remarkable shooting with it on wild geese 
and partridges. My gun not only looks well but is a hard 
shooter. All the subscribers are highly pleased with Rec- 
reation, and several have told me they will subscribe next 
year also. A. T. Baker, 67 Frank st., Lowell, Mass. 



The 40 subscribers I got you are delighted with Recre- 
ation and greatly admire the premium you so kindly gave 
me for so little trouble. The 30-30 Marlin with Lyman 
sights is a fine, all-around gun, and Recreation is a great, 
all-around slugger against the game hogs. 

Geo. E. Kezer, Newburyport, Mass. 



The gun ordered by you of the Ithaca Gun Co., as a pre- 
mium for my daughter, came to hand in good condition. I 
am puzzled to see how you can give such valuable pre- 
miums, but I see you do. It is a beautiful little firearm and 
I am sure a good one. Accept thanks. 

F. Cauthorn, Portland, Or. 



Accept my thanks for the Premo B. camera which you 
sent me as premium. Out of 5 pictures I have taken I 
have 4 good ones and one fair. This camera is well worth 
20 subscriptions to any one wanting a first-class instrument. 

Ben Lichty, Waterloo, la. 



I found the steel rod satisfactory and endorse it for all- 
around use. It is good for bass, trout and frogs, with bait 
or flies ; and while it may not be just the thing to pole a 
boat with, it is good for everything else. My compliments 
to the makers. A. F. Rice, Passaic, N. J. 



I received the Davenport rifle for 10 subscriptions and 
am much obliged. To say it pleases me is putting it mildly. 
I don't see how you can possibly give such premiums in re- 
turn for subscriptions. 

H. Brackinridge, Philadelphia, Pa. 



I received my Syracuse gun O. K. and it is just what I 
ordered. Am greatly pleased with it. I tried it yesterday 
and find it the best gun I ever put to my shoulder. It 
shoots strong and makes a good pattern. 

Wm. J. West, Haverhill, Mass. 



The Davenport rifle you sent me as premium for 10 sub- 
scriptions to your bright and interesting book has arrived 
safe and is duly appreciated. I think it a beauty and shall 
try for other premiums. H. C. Hill, Haverhill, Mass. 

Accept my thanks for the Syracuse gun which you sent 
me for 35 subscriptions to Recreation. It is a beautiful 
little gun, surely more than I looked for, and I am much 
pleased with it. Geo. J. Kebil, Gettysburg, Pa. 



Accept my thanks for the Marlin rifle. It seems more like 
a present than a premium, for I did so little work to obtain 
it. It is an elegant rifle and a great credit to the makers. 
L. A. Lander, Newburyport, Mass. 

I. received my Bristol steel rod in good shape and am 
much pleased with it. I consider it a lucky rod, as my first 
catch was a 3-lb pike, and the rod worked it to perfection. 
J. A. Norris, Carbondale, Pa. 

I used the Bristol rods lately and cannot say too much in 
praise of them. Thank you sincerely for putting me in the 
way of securing such useful and valuable premiums. 

S. B. Kauffman, Lima, O. 



I received the Hawk-Eye camera O. K. and thank you 
sincerely for it. It is an object of admiration among my 
friends and gives perfect satisfaction. 

Wm. H. Beaumont, Little Falls, N. Y. 



I see no better way of obtaining a good gun than to leave 
it to your judgment to select one as premium for a list of 
subscribers ; as everyone obtaining a gun in that way says 
it is better than he could buy for the same money. 

Dr. B. Garret, Oxford, Idaho. 

A few days ago I received a Kenwood sleeping bag as 
premium for subscriptions I sent you. It is elegant and I 
am sure every sportsman who has the pleasure of using one 
will say as much. S. E. Overfield, Ft. Scott, Kans. 



I received my Baby Wizard camera last Friday and to say 
I am pleased is mild. I thank you sincerely for your kind- 
ness. I expect to continue working for Recreation. It 
speaks for itself. Wm. W. Weeks. Seneca Falls, N. Y. 



The 30-30 Marlin rifle you so kindly sent me for 28 sub- 
scriptions was received promptly and I am well pleased with 
it. Accept my thanks. The Marlin people make a hand- 
some rifle. W. W. Worthen, Mandan, N. Dak. 



The Bristol steel rod sent by you for n subscriptions is 
a beauty and I hope to soon get out and catch a trout. 
Recreation improves every month. 

Norman A. Wood, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



Received the No. 4 Bull's-Eye camera from the Eastman 
people last week, and when I think how easy it was to get 
the subscriptions, I realize the" value of the fine premium. 
A. P. Simmons, Troy, N. Y. 



I received my Premo A. camera Monday morning. Am 
much pleased with it and so is everyone to whom I have 
shown it. It was an easy way to get such a fine camera. 
W. D. Bowers, Hartford, Conn. 



The 30-30 Marlin rifle, which you sent me as premium, 
arrived safe and to say I am pleased with it but mildly ex- 
presses my admiration. Thank you for it and for your 
prompt attention. Roy O. Yates, Oakland, Calif. 



The Hollenbeck gun you sent me for 35 subscriptions is a 
beauty. It shoots as hard as a gun that costs twice as 
much, and I thank you sincerely for it. 

J. B. Wyman, Chadron, Nebr. 



The Yawman and Erbe Automatic reel came yesterday 
and is a star for looks. Will try it in a day or two and 
write you of results. Many thanks for your promptness. 
H. H. Garr, Columbia Falls, Mont. 



Received the Pony Premo Sr. camera as premium for 40 
subscriptions to Recreation. It is a beauty and is ad- 
mired by all to whom I have shown it. Please accept my 
sincere thanks for it. F. L. Wilcox, Asbury Park, N. J. 



I received the Cyclone camera and feel well paid for the 
subscriptions. Recreation is the best magazine of its 
kind in America. My subscribers all like it. 

George Foulkes, Mansfield, Mass. 



I received the No. 4 Bristol steel rod which you sent me 
for 10 subscribers to Recreation, gave it a fair trial on a 
few black bass and pickerel, and find it all right. I rec- 
ommend it highly. J. S. Leonard, Lockport, N. Y. 

The Bristol steel rod reached me this a.m. and I am much 
pleased with it. It could not be better; just suits me. Ac- 
cept my thanks. W. H. Dooley, Indianapolis, Ind. 

I received the Premo B. camera all right and have given 
it a good trial. Am much pleased with it, as I am with 
Recreation. L. K. Paine, Cumberland Mills, Me. 



I tried the Syracuse gun received as premium and it is 
beautiful. It shoots strong and I am much obliged for it. 
H. E. Beutner, Winona, Minn. 



Recreation gave me a new Adlake camera and I am 
much pleased with it ; also with the magazine. _ 

H. S. Vogler, Young America, Minn. 



I received the Bristol rod for subscriptions recently mailed 
you. It is a beauty and will no doubt be serviceable. 

W. R. Coleman, Massillon, 0. 



xliv 



RECREA TION. 




«Lfie>rj»lfiHT 16 8 4 



AND CAMP 

OUTFITS 

We manufacture the largest and most 
complete line of tents in the country, 
and our goods are celebrated for their 
wearing and waterproof qualities* 

Send 4 cents in stamps for our new 
40-page illustrated catalogue showing 
all styles of Tents and Camp furniture, 

GEO. B. CARPENTER & CO. 

202 to 210 S. Water Street, CHICAGO 

Established 1840. 



"Simply Phenomenal 



♦> 



Lieut. F. C. WILSON 

Company C, First Bat. Inf., Ga. Vol. 

speaks thus of 

King's $emh Smokeless 
.Powder,,, 



♦♦< 



Lieut. Wilson won the 

WIMBLEDON CUP 

30 Shots, 1,000 Yards 

The only powder that gives highest velocity 
without stripping lead bullet. 

J\ Perfect Rifle ana $bot=6im Powder 

Ask for circular and name of dealer nearest you, 
who sells it. 

THE KING POWDER CO, 

CINCINNATI, O. 

Manufacturers also of KING'S SMOKELESS, QUICK- 
SHOT, and BLASTING POWDERS. 



MARLIN 



DOUBLE 

ACTION 




REVOLVERS 



All Parts of. 

DROP FORGED STEEL 



Perfect in Finish 



Unsurpassed 
in Accuracy 



MADE IN 32 and 38 CALIBRES, WITH 3% INCH BARREL 

Blued or Nickel Finish 

sJtSiue The Marlin Fire Arms Co*, New Haven, Conn. 



Send 



RECREA TION. xlv 



Dog =f 




i 



Mr. Polk Miller, the widely-known 
Richmond, Va., druggist, who probably 
knows as much about dogs as any man 
in America, has just written a new book 
entitled "Dogs — Their Ailments — How to Treat Them." 



Book^ i 

6 

8 entitled " Dogs — Their Ailments— How to Treat Them." gL. 

The book fully covers the subjects of Distemper, Worms, Mange, %M 

Skin Diseases and the other ailments which attack the canine race. £% 

8 The book contains information that all dog owners ought to know. jF 

A copy will be sent free to every reader of this paper who writes to «jr 

the Polk Miller Drug Co., Richmond, Va., and requests it. gL 

8 Sergeant's Condition Pills A 

While the book treats largely upon the diseases of dogs, it also sets jtii 

forth the proper treatment of them. This naturally includes a refer- C# 

Ml ence to Sergeant's Condition Pills, which are just as widely known ^L 

%f as Mr. Polk Miller himself. lUr 

8 This remedy restores luster to a sick dog's eyes — his appetite and J^ 

ambition come back — he " braces up," as it were, and is himself again, ^m 

The good effects are apparent at once. Improvement can be noticed &% 

right away, and a complete restoration to health and strength follows. j£ 

Price $i.oo a box. At dealers' or sent by mail prepaid. ym 

8 Sergeant's Sure Shot %w 

has been used for more than thirty years. There has never been a C# 

£L case where, if properly administered, this remedy has failed to de- mL 

\m stroy every vestige of worm growth in dogs. It has no equal. %w 

m\ Price 50 cents. By mail prepaid. mm 

%% Sergeant's Carbolic Soft Soap %% 

W% destroys that disagreeable mangy smell of closely confined dogs, «» 

jK and effectually rids their bodies of Fleas, Lice and other vermin. jfi 

%M 25 cents Sm 

& & 

ykM Manufactured by the wW 

A Polk Miller Drug Co., =:= Richmond, Va. A 




xlvi 



RECREA TION. 



NEW MODEL REVOLVER 

Has important advantages over all other makes. Rebounding Lock, which obviates all liability 
of accidental discharge when closing, after discharging cylinder. Simple and superior method of 
holding cylinder to barrel. Can be removed instantly by pressing a catch in front of the cylinder. 




"Workmanship unexcelled. All parts interchangeable, and made from drop forgings. Frame 
is made of cast steel. No malleable iron about it. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Mention Recreation. 



FOREHAND ARMS GO., Worcester, Mass. 

Given as a Premium for 5 Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation 



A GOOD SAMARITAN. 

I was camping on Portage lake, and one 
afternoon was fishing about a quarter of a 
mile out, in front of the carry. Having lit- 
tle success, I finally turned around, when 
I saw, on the surface of the water, a few 
rods away, what I took to be a muskrat. 
Thinking of having a little sport, I picked 
up my paddle to give chase when I dis- 
covered that my rat was a fox-squirrel. 

I soon got alongside of him. He was 
pretty tired and was puffing like a little 
engine. With some assistance from the 
paddle he was soon on board, and I con- 
tinued to paddle toward shore. He took 
the stern of the boat, and as we neared 
shore he began to crawl along the edge of 
the boat; I could easily have touched him. 
As the boat was about to touch the bank, 
the little fellow jumped ashore. 

The lake here is fully % of a mile across, 
but from the direction he was swimming 
when I saw him he had probably swam 
much farther. 

I have seen 2 other fox squirrels swim- 
ming across lakes, in this way, but this is 
the first one I have ever been able to assist. 
C. W. Hill, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Your action in taking the little fellow 
aboard and then allowing him to continue 
on his journey is highly commendable. 
The average man, or boy, would have mur- 
dered him. — Editor. 



I would like you to state, in your next 
issue, which is the best revolver to be car- 
ried on hunting trips. We are going to 
North Canada, and then to South America. 
Our idea is a 44 — with blued barrels. 

The rifles we are taking are Winchesters 
32-40 and 50-100. If you can recommend 
anything superior to these, shall be glad to 
get your views; as you are a thorough 
judge. 

F. H. Best, Milwaukee, Wis. 

If you take any revolver try a 32 Marlin. 
It is just as good as the one you mention, 
and much lighter, yet will do any work 
you are likely ever to have for a revolver. 
Besides, the people who make it have sense 
enough to advertise in Recreation, which 
is more than can be said of the other con- 
cern — Editor. 



I send you herewith P. O. order for $1, 
for which please send the " best on earth " 
to J. B. Monroe, Kipp, Mont. If any 
readers of Recreation require a guide 
none better can be found in the state than 
Jack Monroe. He is courteous, and a gen- 
tleman; understands the habits of all the 
game found in this part of the country, and 
is the best hunter and killer of mountain 
lions I know of. 

H. H. Garr, Columbia Falls, Mont. 



RECREA TION. 



xlvii 



"THE LITTLE FINGER DOES IT" 

The Fisherman's Automatic Reel 



SEND FOR 
CATALOG 




Every Sportsman 
Should Have One 



Mention Recreation. 



What we claim for 
the Automatic Reel 



FIRST — It will wind up the 
line a hundred times as 
fast as any other reel in 
the world. 

SECOND— It will wind up 
the line slowly if the 
•angler chooses. 

THIRD — No fish can ever 
get slack line with it. 

FOURTH — It will save 
more fish than any other 
reel. 

FIFTH — It will prevent 
tips, lines, and snells 
from being broken by 
large fish. 

SIXTH — The reel is ma- 
nipulated entirely by the 
hand that holds the rod. 

SEVENTH— It enables the 
angler and makes it de- 
sirable to use lighter tips. 



xlviii RECREATION. 



Cruisings in the Cascades 



A NARRATIVE OF 



TRAVEL, EXPLORATION, AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY, 

HUNTING, AND FISHING 

WITH SPECIAL CHAPTERS ON HUNTING THE 

Grizzly Bear, the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and Deer ; also on 

Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; on a Cattle Roundup ; 

Life Among the Cowboys, Etc. 

By G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

AUTHOR OF "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," "HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE 

BIG HOLE," ETC. 

J2mo. 300 Pages. 75 Illustrations. Cloth, $2.00 ; Half Calf, $3.00. 

The learned writer, scientist, and sportsman, Col. W. D. Pickett, better known as 
" P.," says of this book : "The true lover of nature who delights to occasionally escape 
from the annoyances and worriments inseparable from so-called civilized life, and to 
wander amid scenes that tell only of the infinite power, the beneficence, and the grandeur 
of the Great Ruler; who delights to worship in the grandest of all His temples — the 
mountains ; who realizes and feels His presence on every mountain peak, in every dark 
canyon, in every rushing wind, in every gentle zephyr, and who, amid such scenes, 
above all realizes his own weakness and littleness ; he it is who will take pleasure in 
following the author amid some of the grandest and most beautiful scenery on this con- 
tinent. If, added to this, the reader should be imbued with some of the tastes and sym- 
pathies of the sportsman, additional zest will be given in the pleasant, graphic, and truthful 
descriptions of fishing and hunting incidents. The young sportsman who is desirous of 
hunting large game, will find here many indispensable hints as to their habits and the 
best methods of pursuing them. This book will meet with uni versal favor." 

Mr. T. S. Van Dyke, author of ** The Still Hunter," and other popular books, says : 
"It is one of the most entertaining books on field sports yet published. Mr. Shields 
always has something to say, and sa^s it in a way that makes one see it. He is never 
dull, and there is an air of truth about his work that fully satisfies the reader." 

Mr. Orin Belknap, known and loved of all sportsmen by his familiar pseudonym 
"Uncle Fuller," says : "The author of this work has placed the sportsmen of America 
under lasting obligations by his pleasing descriptions of his adventures in the wilds of 
these little-known mountains. Any writer who calls the attention of American sportsmen 
to the wonderful opportunities for legitimate sport — worth a trip across the continent, or 
a life-time of the tame enjoyment of Eastern sportsmanship — hidden away in the mysteri- 
ous gorges of the Cascade range, deserves the thanks of each and all who ever shouldered 
gun or rod. May this book prompt others of America's adventurous lovers of the wilder- 
ness to more thorough search for the hidden wonders of these mighty hills." 

" Boone," the writer of so many charming reminiscences of days among the hills, 
says of this book: "To the reader, whose calling in life, or whose personal limitations 
shut him off from the privileges enjoyed by Mr. Shields, there is given in these pages 
descriptions of scenery so vivid as to enable him to realize the grandeur in nature of the 
land that gives us birth. There are given him descriptions and traits of animals, in their 
wild state and in their native haunts, that he may never see save in collections. Let me 
commend it to all into whose hands this book may come — and they ought to be many — to 
give it a careful, not a- cursory reading. On second, and attentive reading, I was really 
struck by the accuracy of the author's descriptions of the bison, elk, antelope, grizzly bear, 
and mountain goat ; and the delineations from his camera make the whole work graphic 
indeed." 

** Sillalicum," another well-known and popular contributor to the sportsmen's journals, 
has this to say : " Mr. Shields eviden^y saw everything that could interest the sports- 
man, farmer, lumberman, or tourist ; and has described the country and its objects of 
interest in an effective and truthful way, with the eloquence of the artist, and the enthusiasm 
of the sportsman. No book ever published on Western sports is so delightfully written. 
A perusal of its pages places the reader among the scenes described, and he imagines 
himself looking at the rushing schools of salmon ; he hears the murmuring of the moun- 
tain stream ; the whispering of the alpine zephyr ; and can almost catch the gleam of the 
mountain lake as it washes the foot of the cragged peak on which roams the white goat." 



RECREATION. xlix 



Says W. B. Leffingwell, the gifted author of " Wild Fowl Shooting," and of " Shooting 
on Upland, Field, and Marsh ": " I have rarely encountered, anywhere, such vivid descrip- 
tions of life in the mountains, as are found in ' Cruisings in the Cascades.' My blood 
tingles as I follow the author, through these pages, in his encounters with the noble game 
he found in the great hills; and I long to lay aside the cares of business and seek those 
mighty fastnesses wherein he had such grand sport." 

44 Men who enjoy jaunts into the woods, in search of big game, will find this book ex- 
tremely interesting." — New York Herald. 

444 Cruisings in the Cascades' is by far the best thing Coquina has ever written." 

— American Field. 

" It is a handsomely printed and finely illustrated volume, made up of spirited sketches 
of travels, explorations, hunting, and fishing. It is charmingly interesting. The author 
mingles solid facts of great value with accounts of his wild adventures, and tells the story 
in an offhand style that banishes sleep from tired eyes." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

44 Mr. Shields handles a much diversified group of subjects with a master hand, and 
adheres throughout to a singularly pleasant and original way of expressing himself. His 
chapter on 4 Trouting in the Rocky Mountains' is as delicious a bit of word-painting as 
we have ever met with," — Sports Afield. 

44 'Cruising in the Cascades' is Mr. Shields* latest, and, we think, best publication. 
It will be heartily appreciated by American sportsmen. One of the most important chap- 
ters in the book is that on the Rocky Mountain goat. Heretofore little has been written 
on that animal, and Mr. Shields has treated the subject in a thorough and careful manner. 
He has recorded much valuable matter, with regard to this animal, which can be referred 
to by naturalists and sportsmen with profit. Many of the illustrations in the book are from 
photographs taken by the author, and are unusually good." — Shooting and Fishing. 

* 4 Coquina is widely and favorably known as an entertaining, practical writer on out- 
door sports, and * Cruisings in the Cascades' will add to a well-earned fame in his special 
field. His pen-pictures of wild life and wild sports, in the Far West, are accompanied by 
many excellent illustrations of fish and game, and of the scenes and places visited, adding 
greatly to the attractive character of the work." — The Independent. 

" The pages are breezy and the illustrations numerous and attractive, the camera 
having been freely used by the author in his travels." — The Bookbuyer. 

44 Mr. Shields touches on numerous subjects. Nothing seems to escape his keen eye, 
and whatever he describes becomes vivid to the mind of the reader, full of interest and 
clearfy defined. His pen-pictures of hunting adventures, boating, and the sports of the 
ranch, tingle with the warm glow of quickened pulse-beats and rapidly coursing blood." 

— Book Chat. 

44 The author's style of writing would make even a dull subject enjoyable, but with 
such a theme — his own extended and rich experience- — we have a book whose wide circula- 
tion seems assured. There are enchanting sketches of scenery, pleasing stories of moun- 
tain climbing, of hunting and fishing ; excellent estimates and delineations of Indian 
character, drawn from personal contact ; a fine description of salmon and their habits, and 
such accounts of bear, elk, deer, and goat hunting as to make the blood of the hunter 
tingle in every vein." — Public Opinion. 

44 Mr. Shields is not only a hunter, but an angler, and an amateur photographer, and 
on his excursions in the mountains has made good use of his opportunities. As a narra- 
tive of adventure the book is entertaining, and as a record of sport it will delight many 
readers." — The Literary World. 

" It is sure to meet with a large sale." — Chicago Tribune. 

*' It is by all odds the most fascinating book on big game hunting ever published." 

— The "Journalist. 

" The illustrations are, for the most part, made from photographs, and are one of the 
chief charms of the book. Those who have read 4 Rustlings in the Rockies,' by the same 
author, are familiar with the charm of his style." — Photographic Times. 

44 It is beautifully printed and profusely illustrated, detailing a great variety of ad- 
venture in travel, exploration, hunting, and fishing. Mr. Shields is an enthusiastic lover 
of nature, in all her wilder forms, with an eye quick to see the beauty and grandeur of 
river and plain, and forest and mountain, and a ready pen to describe them. He is a keen 
and tireless sportsman, a quick and accurate judge of men, with that curious quality of 
humor that enables a man to see and enjoy the oddities, even in perilous passages, all 
grounded on the restless spirit of the born rover. To the great majority of men, for 
whom wild adventure possesses an irresistible fascination, this book is full of the most 
absorbing interest." — Chicago Times. 

Mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the Author, 

G. O. SHIELDS, J9 West 24th Street, New York, 
Or given as a Premium for 5 Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREATION. 



ti>c musfcoka and midland 
Cakes Resorts 

Reached only by the 

Grand Trunk Railway System 

Is the Paradise for not only hunters, fishermen, and canoe- 
ists, but also those in search of health, where comfort 
and pleasure can be obtained economically. 

The woodland and lake scenery would satisfy thfe most 
critical tourist. 

Camping outfits can be purchased cheaply, or guides, 
thoroughly acquainted with this region, fully equipped 
for camping, can be secured readily. 

Parties can be furnished with names of guides, and by 
communicating with them, make all necessary arrange- 
ments in advance. 

The following fish and game, in season, are to be 
found in abundance, the variety of which is not surpassed 
by any other sporting region in the world : 

Fish.— Bass, pickerel, brook trout, lake trout, white- 
fish, perch, sunflsh, salmon, trout, sturgeon, catfish, 
herring, and muskalonge. 

Game.— Deer, partridge, rabbits, pigeons, ducks.geese, 
plover, bear, woodcock, snipe, grouse, and moose. 

A few of the other Principal Resorts.— Andros- 
coggin Lakes, the White Mountains, the salmon re- 
sorts of Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, 
Lake St. John region, the River St. Lawrence, the 
Thousand Islands. 



...Co "the" Pleasure Room »»... 

Cexas ana Gulf of Mexico 



TAKE 



For descriptive book showing routes and rates, apply 
to M. 0.- Dickson, D.P.A., Toronto, Ont.; D. O. Pease, 
D.P.A., Montreal, P.Q.; L. R. Morrow, C.P.A., Chicago, 
111.; R. McC. Smith, S.P„A., Cincinnati, O. 



Chas. M. Hats, Geo B. Reeve, W. E. Davis, 

General Manager, Gen. Traffic Manager, G. P. & T. A., 

Montreal, P. Q. Montreal, P. Q. Montreal, P. Q. 

Frank P. Dwyer, E. P. Agent, 273 Broadway, New York. 



2,000 
Miles 




Via CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, or 
ST. LOUIS 

WAGNER BUFFET SLEEPERS 

FREE "KATY" CHAIR CARS 

For further information, address 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, Gen. East. Agt. 
309 Broadway, New York 






m 






^OFjt 




$& varied scenery ; mountains, hills, 
yjv» : valleys, rivers, lakes, parks, can- 
:«: vons — found between St. Paul and 






m 

'is 



Portland, Oregon. 

All the best cities of the north- 
west reached via this line. 

Pullman sleeping cars, both first- 
class and tourist, and through din- 
ing-cars, on all overland trains. 

FINEST HUNTING AND 
FISHING RESORTS 



3® 



Send six cents for our new book 
WONDERLA ND '97 



m. 






UNEQUALED 
ATTRACTIONS 



ON THE LINE OF THE 



Union pacific 



FOR TOURISTS 

It traverses the Grandest Scenery »f 
the Rocky Mountains, and reaches all 
the Health and Pleasure Resorts of 
the Mid-Continent. 



«-c£**> 



Sportsmen 



will find in scores of local- 
ities along this line game 
worthy of their skill, such as 
Bear, Mountain Lion, Coyotes, Elk, Deer, Ante- 
lope, Mountain Sheep, Feathered Game of all 
kinds. And everywhere are Beautiful Streams 
well stocked with Trout. 



CHAS. 5. FEB 
General Pass. Agt. St. Paul, Minn, 



MKwroflfllHMHHnHi 



For Gun Club Rules, Game Laws, and any in- 
formation relative to localities for Hunting, or for 
information in regard to the UNION PACIFIC 
SYSTEM, call on or address any General or 
Traveling Agent of this Company. 

S. TENBROECK, Gen'l Eastern Agent, 

287 Broadway, New York City 

E. L. LOMAX, 
Gen'l Pass. * Tkt, Ajt. 
Omaha, Neb. 



XM tt DICKINSON, 



R EC RE A TION. 



li 



DOGS AND BIRDS 



A FEW COPIES REMAiN OF 
OUR CALENDAR FOR 1898, 
ILLUSTRATED WITH PICT- 
URES OF WELL-KNOWN 
TYPICAL DOCS AND BIRDS 
AND CONTAINING MUCH USE- 
FUL INFORMATION FOR THE 
AMATEUR. COPIES MAILED 
ON RECEIPT OF STAMPS OR 
CURRENCY AT THE RATE OF 
8EVEN CENTS PER COPY. 



Spratts Patent Limited 

239-245 E. 56th St., N. Y. 



Hens Make Money 

under proper conditions. Those condi- 
tions are defined in our MAMMOTH 
NEW POULTRY BOOK and CATA- 

LOC for 1898. Bigrger & better than 

ever before. Printed in colors; cuts and 

description of all leading breeds of fowls; 

poultry house plans, tested remedies, 

prices on poultry, eggs, etc. Worth $5, but 

sent postpaid for 1 5 cents in stamps or coin. 

The J~. XV. Miller Co. 

Box 47, Freeport, III. 




I am in receipt of the Syracuse hammerless shot-gun you 
sent me, for the subscriptions to Recreation. It is a 
handsome gun and I am more than pleased with the result 
of my work. F. E. Parsons, Danbury, Conn. 



The Yawman & Erbe automatic reel is an excellent 
thing, and hereafter I shall not be without one. I fully 
recognize and appreciate your generosity in giving premi- 
ums. R. Frank Schaffner, Harrisburg, Pa. 



I received the Forehand gun, and it is a beauty. It is 
just as I expected. All the subscribers are well pleased 
with the gun, I got, as also with the magazine. 

Ben. T. Foulke, Scranton, Pa. 



I received the Cyclone camera, which you sent for 7 sub- 
scriptions, and am very much pleased with it, it being a 
much better camera than I expected. 

W. B. Allen, Jackson, Mich. 



The Bristol steel rod you sent me, as a premium for 10 
subscriptions to Recreation, has proved satisfactory in 
every particular. O. W. Scudder, Piqua, Ohio. 



Everybody who sees Recreation likes it. How can 
he help it? H. G. Higbee, Hyde Park, Mass. 



ALWAYS MENTION RECREA- 
TION WHEN ANSWERING ADS. 



20 BOOKS - - 

ON 20 DIFFERENT SUBJECTS, 
BUT ALL RELATING TO SOME 
DELIGHTFUL PHASE OF 
AMERICAN TRAVEL, VIA 
"AMERICA'S GREATEST RAIL- 
ROAD." 

******** 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE SENT 
FREE, POST-PAID, ON RECEIPT 
OF A 1-CENT STAMP BY GEORGE 
H. DANIELS, GENERAL PASSENGER 
AGENT, NEW YORK CENTRAL & 
HUDSON RIVER RAILROAD, GRAND 
CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK. 



The 30-30 Marlin you ordered for me, as a premium, 
came on the 17th inst. and is a daisy. Please accept my 
sincere thanks. C. L. Flower, Greeley, CoL 



The Davenport rifle I got for 10 subscribers is a little 
peach. I have had 5 or 6 chances to sell it. 

Sam Roberts, Canaan, Conn. 



Recreation is wonderfully improved and should be sub 
scribed for by all lovers of outdoor sport. 

Mrs. A. T. Oakes, Savannah, Ga. 



I have been taking Recreation 2 years and think it the 
best publication of its kind in existence. 

J. M. Lassiter, Lasker, N. C. 



Everyone is satisfied with Recreation and I couldn't do 
without it. C. S. Glascoe, Pueblo, Col. 



Without a doubt Recreation is the best periodical of its 
kind ever published. B. Crouch, Troy, N. Y. 



I wish you success in your publication. It is the best of 
its kind I ever read. Dr. R. B. Cabell, Miami, Mo. 



I take several sportsmen's journals but Recreation is 
the best of all. E. B. Ellis, Winchendon, Mass. 



I would as lief go without my dinner as without Recrea- 
tion. F. J. McMorrow, Boston, Mass. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's journal I have seen. 
S. R. Cates, M.D., Abilene, Texas. 



I am highly pleased with Recreation. It is the best of 
its kind. A. A. Wright, Austin, Minn. 



For Sale: A 22 calibre repeating rifle, 15 
shot. Been shot but a few times. Is as 
good as new. Will sell for $9 cash, or trade 
for bicycle. Address, 

J. A. Brown, Osage, Iowa. 



RECREA TION. 



ii 



Why, Sir! 




* H 



I'll back that Bristol Steel Fishing Rod of mine 
against any rod in the world, at any price, to throw a 
line further, hook a fish quicker, and stand a hard fight 
better. I know what I am talking about, for I've been 
there, and my ' Bristol ' has been with me, every time. 
It only weighs 6^ oz. and cost me the paltry sum of 
$650- If you'd like to know all about the seventeen 
different sizes and styles The Horton Manufacturing 
Coo make, drop them a card and ask for Catalogue 'R.' 
Their address is at Bristol, Conn." 



Mention Recreation. 



I promised to tell you exactly what I 
thought of the Syracuse hammerless gun 
you sent me, lest fall, for 40 subscriptions 
to Recreation, after having given it a 
thorough trial. I spent 2 weeks in Minne- 
sota, during October, and as the chickens 
and ducks were wild, had an excellent op- 
portunity to test the killing qualities of this 
gun. 

I could not see but that I killed as often 
and as far, with my 12 gauge Syracuse, as 
those of our party who were shooting 
more expensive 8 and 10 gauge guns, and 
which required, or at least used, nearly 
double the ammunition. In any event I 
am satisfied I will never own a better gun, 
for the money, than the Syracuse. I can 
heartily recommend it to all who want a 
moderate priced yet good, close, hard 
shooting gun. 

Harry A. Beaver, Cadillac, Mich. 

I received from the Ithaca Gun Co., 
Ithaca, N. Y., the double-barrelled ham- 
merless breech-loading shot gun, as a 
premium for a club of subscriptions to 
Recreation, and it is a beauty. It is 
strong, handsome, and shoots splendidly. 
In fact it is a much finer gun than I ex- 
pected. I am well pleased; and will speak 
a good word for the tthaca to my friends. 
My subscribers are all well pleased with 

Recreation; and all anxious to get the 



next copies. Recreation is the best 
sportsman's journal on earth. 

Ed S. Case, Pattonsburg, Mo. 



The Kenwood sleeping bag came duly 
to hand and I am both surprised and de- 
lighted. It far exceeds my expectations. 
How you can give such an elegant prize, 
for so few subscriptions, I am at a loss to 
understand. You have dealt honorably 
with me indeed, and I thank you sincerely. 
E. K. Lent, Otsego, Mich. 



I take several sportsmen's magazines, 
but Recreation leads them all, and I look 
forward to its arrival each month with 
great pleasure. 

While on our annual hunt, in October, 
Mr. Murray noticed something about deer 
that we had never seen before, nor can we 
find any one else who has. He wished to 
ask Recreation about it: While return- 
ing from an unsuccessful hunt, for elk, he 
came to an open place in the timber, about 
400 yards in diameter, and there, lying in 
the sage-brush, was a bunch of about 20 
fawns, and no large deer anywhere in sight. 
Neither could he find any traces of any, in 
the timber, though lie had been through it 
carefully, all around the open place. Have 
you ever seen so many young deer in a 
bunch, without any old ones? 
W. II. Shearman, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



RECREA TION. 



in 



For nearly 50 Years the name 



has been identified with 
the manufacture of 




I AUTOMATIC EJECTOR 

Our present line is complete and varied and shows the result of years of experience 

For catalogues and information address 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO. 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 



Mention Recreation 

Ejector Guns 
no longer a 
luxury 




TUNS OF THOUSANDS IN USB 

Send for Catalogue 

LEFEVER ARMS CO. 

Mention Recreation 



Good news for Sportsmen 

Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 
within the reach of every sportsman 

OUR NEW EJECTOR MOVEMENT 

Has only two pieces : One in the 
Hammer, One in 
the Frame 

We have decided to meet 
the demand for medium 
price Ejectors, and are now 
prepared to accept orders 
for all grades of our ham- 
merless guns fitted with 
Ejectors. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



Date, ..... 1897 

Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 19 West 24th St., New York: 

Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me RECREATION 

for one year beginning with \ number. 

Name, 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN. 



liv 



RECREA TION. 



New Ithaca ^ Guns 



i 



Self compensating, 
taking up wear 
at every point 




¥ 
V 
¥ 

Bored * 

FOR BLACK DAN » 
NITRO POWDERS 

Close and Hard Shooting Guns 
at long range a specialty 




Price but a little more than one-naif that of any other good gun, and 
warranted in the most positive terms, shooting included 



ITHACA GUN COMPANY, ITHACA, N. Y. 



Manufacturers of fine Hammer 
and Hammerless Guns 










FOR FIELD OR FOR TRAP, 
FOR POT HUNTING OR FUN, 
NO SPORTSMAN IS EQUIPPED 
WITHOUT A SYRACUSE GUN 



" MORE TRUTH 
THAN POETRY" 




We do oot say that SYRACUSE HAMMERLESS GUNS 

"Are as Good " as any gun in the market. 




Their simplicity of construction and superiority of finish stamp them "BETTER" for 
practical all-round "work than any gun in the market. The "old, old story" but, 
nevertheless, substantiated by every man who ever drew a Syracuse to his shoulder. 




SYRACUSE ARMS CO,, SYRACUSE, N. Y„ U. S. A. 




Sol* Ageoti. HERMANN BOKER & CO., 101 Duane Street, New York City 



RECREA TIUN. 



lv 



Forehand Arms Co/s 

EJECTOR AND NON-EJECTOR 

HAMMERLESS DOUBLE GUN 




LATEST MODEL 



Read what men 
say of the 

Forehand 

who are using it 



Hadensville, Todd Co., Ky. 
Forehand Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Dear Sirs : — Please send me one of your catalogues. 
I bought one of your No. I, full choke, hammerless, 
non-ejector guns last fall, and have killed a good 
many ducks, squirrels, some rabbits and quails with 
it. I consider it the best gun I ever owned, although 
I once owned a Rigby that cost $300. 

R. C. Hollins. 



Am well satisfied with the Forehand gun you sent 
me. Have done some remarkable shooting with it on 
wild geese and ruffed grouse. My gun not only looks 
well but is a hard shooter. All the subscribers are 
highly pleased with Recreation, and several have 
told me they will renew next year. 
A. T. Baker, 

67 Frank St., Lowell, Mass. 



We get 
Thousands 
of such 
Testimonials — 
all Unsolicited 



We challenge competition in Beauty, Workmanship, Simplic- 
ity of Mechanism, Shooting Qualities and Price. We target 
all our guns with nitro powder. For Catalogue, address 

FOREHAND ARMS CO., WORCESTER, MASS. 



lvi 



RECREA TION. 



FLORIDA, AUGUSTA, Al KEN—THE SOUTH. 

The Southern Railway announces the 
most perfect dining and sleeping car ser- 
vice for all Southern cities and winter re- 
sorts for the season of 1897-98. The two 
Limited trains — the Washington and 
Southern Limited and United States Fast 
Mail — are operated daily, every day in the 
year, giving the most superb service. New 
York to New Orleans, Aiken, Augusta, 
Asheville ("the Land of the Sky"), Savan- 
nah, Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Tampa, 
Atlanta, Memphis, Chattanooga, and, in 
fact, any point South or Southwest. Ef- 
fective January 17th, the " Florida Lim- 
ited " will be resumed — a most magnifi- 
cently equipped train built especially by the 
Pullman Company for this service, and will 
be operated solid between New York and 
St. Augustine, composed exclusively of 
dining, library, observation, drawing- 
room, and compartment sleeping cars. 
Also attached to this train will be most 
perfect service New York to Aiken and 
Augusta; also Brunswick, Ga., and Jekyl 
Island. For full particulars, call on or ad- 
dress Alex. S. Thweatt, Eastern passenger 
agent, 271 Broadway, New York. 



Spratts Patent, 239 E. 56th St., New 
York, has issued its annual calendar, for 
'98. To people who know this house, no 
further announcement than this will be 
necessary. All such would feel satisfied, 
without being told, that this is a beautiful 
and valuable piece of work. The calendar 
contains a lot of information for dog fan- 
ciers, poultry fanciers, pigeon fanciers, 
and others. Much of this is in the form 
of questions and answers, which have been 
evolved from the extensive correspondence 
of Spratts, and covers about every prob- 
lem that could arise in the handling of 
dogs, fowls, or pets of any kind. 

Spratts have already begun the prepara- 
tion of their '99 calendar, and they request 
owners of fine dogs to send in photographs 
of same, for reproduction in the next year's 
calendar. 



Leadville, Col. 
Editor Recreation: You may be inter- 
ested in knowing what your magazine has 
done for itself and your advertisers. Two 
months ago, the paper was unknown 
among the 700 men employed here. Now 
they all know it, and many buy it; while 
others find it in the reading rooms. The 
effect on them all seems the same. After 
reading the book, they become so enthused 
on the subject of shooting they turn to 
the advertisements and fall into discussions 
of the guns and ammunition described 
therein. The result has been the sale of 
many guns; and I am glad to say they are 
all of the makes advertised in Recreation. 



Colt's guns were favorites, but they are 
out of it; because we don't read of them 
in Recreation, and that is the only sports- 
men's journal taken in this city. People 
buy what they hear most about, and they 
certainly become interested in guns from 
reading Recreation. It seems to me this 
makes it a wonderful advertising medium, 
throughout the West. 

R. J. Rowen. 



The Winchester repeating shotgun you 
gave me, for a club of subscriptions to 
Recreation, came duly and I have tested 
it thoroughly, both at the traps and at live 
game. Am now prepared to say there is 
not a better, closer shooting, harder hitting 
gun made. 

After having used a double barrelled gun, 
one of these is somewhat awkward at first; 
but after this has been overcome the re- 
peater is a joy forever. Many a time the 
third barrel is the one we need most, in our 
business. 

Once more I wish to express my unqual- 
ified approval of the way in which you 
score the game and fish hogs. 

Your magazine is certainly an eye opener 
to some men of that class, who have been 
merely thoughtless in their actions. Any 
such benighted mortals who hereafter at- 
tract my attention, and who are short on 
dollars, will get Recreation just the same. 
If they read they will get a liberal educa- 
tion on the preservation of game and fish. 

I notice in December Recreation the 
names of many sportsmen, with whom I 
am more or less acquainted, who are in 
favor of the L. A. S. Put me down in the 
list, with a vote for Recreation as the of- 
ficial organ. 

H. C. Gardiner, Builder's Exchange, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



IN A SNOW STORM. 

On December 2d Mr. Frank Parmelee, 
of Omaha, for the third time proved his 
supremacy over Jim Elliott, of Kansas 
City, with a score of 97 to 91 birds. Mr. 
Elliott lost 5 birds out of bounds and had 
general hard luck. In spite of bad weather 
Mr. Parmelee made a run of 43, and an un- 
finished run of 41. The winner used a 
Remington gun and U. M. C. ammunition. 



Wm. W. Hart & Co.'s business has 
outgrown their former quarters and they 
have moved to No. 47 East 12th Street, 
just West of Broadway, and adjoining the 
old St. George Hotel. 



Hon. W. J. Bryan has lately bought a 
Remington Hammcrless Gun, for a pro- 
posed shooting trip. 



RECREA TION. 



lvii 



8tmns Bicycle Rifle || 




Barrel JO, 12, 15 or 18 inches long. Weight, 2y 2 pounds. 
For .22, .25, and .32 rim-fire cartridges. 



i 



Catalog of Rifles, 
Pistols, and Bicycle 
Rifles on application. 

Rifles Rebored. 



jf* Stevens Hrms and "Cool Co* $ 

I 



P. O. Box 444 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. 



MR. FRED GILBERT 

In the Contest for the 

E. C. Cup 

Made the following score : 



HIE USED 



48 out of 50 

UNKNOWN ANGLES 

48 out of 50 

EXPERT RULES 

46 out of 50 

DOUBLES 



DuPont 

Smokeless 

Powder 



4 



E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS * CO 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 



lviii 



RECREATION. 




What's 
the Use 

of walking when you 
can get a first-class, high- 
grade bicycle for nothing? 

How? 

By getting 75 subscriptions for 

Recreation 

If you live in a town of 3,000 
or more, and if you are a hustler 
you can get these in 2 days* 

I can give you the names of 20 
people who did this in \ 896, and 
who now have their wheels* 

"Write for particulars. 

RECREATION 

19 West 24th Street 
New York 




The Gramophone you gave me, for 25 
subscribers, came to-day and I am de- 
lighted with it. It is the best instrument 
of the kind I ever saw. I appreciate your 
kindness in hurrying it along. When I 
started out to get the club I had no idea I 
could get so many, but just thought I 
would, see what I could do; and to my 
great surprise in less than a week I had 
the 25. Will try, when away from here, to 
get others interested in getting up clubs. 
Again let me thank you for the Gramo- 
phone. 

H. M. Johnson, Batavia, N. Y. 



We have named our summer cottage, on 
Triangular lake, Recreation Lodge, and 
will soon send you a photograph of it. 

John Coolbaugh, 30 Horton Street, 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

I appreciate the honor you confer on the 
magazine, by naming your cottage for it, 
and have sent a flag bearing the name of 
your summer home. — Editor. 



To Exchange: A fine 40-70-330 Ballard 
rifle, with complete set <>f reloading tools, 
for hand camera. 

E. F. Pope, Colmesneil, Texas. 



BOOKS 



By 



C. O. SHIELDS 

(coquina) 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts and Characteristics. 
How, When and Where to Hunt it. 8vo, 6oo 
pages, 80 illustrations. Cloth, $350 ; Half Mor- 
occo, $5.00 ; Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur 
Photography, Hunting and Fishing, with Special 
Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, the Buf- 
falo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 
Deer ; also on Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; 
on a Montana Roundup ; Life Among the Cow- 
boys, etc. iamo, 300 pages, 75 illustrations. Cloth, 
$2 ; Half Morocco, $3. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES 

How, When and Where to Angle for them. 8vo, 
400 pages, 50 illustrations. Cloth, $2.50; Half Mor- 
occo, $4. 

HUNTINO IN THE GREAT WEST 

(Rustlings in the Rockies) 
Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and 
Stream, nmo, cloth. Over 300 pages. Illustrated. 
Price, 75 cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics. 
Utility, Breeding, Training, Diseases and Kennel 
Management of all Breeds of Dogs. 8vo, 650 pages, 
100 illustrations. Cloth, $3.50; Half Morocco, $5; 
Full Morocco, $6.5*. 

CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sports- 
men. i2mo, 2ft p^ges, 30 illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 

THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with 
the Nez Perce Indians in the Big Hole Basin, Mon- 
tana, August 9. 1877. nmo, 150 pages. Profusely 
illustrated. Cloth, $1. 
These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt 

Of price, by the author. 

Q. O. SHIELDS 

Iff W«»t 24th St., New Y«f* 



RECREA TION. 



lix 



Some Rare * 
Opportunities 

These goods are all new, and will be 
shipped direct from factory. Prices 
named are those at which manufact- 
urers and dealers usually sell. Here is 
a good chance to get 

A BOOK 

A GUN \ 

A CAMERA / 

a sleeping bag ( Tree Of 

A FISHING ROD ( gO$t 

A REEL \ 

A TENT J 
A BICYCLE 

Subscriptions need not all be sent at 
once. They can be sent in instalments as 
taken and credit will be given on account. 
When the required number is obtained 
the premium earned will be shipped. 

" Recreation " %**%**"* 



K 



To any person sending me 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation at 
$i each, I will send a copy of Hunting in 
the Great West, paper ; or a Czar Camera, 
listed at $i ; or an Ingersoll Watch or 
Cyclometer, each listed at $i. 

THREE subscriptions at $r each, a copy of 
The Battle of the Big Hole, cloth. 

FOUR subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Camping and Camping Outfits, cloth. 

FIVE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Cruising in the Cascades, cloth. 

SIX subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
American Game Fishes, cloth ; or a Baby 
Hawkeye Camera, listed at $6. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
The Big Game of North America, or of 
The American Book of the Dog, cloth ; or a 
Cyclone Camera, listed at $6 ; or an Aus- 
tralian Mosquito-proof Tent, listed at $7. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a Pocket 
Kodak, made by the Eastman Kodak Co., 
and listed at $5 ; or a Water-proof Wall 
Tent, 7^x7^, and listed at $7.50. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a single-shot 
Davenport Rifle ; or a Fishing rod, or a 
Yawman and Erbe Automatic Reel, listed 
at $9 ; or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, listed 
at Sio. 



TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each a Man- 
hattan Improved Hand Camera, made by 
the Manhattan Optical Co., and listed at 
$12 ; or an Australian Mosquito-proof 
Tent, listed at $12.50; or a Stevens Dia- 
mond Pistol, listed at $5 to $6. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Davenport Single-barrel, breech-loading 
Ejector Shotgun, listed at $10; or a 
Camera, listed at $6 to $10; or a Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag, complete with canvas cover, 
listed at $16 ; or a Kozy Camera, listed at 
$10 ; or a No. 2 Bullet Camera, listed at 
$10 ; or a Stevens Diamond Pistol, listed 
at $7.50 to $8.50; or a No. 17 Stevens 
Favorite Rifle, listed at $6. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, with 
Elgin Movement, listed at $20; or a Marlin 
Repeating Rifle, listed at $14 or less ; or 
a No. 4 Bullseye Camera, made by the 
Eastman Kodak Co., and listed at $12 ; 
or a No. 18 Stevens Favorite Rifle, with 
open sights, listed at $8.50 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. 4 Bullet Camera, made by the East- 
man Kodak Co., and listed at $15 ; or 
a Gramophone, listed at $25 ; or an Aus- 
tralian Mosquito-proof Tent, listed at $25 ; 
or a Marlin Repeating Rifle, listed at $18 
or less ; or a Shattuck Double-barrel 
Breech-loading Shot-gun, listed at $25 ; 
or a No. 19 Stevens Favorite Rifle, 
listed at $9.00 ; or a Water-proof Tent, 
gfxgf.made by Derby, Abercrombie & Co.; 
or Kozy Camera. 

THIRTY subscriptions at $1 each, a New 
Haven Arms Co.'s Double-barrel Breech- 
loading Shot-gun, listed at $30 ; or a 
Marlin Repeating Rifle, listed at $21 
or less ; or any Stevens Rifle or Pistol, 
listed at $20 or less. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions, at $1 each, 
an Arlington Sewing-Machine, worth 
$i9-5o. 

FORTYsubscriptionsat$i each, a Syracuse, 
Grade 0,oran Ithaca, quality, No. 1 plain, 
Double-barrel Hammerless Breech-load- 
ing Shot-gun, worth $35 ; or a Camera, 
worth $25 ; or a Marlin Repeating Rifle, 
listed at $24 or less ; or any Stevens 
Rifle or Pistol, listed at $28 or less. 



FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Marlin 
Rifle, with fancy curled walnut stock, 
pistol grip, checkered fore-end, hand- 
somely engraved, half octagon, half 
magazine, with take down, listed at $50. 

SEVENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Safety Bicycle, listed at $75 to $100. 

ONE HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, 
a fine Lefever Hammerless Gun. listed 
at $85. 



lx 



RECREA TION. 



^^^-^>^^g>^^^>.^^^ <g^fc (g^cQfc**^* 





Proper Food 

and 

Exercise 

are essential to those 
who would possess 
both mental and phys- 
" vigor. 




is an ideal food 
stimulating, nutritious, 

delightful to the taste 

and easily assimilated. n|H 

It is the whole nutriment of prime beef in condensed form 
and may be prepared in a moment with hot or cold water . 

f To be had of all druggists and grocers, f 

The interesting little pamphlet" VariOU5 Vie\V5 OnViOOTdP 5 mailed for the a5 N 




Armour & Company 

Chicago ^^, 



e> 



o<&°^&* 




t 
t 



4 Shots that are 
Heard Around the 
World" in 1898 



(O Ivl C O f\D B HI D Q.L 

^Aprils 19™ 1775. 



^ 



are made with 



U. M. C. 

Ammunition 

Its reliability has won 
universal recognition 



Send for complete catalogue of 

Cartridges and Loaded Shells 



The Union Metallic 
Cartridge Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

313 Broadway 425 Market Street 
New York San Francisco, Cal. 




t 
t 




Remington 

Shotguns 



Are Aimed to Meet 
the Requirements of 
All Shooters. 



Strong in Workmanship 
Perfect in Balance 
Reasonable in Price 



New Illustrated Catalogue 
Mailed Free 



Remington Arms Co. 

ILION, N. Y. 

313 Broadway, New York 
425 Market St. , San Francisco 





(trade mark) 

MOST SMALL CALIBER AMMUNITION 

SHOOTS WELL SOMETIMES. 

Winchester Gallery Ammunition; 

22 Short, .22 Long, .22 Long Rifle And .22 Winchester, 

SHOOTS WELL ALL THE TIME. 

USED BY THE BEST SHOTS ; SOLD EVERYWHERE. 

FREE— Send name and address on a postal card for 148-page 
Illustrated Catalogue. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., New Haven, Conn. 







The CLIPPER SPECIAL 

Which is meeting with so much favor 
among- the knowing- ones— the fastidi- 
ous riders — has been "dubbed" by 
them as an "1898 bicycle 14 months 
ahead of anything yet shown." Every 
bit of material, every ounce of steel, 
every minutes' work, every inch of 
finish, employed in the make-up of this 
expensive bicycle 

IS 24 CARATS FINE. 

There isn't a single good practical me- 
chanical feature which we could think 
of that was untried. Not a feature 
in this bicycle is an experiment. 
Every point is a good one, every change 
for a purpose. We get the right wheel 
base (44 in.), a narrow tread (4% in.), correct distance between ball races (3 in.), large 
sprockets (22 tooth), wide tire (2 in.), all without weakening the rear forks by bending. The 
Clipper Elliptical Hollow Truss Hanger does it. Special catalogue on application. 

Made by the OR AND RAPIDS CYCLE CO., Qrand Rapids, Mich. 

P. 268 N. 




u 



Trow Directory, Printing and Bookbinding Company. 



VOLUME VIII. 
NUMBER 3 



MARCH, 1898 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 



E 



o 
< 

§ 

J 
< 










This issue of Recreation 
office Receipts, and News 



is 65,000 Copies. Books, Printer's Bills, Post- 
Co.'s Orders shown to any one asking to see them. 





THE GAMORD MfG Co ELYRFA, OHIO. 



t 

t 



*$|0O$|50* 
IN ALL 

tstandard- 

AND MANY 
ORIGINAL 
STYLES. 



have built up on 
merit the largest 
plant in the world 
for manufactur- 
ing these goods. 
You can benefit 
by their success— 
wear the prod- 
uct. 



COLLARS 



>-" BRAND 
25CZS 



(don grand 

ARROW 
BJtA'ND 



PERFECT IN FIT/STYLE AND FINISH 

AM" 





YOUR DEALER 

>i Wllj 



FACTORIES: 

TROY, NX, 



Golf Clubs J 

t 

t 



Manufactured under 
the supervision of 

JOHN D. 

DUNN 

Formerly 
of Bourne- 
mouth, 
Eng., and 
later of 
Ardsley- 
on- 
Hudson. 

In Three Grades, $2 00, $1.50, $1.00 




John D. Dunn's Celebrated Single- 
piece Drivers and Brasseys 

Write for further particulars. 

THE BRIDGEPORT GUN IMPLEMENT CO 



i^%%v%%%v%%%%i%%%%%%%%%%%v5i 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
313 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1896, by G. O. Shields 

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 

$1.00 a Year. G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 19 West 24TH Street, 

10 Cents a Copy. Editor and Manager. New York. 

CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER Page 

A Running Bucker. Frontispiece Frederic Remington 

The Wolf that Got Away. Illustrated Lieut. E. L. Munson, U. S. A. 171 

' • The next instant, the hound went whirling down " Ernest Seton Thompson 172 

On Educating the Horse. Illustrated Dr. J. C Hennessy 174 

Some Deer, a Bear and a Moose. Illustrated W. H. Wright 178 

Hunting with a Camera, IV. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 182 

Northern Sharp-Tail Grouse. Illustrated John Boyd 184 

A Night's Bass Fishing F. L. Davis 185 

?uail in Winter A. Jessup 187 

he Bear Story our Visitor Told E. L. Kellogg 188 

Wild Turkeys in the Sunk Lands John W. Prather 189 

An Elk Hunt J. B. Jennett (Old Silver Tip) 190 

God's Language. Poem Edward G. Allanson 191 

The Alaska Peninsula L. L. Bales 192 

The Biped Swine. Poem S. B. M'Manus 193 

A Car-Load of Ducks J. B. A. 194 

He Got the Coon Adella Washer 195 

Our First Load of Meat E. P. Jaques 195 

The Associated Pirates, II E. V. Keyser 197 

In Mexico Ed. Williams 198 

A Coon and Some Yams Elliot C Brown 200 

Climbing Mountains on Wheels Lincoln M. Miller 200 

A Canoe Cruise In Northern Minnesota S. B. Buckmaster, M.D. 202 

International Items F. L. Oswald 203 

An Exciting Bear Hunt A. Plummer 205 



From the Game Fields 206 

Fish and Fishing 217 

Guns and Ammunition 226 

Natural History 230 

The League of American Sportsmen 233 

Editor's Corner 236 

Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, 1894 



Canoeing 238 

Bicycling 241 

Publisher's Department 242 

Book Notices 246 

Amateur Photography 248 



5 <? 



9 
C 

c 

9 
6 

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6 

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/^"^LUB Committees and individuals hav- 
^— ^ ing in view the purchase of prizes 
for Golfing are invited to inspect the many 
suitable pieces of Solid Silverware offered 
by this house. 

THE OPPORTUNITY TO SUBMIT SPECIAL DESIGNS IS SOLICITED. 
APPLY FOR ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET. 

Theodore B. Starr 

206 FIFTH AVENUE MADISON SQUARE NEW YORK 



9 
? 

c 

t 
t 



6 d 



11 



RECREA TION. 



'yachts 



Steam 
and Sail 





THE ONLY NAPHTHA LAUNCH, 
MARINE ENGINES, WATERTUBE BOILERS, TORPEDO BOATS 

STEEL AND WOOD VESSELS 

Send ioc. stamp for illustrated catalogue of Steam or Naphtha 

GAS ENGINE & POWER CO. » CHARLES L SEABURY & CO. 

{Consolidated) 

Morris Heights, Ne<w York City 50 Broadvvay New York 



RECREA TION. 



111 





THE 



Big-Game Killer 



Legf of an animal before and 
after being shot with an ex- 
panding bullet cartridge fired 
from a 303 Caliber . ♦ • 



Savage 
Repeating Rifle 




AFTER 



THE BULLET 



BEFORE 



Catalogue on Application. 

SAVAGE ARMS CO. = Utica, N. Y. 




\ 




CURTICE BROTHERS 

Blue Label Soups 




represent all that's 
good in soups, 
made in nineteen 
varieties from best 
buyable materials, 
carefully prepared 
in cleanly kitchens. 
If you cannot find 
these goods with 
your grocer we will 
send you, charges 
prepaid, upon re- 
ceipt of ten 2-cent 
stamps, a full-size 
pint can of any one 
of the following va- 
rieties : 

Beef. Bouillon, Consomme, Chicken Gumbo, 
Chicken, Clam Broth, Clam Chowder, Juli- 
enne, Mock Turtle, Mutton Broth, Mullaga- 
tawny, Ox-tail, Pea, Printanier, Tomato, 
Tapioca Crecy, Vegetable. 

Address Department " D " 

Curtice Brothers Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Write us for Booklet " From Tree to Table " 
descriptive of our full line Canned Goods, 
Preserves, Jellies, Jams, and Blue Label 
Ketchup, sending us name of your local grocer 




salt river 

VAUifcY>f 

Arizona^! ffe? 

vArtotts 

HEALTH RESORTS 
■"NJEV/ MEXICO 

ARE UNRIVALED FDR THE RELIEF 
OF- CHRONIC LUNG AND THREAT B)5- 
EASE.5.HERE ARE FOUND PURE DRY AIR, 
EQUABLE- TEMPERATURE AND GONSTANT SUNSHINE. 
THE ITEMS OF ALTITUDE. TEMPeRATURE. HUMIDITY. H0T5PRIHG5 
SANATORIUM. GOST OF LIVING. MEDICAL ATTENBANG£,SQCIAL 
ADVANTAGES. ETG,AReCONCI5feLY TREATED IN DESCRIPTIVE 

PAMPHLETS I5SDED BYTKE SANTA FE ROUTE 
PHY5ICIAN6 ARE RESPECTFULLY XSKED TO PLACE THIS 
LITERATURE IN THE HAND5 Of INVALIDS. 
ADDRESS W.J. BLACK. 

G.P.A, AT.65.R Ry, 

TOPE K A. KANSAS. 

or. C.A.H1GGIN5, 

A. G. P. A. .CHICAGO. 



IV 



RECREATION. 




FORvTHE 



. Where 
Vet and Cold 
Preva 




Chosen 



GMENT, 




Consider — if you can keep the wet out of your rifle it will not rust 
nor freeze. Only 



Marlin Repeaters 




^*> 



have Solid Tops, shedding water like a duck's back. Our Wl-page 
book (just out) tells all about them. Up-to-date information about 
powders, black and smokeless; proper sizes, quantities, how to load; 
hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, 
etc.; trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All calibres, 22 to 45; how to 
care for arms and 1,000 other things, including many trade secrets 
never before given to the public. Free if you will send stamps for 
postage to 

The Marlin Fire Arms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



Ilii^^S^^^^^i^^teiia^l 



RECKEA TION. 



m 



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/is 






/IS 

/Is 
/♦s 

# 
/s 

/♦s 

/♦s 

/♦s 

/»s 

/IS 
/IS 
/IS 

! 

/IS 
/IS 

I 



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Smokeless Powders in Rifles 

have come into general use with wonderful rapidity, and many riflemen have tested 
the popular 30=30 MARLIN, getting with soft-nosed bullets results like these 

30-30-170 Marlm. 
30-30- \ 70 Marliru 





BEFORE. 

AFTER. 

But many men have found smokeless cartridges too expensive and too powerful 
for all occasions, and want a repeater in which black powder cartridges can ordinarily 
be used. THE 32=40 MARLIN and THE 38=55 MARLIN are now made of 
our "SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL," so that smokeless powder and jacketed 
bullets can be used in them when desired. The 32-40 smokeless, soft-nosed, gives 
results like these 



32-40-J65 Marlm. 



32-40-J65 Marlm. 





BEFORE. 

AFTER. 

THE OLD GUARD will be interested to know that all 1895 MODEL MARLINS 
have our SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL, so that smokeless powder and jacketed 
bullets can also be used in MARLIN REPEATERS of the following sizes : 

38-56 40-65 40-70 40-82 45-70 45-90 

The 45-calibres give results like these 

45-90-300 Marlin. 45-70-432 Marlin. 

45-90-300 Marlin. _ v 45-70-432 Marlin. 





BEFORK AFTER. 

SEE THAT YOUR BARREL IS STAMPED 




BEFORE. 



AFTER. 



ii 



Special Smokeless Steel 



t* 



%L 



We will mail you our 198-page Sportsman's Guide, giving full details and one thousand other 
interesting facts which all sportsmen should know, if you will send us stamps to pay postage. 

THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS CO. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



WS 



RECREA TION. 






S^RiD POT 

y^y 1898 PRIZE # V 

WALL PAPER 

'Best in style and quality. Lowest in price."— N. Y. World, Nov. 10, 1897. 

SAMPLES MAILED FREE 

upon request. Our papers are all high-class, and cheaper by far than your local 
dealer's prices. New Floral, Silk, Chintz, Delft, Denim Stripe effects, etc., for par- 
lors and bedrooms, 3c. to 1 Oc. per roll. Beautiful and high-class Tapestry, Damask, 
Colonial, Louis XIV., Empire, Byzantine, Moorish, Rococo, Embossed Leather, rich 
Floral and Satin effects, etc., etc., for parlors, dining-rooms and halls, at 10c, 12%c, 

1 5c, 18c and up to 25c. a roll. Write for samples, for these superior papers can only 

be bought from us or our agents. One price everywhere, and 

WE PAY THE FREIGHT 

All AfPTlt WjlTlt^d in every town to sell on commission from onr large sample books, 
ii.ll ii.gwl.1 TV a. 11 1 tu. SQ0W i n g hundreds of beautiful patterns. We furnish advertising 
cards and circulars with agent's name on free, and refer customers to them, who write us for 
samples. The business pays well from the start, for no local dealei can carry one-tenth the 
variety of designs and colorings, or sell as cheap. A pleasant and profitable business re- 
quiring no capital or experience. Over 8,000 agents are now selling our papers every year. 
For samples, of particulars about the agency, write to nearest address. 

NEMHRRK 



w *w^m% 



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STOP THE GAME!!! 



KILL THE UMPIRE? 



NO! 



Simply build a PAGE FENCE around the premises 
and you've got 'em. No obstruction to the view. 
Holds Buffalo, Deer, Elk, anything. 



Write for Particulars 

Mention Rf.crkation. 



PAGE WOVEN WIRE FENCE CO., Adrian, Mich. 



RECREA TION. 



vn 



>©^osoooooos<x 




Easy 
Take 



4 

9 

i 

6 



Dogs do not have any more fondness 
for medicine than their masters. When 
j|2^ it is necessary to treat them for Distem- 
per, Mange, Loss of Appetite, Fevers, 
and General Debility, it is almost cruel to dose them with nauseating 
mixtures. Throughout the world there are hundreds of sportsmen 
and lovers of dogs who always administer 

Sergeant's Condition Pills . 

which are gelatin coated and tasteless. There is no trouble in getting 
a dog to swallow them. 

These Condition Pills are both a tonic and an alterative. They 
stimulate a lagging appetite and put the digestive organs in perfect 
working order. A dog whose digestion is good is pretty apt to be 
healthy all over. His eye will be bright, his limbs supple, his spirits 
high and his scent keen. He will be worth a dozen languid, tired, 
ambitionless dogs. 

Sergeant's Condition Pills can do no harm. All they do is 
good. They are sure and certain, and are made from a formula 
possessed alone by the Polk Miller Drug Co., of Richmond, Va., by 
whom all of Sergeant's Dog Remedies are manufactured. 

Price $i.oo per box, by mail, postpaid. 

Worms in Dogs 

are quickly destroyed by Sergeant's " Sure Shot." Worms are 
the cause of more deaths among dogs than all other ailments com- 
bined. The timely use of "Sure Shot" will save the lives of 
puppies suffering with worms. 

Price 50 cents. Mailed to any address on receipt of price. 
For sale by all Druggists and Sporting Goods Dealers everywhere. 

Have you seen Polk Miller's new book, " Dogs — Their Ailments — 
How to Treat Them " ? You can have a copy free by simply asking 
for it ! 



Manufactured by the 



Polk Miller Drug Co., 



Richmond, Va. 




via 



RECREA TION. 



KEEP YOUR GUNS 



fi 



Clean 
Dry 




IN FULL VIEW 

and OF YOURSELF 

AND FRIENDS 

IN A 



RECREATION GUN CABINET. 



Recreation 

Gun Cabinet 

JMade of Oah or Cherry 

Height, 5 ft* JO inches* 

Width, 2 ft. 6 inches. 

Depth* J 2 inches* 

Good lock on door* 

Brass rail on top of case* 

Padded rack for 4 guns* 

Unsightly duffle in side spaces is 
hidden from view when door 
is closed* 

Unobstructed view of guns, ob- 
tained by use of one door* 

Plenty of room for shells, tools, and 
other Sportsmen's equipments* 



Made by G. S- HUDSON & SON 

ELLISBURG, N. Y. 

This Cabinet Given as a Premium for 25 New Sub- 
scriptions to RECREATION 



RECKEA TION. ix 



Fat is Necessary 

Fat is a necessary constituent of the body. It is the 
fuel that is changed, within the body, into Force and Energy. 

This is well illustrated by the fact that the more 
force a tissue displays, so much the more is it supplied with 
fat. For instance, the muscles have three per cent, of fat, 
the brain eight, and the ever=active nerves as high as 
twenty=two per cent. 

A certain percentage must be maintained in all the 
tissues of the body, or there will be suffering and disease. 

Yet this fat is very frequently wanting. 

Scott's Emulsion will supply it, however, in the form 
of cod liver oil. The oil is made into an Emulsion — that 
is, digested, ready to enter the blood at once. 

Once within the body it is very easily burned, oxi- 
dized, and a large amount of force and energy set free. 

This force appears to us as fluscular Force, Nervous 
Force and Digestive Force. It means stronger muscles, 
steadier nerves and better digestion. 

To secure these three exceedingly desirable conditions 
there is no remedy equal to Scott's Emulsion of cod liver 
oil with hypophosphites. 

SCOTT & BOWNE, NEW YORK 



RECREA 770 N. 





PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

Cree's CommoruSense Camp Stove. 

THE BEST IN USE. 



FURNITURE, 

WALL PAPER, 

FLOOR OIL CLOTH, CURTAINS, 

CREE'S COMMON-SENSE CAMP STOVE. 



^y^e^^dse^/zley >J/«y ...^s...^^, ,,..„„, tJ.GiTl* ,...x2j <*~^<£&lQ 



Mr, G. 0. Shields, Edr. , 

RECREATION, 19 W. 24 th St. , New York. 
Dear sir:- 

I keep a careful record of the results of 
all the advertising 1 do and 'find that RECREATION 
is credited with nearly as many sales of camp stoves 
as the other 6 magazines and sportsmen's journals 
that have carried my ad during f 97, all combined. 

Yours truly, 



jopfiM**- 



Nearly every man who places an ad. in RECREATION 
gives a report similar to the above, in effect. 

I have other letters in hand, that will be published 
in future numbers of RECREATION, and that are 
still stronger than this. 

Why not place your ad. where it will bring business? 



RECREA 770 N. 



XI 



<38) 



ORDER fro M the PERIODICAL DERT. op 

The Amerk^n News Company, 




New Yi 

answer by return on all goods you cannot plljrnish 

AT ONCE. 

SEND GOODS TO THE _ NEWS COMPANY 

(CLOSURE. BILLS AND ANSWER TO US. 





cpL^lj 



/ V* 



The proof of the pudding is in eating it. It is easy to claim a 
big circulation, but another thing to prove it. Here is another News 
Co.'s order. If you will refer to the one published on this page in 
February RECREATION, you will see that this calls for 600 copies more 
than that did. The returns of unsold copies are lighter every month 
than they were in the previous month. Apply to the American News 
Co., and they will verify this statement for you. 



L. L. BALES 

Box 439 
~— SEATTLE, WASH. 

& 

r\FFERS his services as guide for 
hunting, exploring and prospect- 
ing parties in Alaska and the N. W. 
Territory. He has lived in that re- 
gion 8 years, has travelled many 
thousands of miles through the in- 
terior, and is prepared to ^ivc ac- 
curate and reliable information con- 1 
cerning it. 




L. L. BALES 
ALASKAN HUNTER AND GUIDE 



REFERENCES 

Lieut. G. T. Emmons, U. S. Navy, Naval Dept., "Washington, D. C. 

"Will D. Jenkins, Secretary of State, Olympia, Wash. 
And the Editor of RECREATION 

Correspondence promptly answered "Will return to Alaska in March, '9& 



Xll 



RECREA TION. 



'T'HE finest Fishing and Hunting Grounds of the South are located 
along the lines of the 



PLANT 



SYSTEM 




SILVER KING, OR TARPON. 

Weight, 150 lbs. ; length, 6 feet 6 inches. Caught by HENRY B. PLANT, President Plant System of Railways and Steamships, 

at Fort Myers, Fla., U. S. A., April 8, 1897. Hooked with 18-ounce rod. 

Solid vestibuled train service from the East, in connection <with the Penn- 
sylvania R.R. and Atlantic Coast Line* Also fast trains from Savannah and 
Charleston, in connection ivith coashvise steamships* 

c Beautifully illustrated literature upon application. Send for copy 
44 Gun and Rod on the West Coast of Florida* " 

J. J. FARNSWORTH, Eastern Pass. Agt. L. A. BELL, Western Pass. Agt. 

261 Broadway, New York 205 Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 



H. B. PLANT, President 



B. W. WRENN, Pass. Traffic Manager 



RECREA TION. 



xin 




No. i. Genuine Diamonds 
and Ruby, Turquoise, or 
Opal Centre, $5. 

No. 2. Five Opals, or Tur- 
quoise, $3. 

No. 3. Pure White Diamonds 
and any Stone Centre, $5. 

No. 4- $8. 




WATCH AND PIN 

No. 10. Sterling Silver, $5. 
14-Karat Gold, $10. 
With Diamonds, $25. 

We warrant these Watches 
Correct Time-keepers, and 
repair them free of charge 
five years. 



Iflrs. t Cvncb 



\ & 3 UNION SQUARE 
CORNER 14th STREET 

...NEW YORK... 



Diamond importer 
and manufacturer 




No. 8. Diamond Links, 
$3.50. Same in Cuff 
Buttons. 




TYTE import Diamonds in the 
rough and save 15 per 
cent. duty. Make our own set- 
tings and save 25 per cent. You 
save 40 per cent, by purchasing No# 9 A n Diamonds, $15 

Diamonds, Ruby Cen- 
of US, as we Still have the regU- tre, $12. Diamonds, 

Turquoise, Opal, or 
lar profit Sapphire Centre, $10. 



Illustrated Catalogue mailed 
free, filled 'with Bargains 




No. 383. Single Diamond, 



Goods Sent for 
Inspection. 



Satisfaction 
Guaranteed or 
Money Refunded 



Established 1844 




No. 6. Star. Perfectly White Dia- 
monds, $40. 



xiv RECREA TION. 



Something New 

IN WINTER WEAR 
FOR SPORTSMEN 

* * * 

Squires' " Chamois=Buckskin " Suits... 

** Chamois-Buckskin " makes the warmest of -warm underclothing for every pur- 
pose where a combination of lightness and warmth is desired. It has all the good 
points of the popular Swedish dogskin, with the enormous additional advantages of 
being as washable as a silk handkerchief, and so strong and serviceable that there is 
practically no wear out to it. 

For duck shooting, camping in cold climates, or for the Klondike, where the cold 
seems fairly to pierce one's marrow, nothing that we know of can take the place of 
a u Chamois-Buckskin " suit. 

For trap shooting in cold weather, where the arms must be kept free, a ** Chamois- 
Buckskin " shirt over the ordinary woolen undershirt defies the cold, and is the 
most valuable cold-weather garment any man can have. The shirts are made 
with turn-over collars. 

For the Klondike these ** Chamois-Buckskin " suits are simply invaluable. They 
are worn over the woolen underclothing and next to the furs, and simply prevent 
the cold from penetrating. 

Price of the suit complete, = = = = = $15.00 

Price of shirt, = = = = = = 9.00 

Price of drawers, ».■-.-- = 6.50 

Dogskin Fur Suits . . . 

In making up our Johnson Sleeping Bags, we have had occasion to purchase a very 
large number of the finest quality, extra heavy dogskins, all of them from dogs 
killed above the snow line in the Himalaya Mountains. We are making these furs 
up into suits, for the Klondike trade and for driving, hunting, etc. Three-piece 
suits (coats, pants and headpiece), all lined with excellent woolen cloth. 

Price per suit, = = _ = = = $35.00 

Two=piece suits (coat with headpiece attached and pants), 

price per suit, = = = = = = 32.50 

Coat separate, without headpiece, - 18.50 

Headpiece, = = = = = = - 8.00 

Johnson Sleeping Bags . . . 

These are becoming the recognized thing for the Klondike, and we have sold 
more of them within the last month than we had any idea we could sell in a year. 
The reason for their success is because they are strictly sanitary, and no other 
Sleeping Bag that we know of is. 

The No. 1 Bag is lined with Himalaya Dogskin, price, $18.00 

The No. 2 Bag is lined with barktanned wool sheepskins, 15.00 
The No. 3 Bag is lined with heavy double army blankets, 12.00 

*■ * * 
We have a large stock of goods for Klondike outfitting and for sportsmen generally 

HENRY C. SQUIRES & SON 

20 CORTLANDT STREET .... NEW YORK 

Mention RECREATION 



RECREATION. 



xv 



VOU need something to 
build you up, to insure 
a Healthy Appetite, and 
to bring refreshing sleep. 
Then, why not try 

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IfoBesTTonic 

It is a Tower of Strength 
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Paixst 
Malt Extinct 

IfoBesTTomc 

is of special value, as it 
combines both Tonic and 
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PA5ST PERFECTED BREWING IN AMERICA 



XVI 



R EC RE A TION. 



Racine Boat mffl. Co. "££2^ 



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CANOES 

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$200 



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Steel Launches 



A 20th-century Electro Vapor Launch that will seat comfortably six persons, carry 
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lutely safe, and guaranteed for one year, or money refunded. 

This is no row boat, but a well-designed, sea-going Launch, with steel, water-tight bulkheads. 

A modern, up-to-date " Half Rater," designed for racing purposes. Hollow spars, 
RtlVS special sails, Tobin bronze fastenings, gun-metal fittings, lignum-vitae blocks. 
** " Finished in quarter-sawed oak, and guaranteed to be equal to any $350 craft 

turned out. 



Built and carried in stock from 25 ft. up. 
inspect them. We guarantee satisfaction. 



Write us about them, or call and 



$18 Buys 



A fine modeled and well-built Canoe, with paddle and seat. 

A fine modeled Row Boat. Seats three. Fitted with oars and oarlocks. 



We guarantee our work 



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We solicit your wants 




Send 10 cents for large illustrated catalogue, describing our output, consisting of Sea-going Steam Yachts, 
Schooners, Cutters, Sloops, Fin Keels, Knockabouts, Raters, Cat Boats, Sails, Fittings, etc. We can save you 
money and give you results. Address 

RACINE BOAT MFG. CO., Riverside, Racine, Wis. 

Chicago Salesroom, 62-64 Wabash Avenue 




"A RUNNING BUCKER." 

From drawings by Frederic Remington. Published by R. II. 
Copyright by Davis & Sandford. 



Russell. 



Volume VUI. 



RECREATION. 

MARCH, 1898. 

G. 0. SHIELDS (C0QU1NA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 3. 



THE WOLF THAT GOT AWAY. 



LIEUT. E. L. MUNSON, U. S. A. 



My horse slipped and floundered 
his way through the snow banks, 
which the first storm of the season 
had drifted into the cross coulees, 
and over the cut banks of Big 
Sandy creek. I was watching for 
sign of a big dog wolf known to 
haunt that locality, and whose 
great footprints had often been 
seen in the muddy cattle crossings, 
during the summer and autumn. 
At early dawn the snow ceased 
falling, and the wind, which had 
blown furiously throughout the 
night, subsided. The conditions 
were perfect for tracking ; and an 
hour's ride in the dim light of early 
morning brought me close to the 
usual route of the wolf. I turned 
in the saddle to watch the shivering 
pack of greyhounds, staghounds 
and kangaroo dogs, stringing in 
single file down the trail. It did 
not seem possible that any animal, 
starting within a reasonable dis- 
tance, could get away from, or 
stand up against, such a fast and 
savage lot of fighters. The 9 big 
powerful hounds, representing the 
pick of several packs, had all been 
trained on wolves from puppyhood. 
Any 2 of them would kill a coyote 
with ease. Headed by the kanga- 
roo hound Spot, who, all alone, had 
several times run down and killed 
coyotes, they looked able to ham- 
string and throttle the largest wolf, 
in short order. Besides, I was 
prepared, with hunting knife and 



heavy revolver, to take a hand in 
the game, if it should be necessary. 
At the foot of the bluff one of 
the keen-nosed staghounds loped 
ahead a few yards, and eagerly 
snuffed at a long line of depressions 
in the snow. There they were — 
tracks as large as the palm of a 
man's hand, and exactly where I 
expected they would be found. For 
the grey wolf has his regular beat, 
and seldom fails to hunt, nightly, 
over the same ground. The tracks 
were fresh. The wolf had evi- 
dently discovered the approach 
of the pack ; for his jog-trot along 
the creek bottom, had suddenly 
changed to a long lope, as he turned 
up a shallow coulee toward the 
prairie beyond. He was evidently 
not far away ; and believing that he 
was trying to circle back to the 
rough country to the W r est, I hur- 
ried toward a long ridge several 
hundred yards distant. This af- 
forded an easy ascent of the other- 
wise almost precipitous bluffs. I 
intended to climb the ridge and in- 
tercept the wolf. If I succeeded, 
the dogs, previously held well un- 
der control, could be started and 
the wolf forced to run out on the 
flat prairie, where he could not de- 
lay or divide the pack. Unfortu- 
nately for this well laid plan, the 
eager hounds, aware that a chase 
was in prospect, broke from re- 
straint. Three ran ahead and to 
the left ; while the remaining 6 beat 



171 




"THE NEXT INSTANT THE HOUND WENT WHIRLING DOWN THE STEEP HANK. 



THE WOLF THAT GOT AWAY. 



*73 



up the right slope of the ridge, a 
short distance in the rear. As my 
horse climbed the last few feet of 
the ascent, the wolf came in view, 
something over 100 yards away. 
He went loping off in his loose- 
jointed, shambling way, along the 
cattle trail which followed the 
brink of the steep bluffs. 

He was an immense old fellow. 
In his long winter coat he appeared 
as large as a calf. He seemed to 
have no possible chance of escape. 
The ground was excellent for cours- 
ing. At so short a distance, the 
hounds should stop him within a 
quarter of a mile ; and, big as he 
was, there were dogs enough to 
tear him to shreds. Jerking the 
revolver from its holster, I turned 
to start the pack. At that mo- 
ment, up bounced a jack rabbit; 
out of sight of the dogs in front, 
but almost in the midst of the 6 
in the rear. Shouting, I spurred 
the horse out on the prairie, hoping 
to draw one or 2 of the dogs with 
me. They had seen no wolf; and, 
as the rabbit danced tantalizingly 
along the slope, they turned on 
him with eyes and ears for nothing 
else. After a short dash he was 
caught and killed. 

The remaining 3 dogs were out 
of sight of the rest of the pack. 
They rushed over the bank at my 
shout, and, sighting the wolf, at 
once gave chase ; but, being hin- 
dered by snow-drifts, they soon 
became separated. The wolf nei- 
ther changed his course nor quick- 
ened his pace, apparently disdain- 
ing to run from the dogs. As the 
foremost hound reached him and 
jumped for a throat hold, the wolf 
turned and caught the dog by the 
head. The next instant, the hound 



went whirling down the steep bank, 
trying desperately to stop his prog- 
ress over the snow-drifts that broke 
his fall. I could not tell whether 
the hound was tossed over the 
cliff, or whether he jumped over to 
escape the fangs of his assailant. 
At all events, he was completely 
out of the fight, as direct ascent of 
the steep bluffs was impossible. 

At this moment, the big and sav- 
age staghound, Happy Jack, dashed 
in and attacked the wolf. Twist- 
ing around in his loose skin, as only 
a wolf can, the brute shook off the 
powerful dog as he might a terrier. 
Then turning on him, he tore a 
great piece from the dog's shoulder, 
and crushed in several of his ribs 
like pasteboard. The arrival of 
the 3d dog, diverted the wolf's 
attention from his yelping victim. 
Turning, he made off up the creek ; 
the dog cutting at his flanks, and 
he, at every few yards, charging 
his tormentor. Finally, a lucky 
snap gashed the hound across the 
neck, and he faltered and looked 
back for assistance. Seeing me 
riding up as fast as the drifts would 
permit, he turned again after the 
wolf, but in trying to make a short 
cut he jumped in a snowbank 
which filled up a shallow coulee. 
Floundering out he slowly trotted 
back to me. At this moment the 
main pack, having finished the rab- 
bit, came in sight over the Eastern 
bank, half a mile away, just as the 
third dog scrambled up to the prai- 
rie near me. Turning to the West- 
ward, I saw a gaunt, grey shape 
lope to the mouth of a rough cou- 
lee, a quarter of a mile distant. It 
stopped, looked back, then disap- 
peared in the brush, where I knew 
it would be useless to follow. 



ON EDUCATING THE HORSE. 



DR. J. C. HENNESSY. 



Many people may know more of the 
horse, in general, than I do; but I have yet 
to meet any one who has more love for 
horses than I have. I am especially inter- 
ested in the training and educating of 
horses that have been spoiled or made to 
balk; and in teaching horses to perform. I 
have a horse that was sold me 3 years ago 
because the owner was afraid of him. This 
animal had run away and had demolished 
several rigs. I have since raced him 3 



are more balky drivers than balky horses. 
When horses balk whipping will not make 
them go. They have been cut to pieces, 
fires have been built under them, ropes tied 
to their tongue and that member pulled out 
by the roots, but they have never moved. 
All of this is inhuman and places the per- 
petrator beneath the brute. A horse balks 
because he is abused; because the harness 
hurts him; perhaps because the whipple 
tree strikes his hocks every time he at- 




WHEN I TELL PRINCE TO KISS ME. 



times and have won each time, giving him 
a record close to 2.20. Notwithstanding 
his reputation, I paid $150 for him. After 
driving him one month I could start him 
trotting, throw the lines out of the buggy, 
snap the whip, and he would stand still. 
One day when I was driving him the axle 
of a wheel broke and he absolutely refused 
to run away. This was simply because I 
was kind to him and understood his dis- 
position. He was a high-strung animal 
and could never be whipped into doing 
anything. I am always kind but firm, and 
when he is within hearing distance he will 
obey me. If your horse balks it is your 
fault and not that of the animal. There 



tempts to move, or for some other good 
reason. He gets stubborn and nothing 
can move him unless you distract his 
thoughts. Have him forget his anger and 
he will be all right. There are many ways 
of doing this. People have been known 
to pour shot in the animal's ear, or whirl 
him around by catching hold of the bridle 
and tail; but this is entirely unnecessary 
and inhuman. The best way, and one that 
has never failed me, is to advance cheerfully 
toward the animal, pat him, speak kindly to 
him, take hold of the bit, raise his head 
and blow gently in his nostrils. As soon 
as he throws his ears forward in astonish- 
ment, start him and he will go. This will 



174 




KNEELING. 




SITTING DOWN. 

i75 




TAKING LIFE EASY. 



save many a hunter hours of torture and 
unpleasantness, in the mountains, if he hap- 
pens to have trouble with his horse. 

The first and easiest trick to teach a 
horse is to say " no." Stand on the left 
side and with a tack prick him gently on 
the withers. He will shake his head. Ask 
him a question, at the same instant you 
prick him, and after a while he will get 
so used to the inflection of your voice that 
he will shake his head every time you ask, 
without the use of the tack. To teach him 
to say " yes " prick him on the breast. Be 
gentle, so he will not get in the habit of 
snapping at you. For instance, ask him if 
he likes politics and he will shake his head 
" no." Ask him if he reads Recreation, 
and he will nod his head " yes." Next, 
teach him to lie down. Some teach this 
trick by the aid of ropes. The easiest way 
is to take the horse out of the stall, or, 
better, after a drive, just after unhitching, 
while he is sweating, lead him to the corral, 
and say " Lie down, sir." He will obey, 
because he wants to roll. After he gets up 
give him some sugar and pet him. After 
doing this several times he learns what is 
wanted of him and finds that by obeying he 
gets his sugar. 

Next you wish him to kneel. This is 
easy, as he must always kneel to lie down. 
By holding the rope, you can allow him 
only to kneel, after which you give him 
sugar and pet him. 



To teach him to sit up it is first neces- 
sary to make him lie down. Then say, 
" Get up, sir." By holding the rope, allow 
him to get up on the front feet only. 

Next you wish him to open a box. Get 
one with hinges and have the lid extend a 
little over the box. Allow him to eat out 
of it several times, being sure to close the 
lid frequently while he is eating. He will 
see you throw the lid back and in a short 
time will do so himself, that he may eat the 
grain. After this be sure to pet him. In 
a short time you can send him from a dis- 
tance to the box and he will open the lid. 

To teach him to kiss you is the easiest 
of all. If he likes candy, as all pets do, 
place a piece in your mouth and he will 
reach for it. Say, " Kiss me, sir," and he 
will attempt to get it. He will, become 
accustomed to the command, after a few 
times, and will obey the order without the 
candy. 

Next you wish him to stand on a barrel. 
Lead him to a box, about 5 or 6 inches 
high, being sure to have it solid so it will 
not turn. After getting him as close to it 
as possible raise one hoof and place it on 
the box, then raise the other and place it 
by the first, after which give him the usual 
reward. As he gets used to this trick in- 
crease the height of the box until you have 
it as high as you wish and he will climb up 
to get the sugar. 

Teach him to shake hands by picking up 



176 




PRINCE, REX, GLADYS, SHAKESPEARE AND ME. 



his hoof and, at the same time, giving the 
command, " Shake hands, sir." 

To teach a horse to tell his age, or the 
time of day, or to multiply, subtract or add 
numbers is the hardest of all and requires 
a great amount of manoeuvring on the 
part of the trainer. Get him impatient and 
he will begin to paw the ground with his 
hoof. Pat him every time and he soon 
learns what you want. The hard part is 
to make him stop at the right number. Of 
course there is a key to this and any easy 
method may be used. I stand close to my 
horse and nudge him with my elbow, when 
I want him to stop. For instance, I ask 
him to multiply 7x2 and he paws 14 times. 
To have him stop I nudge him just after 
he paws the thirteenth time, and he stops 
on the fourteenth. Train him to stop, to 
turn corners, and to turn around in this 
way. When driving go the same way a 
number of times, always turning to go 
home in the same place and being careful 
to turn slowly. Say, " Whoa " and then, 
" Turn around, sir." After a little coaxing 
with the rein he will do this. In a little 
while he will know what is required of him 
every time you ask him to turn. 



Get him used to your gun by driving him 
with an open bridle, and, for the first few 
times, shooting back from the buggy. By 
proper handling he will, after a time, stop 
when you level your gun to shoot or, as 
my horse does, when he sees anything to 
shoot at. 

Teach your horse to play tag by giving 
some person his sugar and having him run 
from the horse. The animal will learn to 
put his ears back, show his teeth and run 
for the sugar. This should only be taught 
horses that are perfectly gentle, as it makes 
them cross. When they find people are 
afraid of them they always enjoy frighten- 
ing them. 

Many horses are considered of no value 
because the owner does not know how 
they should be shod. I shall be pleased 
to answer any communications from peo- 
ple who wish to know how to shoe horses, 
how to avoid interfering, forging, or 
any of the bad habits horses may have. 
All can be rectified if. people only know 
how. 

Remember you can only teach a horse 
through kindness. As soon as you lose 
patience he will be spoiled. 



177 



SOME DEER, A BEAR AND A MOOSE. 



W. H. WRIGHT. 



After I became old enough to read hunt- 
ing stories, my chief ambition was to shoot 
a deer or a bear; but as I lived in a part 
of the country that did not produce such 
game, I had to content myself by reading 
of the exploits of more fortunate sports- 
men. 

I lived at home the allotted time, and 
graduated in everything a Yankee can 
think of — except book learning. Then I 
drifted about New England, until, at last, 
I had an opportunity to go West. Here, I 
thought, was the chance I had longed for, 
so many years, to secure some shots at big 
game. 

I packed my trunk, bought a 44-40-200 
Winchester rifle, and in May, '83, left Prov- 
idence, R. I., for Portland, Ore. During 
the trip I made inquiry as to the hunting, 
in different parts of the country we were 
to pass through. After I had summed up 
all the information obtained, I concluded 
to stop at Spokane Falls. I learned that 
at this place one could get good deer hunt- 
ing, and that good bear hunting could be 
had in some parts of the surrounding 
country. 

In due time we arrived in Spokane, and 
after looking the place over — it was not 
much of a town in those days — I pitched a 
small tent, which I had brought with me, 
on the river bank at the foot of the falls. 
It was not the time of year to hunt, so 
every day I would take the old 44, and try 
it at ducks on the river, and at magpies 
which came to my camp. 

When summer had passed and harvest 
had begun, I could contain myself no 
longer; so one morning I saddled a cayuse 
which I had bought and started for the 
hills, some 20 miles from town. I had been 
told by an old rancher that deer were quite 
plenty there, and he thought I would have 
no trouble in " rounding up one." 

I started about 3 a.m., and arrived at the 
rancher's place a little after sunrise. He 
directed me up-a small stream which flowed 
from the hills in question. Two miles or 
more up this stream, I struck deer tracks. 
They were fresh, as the water that dripped 
from their feet after they crossed the 
stream had not yet dried on the leaves. 

I had never seen a deer and was deter- 
mined to have a shot at one. Making sure 
they had gone up stream, I proceeded to 
trail them as best I could on the dry 
ground. For a while I had no trouble, but 
as I got further into the hills the ground 
became hard and rocky, and I could no 
longer follow by trail, but had to go by 
guess. I have often thought of that trip 
since, and laughed at the guesses I made 



then as to which way a deer would be likely 
to go. 

Coming to a fork of the creek, where I 
could see no signs of the deer, I had to 
make another guess as to which fork the 
game was on. I took the left hand branch, 
as this ran through a small canyon. On 
the left bank was quite a hill, covered with 
small brush and scattering trees. I thought 
the deer would be likely to go that way and 
perhaps lie down in the underbrush. 

So I proceeded carefully up the hill, and 
about half way up, saw the tracks of a large 
deer. These tracks I knew were not the 
ones I had started out on, as they were 
much larger. I crept along the hill where 
I thought the deer would most likely be 
lying, and when there seemed no necessity 
for caution, I would hurry along to the 
next place, where I was sure I would jump 
the deer. 

Just as I had made one of these fine 
sneaks, I came to the top of the first bench 
on the hill, and before me was a small sad- 
dle, covered with brush and small fir trees. 
This, I took to be a place where a deer 
would not be fool enough to stop. There 
was another good location beyond this 
saddle, where he would be sure to tarry for 
a while, and I shouldered my gun and went 
tearing down into the saddle. I had not 
gone more than 100 yards when I heard 
something thumping, and looking up, saw 
a buck charging up the hill. 

His head was thrown back, and he was 
just touching the ground in the high places, 
with the tips of his toes. He would go into 
the air stiff legged, clear a bunch of brush 
and hit the next mound, and so on up the 
hill. There I stood with open mouth, and 
with no idea I had a gun, until the deer 
was about to disappear over the next rise. 
Then up came the old 44, a shot rang out, 
and a branch fell to the ground from a pine 
tree, 20 feet over the deer. This was my 
first deer hunt. 

In the next hunt I was more successful, 
as I bagged my deer. But for several years 
I found the difficulty in securing game, 
lay in not knowing its habits. I would 
hunt in places where now I would no more 
think of going than I would think of fish- 
ing on dry land. 

After I had killed a few deer, I began to 
think it would be safe to make a trip for 
bear; and after a little experience I gave 
up all other game, to hunt bear. But I 
have never hunted them with a 44 since I 
ran up against my first grizzly. 

Several years of hunting big game taught 
me that I must give up my old ideas. I 
had all along tried to make myself believe 



178 




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RECREA TION. 



the game was a little " off " in seeking out 
such unlikely spots to lie in during the 
day. 

I studied the habits of the deer at differ- 
ent seasons, and hunted them accordingly. 
Now, I feel quite disappointed if in a day's 
tramp from camp, I do not have an op- 
portunity for a shot at whatever kind of 
game I am looking for. 

I have found that hunters who have 
made the habits of game a study, are the 
most successful. 

To show how a fellow can miss it and 
think there is no game in the country, I 
will give you one instance that happened 
in a party of which I was a member. 

We were camped in the Clearwater coun- 
try, in the Bitter Root mountains. One 
of the party had never killed a grizzly bear 
or a moose, and was anxious to kill both. 

Years ago. in that locality it was an easy 
matter to do so; but since the trappers 
have killed so many large animals to bait 
bear traps with, it is not so easy to find 
game. 

West of where we were camped was a 
country that had been swept by fire for 3 
or more miles to the West and 15 or 20 
miles North and South. About 3 miles 
West was a divide, and every mile or more 
toward the North, along this summit, was 
the head of a small creek which flowed 
East. Opposite each of these creeks, was 
one flowing West. 

Six or 7 miles Northwest of camp was 
another divide which ran East and West. 
The summit was a large marsh or meadow, 
and at times was quite a resort for grizzly 
bear and moose. 

A few years ago, one would have to try 
harder to miss game there, than he now 
would to find it. But since the game has 
been so hunted for bear bait, it does not 
use these large open marshes as in former 
years; but seeks some small marsh at the 
head of one of the creeks, and will not 
range out for weeks at a time. 

The man who wanted the moose and 
bear, hunted early and late, but could see 
nothing but elk and deer, and a few moose 
tracks. 

West of camp, a half mile or more, was 
a small stream. As often as once a week 
we would see the tracks of a very large 
moose, crossing from the head of this creek 
to some one of the others. 

One morning, after hunting this burned 
ridge and the large marsh to the North- 
west, my friend gave up hope of finding 
game there. He suggested that I make a 
trip and get some meat for camp. I took 
m Y 30-30 Marlin. and struck out for the big 
marsh to see if I could find a grizzly; not 
that I cared to kill one, but more to see if 
there were any working the marsh. 

Until I crossed the divide to the West, 
I saw no signs of game. Before I reached 



the marsh I stopped at a small spring to 
drink. I heard something moving below 
where I sat, and soon an old cow elk came 
out. 

It was such a bad place to pack the meat 
out from, that I decided to let her pass, and 
trust to luck to find something in a more 
accessible place, so I proceeded on my way. 
On the divide at the head of the marsh is 
a narrow pine ridge, with a small lake. 
Just as I reached the East end of the lake, 
I heard quite a scratching and snuffing, in 
the small pines on the Western shore. 

Keeping behind trees and what cover I 
could find, I worked my way slowly to 
within 40 yards of the source of the noise. 
Looking from behind a tree, I saw an old 
grizzly turning up rocks in search of ants 
and grubs. My fingers itched to put one of 
the little 30' s into his hide: but as we had 
been trying to capture one alive, and had 
camped for 6 weeks in this place for that 
purpose, I did not fire. After watching 
the bear turn over 3 or 4 rocks, I quietly 
withdrew, and continued down the stream. 

For 3 miles I saw nothing except some 
old tracks of moose and elk. These grew 
less frequent as I got further down stream. 
I decided to strike Southeast to camp, 
which was 7 or 8 miles away. 

On the way I had to cross 3 or 4 small 
streams running to the East. 

Near the divide was the head of a small 
stream which flowed West into the stream 
I was then on. I had never been at the 
head of this, but from the divide had looked 
down on a small marsh. This contained 
perhaps a *4 section, and was dotted here 
and there with small water holes and 
clumps of trees, and covered with tall grass. 

As I had found nothing as yet for camp 
I decided to pay this marsh a visit, and see 
what was there. Coming to the top of the 
ridge, I saw, 150 yards from the lower end 
of the marsh, a large moose, with a fine set 
of antlers. At first I thought of shooting 
him; then I remembered the fellow who 
had hunted so faithfully, and decided to 
let him try to find the moose the next day. 

Just then, another large moose emerged 
from a clump of trees, near the first one. 
and joined him. 

Both moose moved into the clump of 
trees. They were nearly in the middle of 
the group, when another arose from the 
grass and started to join the procession. 
This was more than I could stand. The 
last moose was not so large as the others, 
and I thought perhaps the fellows at camp 
would overlook the shooting of a small 
one. As he entered the timber, I cut loose 
with a left quartering shot, but could not 
see that it had any effect on the moose. 
He was over 150 yards away, and as I had 
shot this gun but little. I was not sure 
I could hit him at that distance. The gun 
was one I had had made, and I think was 



SOME DEER. A BEAR AND .1 MOOSE. 



181 



the first the Marlin people ever built. The 
barrel was but [8 inches long, with a short 
magazine that held only 2 cartridges. 

As the moose entered the timber, I took 
another shot. This time I knew, as soon 
as I pulled the trigger, that the bullet would 
go wild. Just as 1 shot, the moose swung 
to the right. 

They left the trees on the farther side, 
and all 3 stopped and looked back. Here 
was an opportunity for a good shot. The 
one I had fired at was behind, and stand- 
ing with his side toward me. Just beyond, 
and in line, stood the others. I was shoot- 
ing solid point bullets; and was afraid that 
if I hit the moose shot at, the ball might 
pass on and wound another. I did not care 
to risk wounding the 2 larger moose, and 
did not fire. 

After looking a moment, all turned and 
2 went across the marsh. The smaller one 
made his way up the meadow toward the 
head of the creek, and before he passed 
from view behind a clump of trees, I gave 
him a shot. 

I saw I would not get another shot 
from where I was; so decided to go to 
where he had been when I first shot at him, 
and see if there was any evidence of a hit. 
I thought I must have hit with one of the 
shots, or the moose would not have sepa- 
rated. Besides the others had stopped at 
the edge of the burnt timber, after leaving 
the marsh, and had looked back in the 
direction the last had taken. 

In the windfall where I fired the second 
shot, the moose had passed through a pool 
of water. This was red with blood, so I 
knew I had hit him; but how badly re- 
mained to be seen. The first bullet sent 
after him was a soft nose, and I knew if it 
had struck the right spot, the moose would 
be mine. 

At the clump of trees where I had taken 



the last shot, I looked to the upper end of 
the marsh. There 1 saw the mi tnd- 

ing, swinging his head from side to side, 
and apparently badly hurt. 

I crept to the right, and across the 
marsh. The edge of the- swamp was [ringed 
with thick brush, and in this 1 crawled. 
Whenever the moose swung his head from 
me, I would sneak along; all the while- 
prepared to fire if the moose showed any 
sign of leaving. 

Five minutes of crawling brought me 
within 25 or 30 yards of the animal. The 
old fellow seemed very sick. The first bul- 
let had struck high above his flank; and 
not far enough forward to make the shot 
immediately fatal. 

Directly in front of the moose, and 10 or 
15 yards from him, was a large tree. This 
I determined to reach, and see what he 
would do when he saw me so close to him. 
I figured that he would charge me; and 
that I must either drop him at the next 
shot, or shin the tree. In a few moments 
I reached the tree, and from behind it took 
a good look at the moose. He was a fine 
old fellow, and I began to repent that I 
had shot so noble a creature: but the heart 
of a hunter is hard, and I had now wound- 
ed the beast, and must put him out of pain. 

Making sure that the little gun was 
properly loaded, I stepped from behind the 
tree. The moose did not seem, at first, to 
understand the situation; but when he did 
up went every hair on his back. Lowering 
his head, he made a bound in my direction. 
As he struck the ground, the little gun 
spoke. The ball entered between his neck 
and shoulder, and he died without a 
tremor. 

In dressing him, we found he was badly 
torn inside, showdng that the small gun 
was equal to the task given it. I w r ant noth- 
ing larger than a 30, even for moose. 



A SONG OF SPRING-TIME. 
(After the German of Geible.) 



T. 



In the emerald hedges deep. 
Through the elm trees olden. 

Wondrous whispers softly creep 
In springtime sunlight, golden. 



Says each little leaf " God greet! " 

To its leafy neighbor; 
Everything breathes, deep and sweet, 

Holy rest from labor. 



While on bush each leaf and flow'r 
Rocks itself in morning glow. 

In vernal breath of magic power, 
My soul is rocking to and fro. 



HUNTING WITH A CAMERA. 

IV. 
THE NIGHTHAWK. 

W. E. CARLIN. 



The illustrations in this issue are of the 
common nighthawk, which is numerous in 
the high plateaus of the Bitter Root moun- 
tains. It nests on the dry, bare ground, 
laying 2 eggs, and feeds mainly in the even- 
ing. Just after sunset the nighthawks ap- 
pear, darting about with open mouth and 
catching everything in the way of gnats, 
flies and mosquitoes that happens to be on 
the wing. The most noticeable feature of 
this bird is the discordant screeching, 



great difficulty one of these birds can be 
seen, even at distances of a few feet. 

As may be seen from the photos, the 
colors of the bird and the background are 
closely alike and it was difficult to get a 
print of sufficient contrast to show the 
birds well. 

They are easy to approach, when asleep, 
if one moves slowly and quietly; but we 
were unable to get good pictures of them 
at any other time. 




THE NIGHTHAWK. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. E. CARLIN. 



booming sound caused by his wings, as 
he cuts the air in his bold zig-zag flight. 

The nighthawk frequently rests on the 
ground, on rocks and on limbs, during 
Tiis feeding time. 

In strong sunlight they see but imper- 
fectly, and when disturbed, in daytime, 
have a halting, uncertain flight. Being a 
delicate bird and entirely denfenceless it is 
a wonder they do not all fall a prey to the 
numerous hawks and " varmints " that in- 
fest the mountains. It is undoubtedly due 
to their protective coloration, which so 
closely resembles the rocks, dead limbs, 
and dry, gravel covered ground, that they 
are not all killed and eaten. It is with 



It is not uncommon to find the female 
asleep beside her nest; while those found 
asleep on limbs or logs were invariably sit- 
ting lengthwise of the latter — never cross- 
wise. 

All the photos reproduced herewith were 
made on Corbutt's cut films. No. 27 Ortho, 
with a Dallmeyer No. 2 Telephoto lens. 
The exposures were usually about 3 sec- 
onds. 

Mr. W. T. Hornaday, the well known 
naturalist, writes of the nighthawk in these 
words: 

Every person who abhors the common- 
place, in things and in creatures, should 




NIGHTHAWK AND EGG. 



like the nighthawk. In all that he is and 
does, he is a genuine oddity. He has the 
soft plumage of the owl, the feeble beak and 
yawning throat of a swift, a mustache of 
stiff hairs that is all his own, and a pair of 



big white spots underneath each wing by 
which his friends can always recognize him 
when in flight. And his habits are quite as 
odd as his make-up. 

He feeds in the air, by swooping grace- 




SLEEPING. 

183 



184 



RECREA TION. 



fully upon the insects that think to evade 
the birds with less wing power. I have 
spent hours in watching him at work in his 
mid-air feeding-grounds, waiting patiently 
for him to do " the drop act " once more. 
His habit of half closing his wings and 
dropping head first toward the earth, with 
such a hollow whirr and jar that he is 
sometimes called the night-jar, is one of the 
most astonishing tricks performed by a 
wild bird. True, there are other birds that 
fall through the air upon their prey — most 
hawks do it — but to me the performance 
of the nighthawk always seemed more 
thrilling. 

I am glad to say I have never known 
anyone so much in error regarding the 
habits of this queer bird as to charge him 
with catching chickens. Possibly the idea 



— if it still prevails, anywhere — arose from 
the nighthawk's name. But, speaking of 
protective coloration: if a nighthawk sit- 
ting sidewise on an oak limb, and saying 
nothing, does not look as natural as any 
knot that ever grew, I would not say so. 
Do not kill him, boys, even if you discover 
him. He is a good fellow, he works hard 
for a living, harms nobody, and he does 
more good in the world than a great many 
men. Watch him, study him, and surely 
you will be interested. Don't kill him; for 
his skin is like wet tissue paper, and you 
would not have the patience to mount him, 
even if you knew how. As an old friend of 
my boyhood, I wish him long life, pros- 
perity, and millions of insects every day of 
his life. 

W. T. H. 



NORTHERN SHARP-TAIL GROUSE. 



JOHN BOYD. 



The Northern sharp-tailed grouse (Pedi- 
oecetes phasiancllus) is the boreal represent- 
ative of the species, and is distinct, in many 
respects, from the Southern variety, which 
is known as the Columbian sharp-tailed 
grouse. Both of these are popularly 
spoken of as " prairie chickens " ; but 



wrongly so, as that appellation really be- 
longs to the pinnated grouse. 

The range of the present species is from 
the Southern boundary of Manitoba, 
Northward to the Arctic regions; although 
these last few years we find some that have 
abandoned the prairies for the woods, and 




NORTHERN SHARP-TAILED GROUSE (PED/CECETES PHASIANELLUS). 



A NIGHT'S BASS FISHING. 



"»5 



moved Eastward through Algoma to Lake 
Temiscamingue, and South to the Parry 
sound District of Ontario. 

Those taken in the neighborhood of 
Lake Temiscamingue might well be called 
a sub-species, as the markings are much 
darker than on those found in the West. 
The districts to which they have perma- 
nently migrated are heavily wooded, and a 
change of habit therefore became a neces- 
sity, so that now we find them in this re- 
spect identical with the ruffed grouse 
(Bonasa umbellus). 

In the early spring, the birds pair off. 
Some authorities believe they are guilty of 
polygamy. Shortly after mating, those fan- 
tastic " grouse dances," and drummings, 
are indulged in by the over exuberant 
lovers. These performances have given 
rise to a lot of imaginative nonsense, on the 
part of writers who get their knowledge of 
birds from the " stuffing " process of some 
guide, whose ideas of truth and accuracy, 
are limited only by the credulity of his lis- 
teners. 

The Northern sharp-tail lays its eggs in 
June, in a nest roughly constructed, on the 
ground, but cosily lined with feathers. 
There are usually 11 to 13 eggs in the 
clutch, of a grayish olive color, with closely 
dotted pin-head spots of brown. 

When the young are hatched, the whole 
family takes to the now long grass of the 
prairie, and as you pass along some of the 
trails, you will see, every little while, the 
scurrying of the mother and her brood 
from the roadway, where they have been 
sunning and " dusting " themselves. They 
feed on grasshoppers, crickets, beetles and 
seeds, relishing the first named and con- 
suming untold quantities of them. 

As a game bird, the sharp-tail fur- 
nishes grand sport. Especially are they ap- 



preciated by lazy men, who prefer to shoot 
them from a buggy, or wagon, with dogs 
trained to range close, and to retrieve the 
game when brought down. Many interest- 
ing articles have been written, and many 
more could be, showing the possibilities of 
man's enjoyment when in pursuit of that 
which he finally bags, after meeting it on 
its own domain; but such would not come 
within the limitations or province of this 
paper. 

As the winter approaches, the birds take 
to the thickets, on the borders of lakes and 
rivers, and may then be found perched on 
trees; obtaining their food from the buds 
of the willows and aspens. 

Dissection of the crop and stomach, at 
this time, often reveals the buds in an ad- 
vanced stage of growth, having the soft 
fleecy down, known to boys as " pussy 
cats." I have often taken twigs from the 
crop i$4 inches in length; also a dark 
round berry, the name of which I have not 
been able to learn. 

Let anyone look at the feet and toes of 
this species, and observe how Nature pro- 
vides for all — each according to its needs. 
The legs are heavily furred, the coat en- 
veloping the entire feet, and the under side 
of the toes are scaled, with hard sharp 
plates or laminae, which prevent the soles 
from being cut by the frozen snow. These 
also aid the bird in its search after what 
ground food is procurable, during the long 
severe winters which it experiences. 

It is said to burrow under the deep snow, 
when frightened, and even to sleep there; 
but I cannot get this authenticated. I know 
it flounders through the light fleecy crys- 
tals, which are characteristic of its home, 
often passing underneath for a yard or so, 
but this cannot consistently be called bur- 
rowing. 



A NIGHT'S BASS FISHING. 



F. L. DAVIS. 



The proposal to spend a night on the 
shore of the Potomac, above Washington, 
was first made by Chic. He dwelt with 
enthusiasm on the hunger of bass at the 
darkest hours, and of their known fondness 
for any kind of bait, provided it was sup- 
plied after nightfall. Will at once jumped 
at the idea; anything promising sport 
suited him. I was a little cautious and, 
while willing to go, was doubtful of the 
wisdom of spending a night on a river 
bank. However, we decided to go, and 
agreed to meet at 7 o'clock, the next even- 
ing. 



At the appointed time Chic came with 3 
blankets, strapped around his shoulders; 
Will brought 2 tin buckets, a liberal allow- 
ance of lunch and fishing tackle; while I 
furnished more lunch, another supply of 
tackle, and a hammock. 

A trolley car from Georgetown, and a 
transfer beyond Tennallytown, to another 
trolley, took us to a point on the upper 
Potomac, near old Cabin John Bridge and 
the Chataugua, which we reached before 
midnight. There was hardly moon enough 
to light the way and soon Chic confessed 
he was slightly turned around and did not 



i86 



RECREA TION. 



know where that good spot was, in which 
he before cast his line at night. We were 
out for fishing and did not care much where 
we found it. The whole upper Potomac, 
above Georgetown, is fishing ground, and 
when fish are biting, good-sized fellows 
can be landed from any of the holes along 
the banks. 

After much knocking about in the dark, 
we at last settled on the Virginia shore, 
near the chain bridge. The night had 
grown cold and we were anything but com- 
fortable. We threw the blankets over our 
shoulders and waited for bites that did not 
come. Opinions of Chic, and his ideas of 
sport were expressed, and after a half-hour 
in this spot camp was moved. 

To warm up the situation, and with the 
idea a fire might attract the fish, we gath- 
ered dry twigs, and started a blaze. Still 
no fish, but something else was attracted 
by the fire. Within 10 minutes, the river 
and woods seemed to sprout men. At least 
a dozen came straggling up to the fire, one 
by one, to know the reason of the blaze. 
Their curiosity excited ours. Where had 
they come from and what were they doing? 
Will whispered into my ear, " Herring 
poachers. They take us for constables — 
let 'em think so." 

Several of the visitors asked questions, 
as to our purpose. Where were we from 
and where going? One man, who came in 
a skiff, was particularly anxious to find out 
something about us. Acting on Will's sug- 
gestion, we let him think we were deputy 
sheriffs looking for herring thieves. 

" Have you seen any to-night? " was 
asked of the skiff man. 

" Ain't seen none 'tall t'-night," he re- 
plied. " Don't believe trier's goin' t' be 
any round; though they most allers can 
be found right yer at this time o' night. 
Reckon they must o' thought you fellers 
was a-comin' and done give th' slip. 
They's purty sly." The old rascal was 
right. They were a sly set and he was 
probably one of the slyest. His uneasiness 
at having officers near, however, was poor- 
ly concealed under his bluff. 

We were glad he had come out of the 
woods, for anything was a diversion, when 
the bass would not notice the minnows 
squirming on our hooks. I went to ex- 
amine the lines, which had been left out 
during the visit of the prowlers, and found 
2 perch on the outside of as many min- 
nows. Going back to the fire, I noticed 
Will examining a revolver, which he put 
into his pocket. 

"What's that for?" I asked. 

" There's going to be trouble to-night. 
If we stay here those fellows will be so 
hopping mad at losing a night's catch, 
they'll be up to any kind of mischief. If we 
leave at this stage of the game, they'll be 



so suspicious they'll give us trouble any- 
way. That last fellow had mischief in his 
eye." 

It was rather uncomfortable on the 
rocks, with a bright fire to show us in bold 
relief against the darkness surrounding us, 
in which were concealed at least 10 men 
who made their livings by violation of the 
laws they thought we were there to defend. 
The whole blackness seemed pierced with 
eyes. 

We continued to watch the lines and to 
grumble at our luck. Nothing but perch 
came our way, and they were hardly larger 
than the bait they swallowed. Chic de- 
clared this was not the spot he started out 
to find, for there the buckets would have 
been filled with bass. " And no poachers," 
I murmured. 

As the morning wore on, nothing was 
seen of the men, but Will remained against 
the rock, where he posted himself after 
placing the revolver in his pocket. I was 
about to suggest getting ready to move by 
daylight, when we were startled by the re- 
port of a pistol-shot. It seemed to have 
come from above. I looked toward the 
bridge and instantly heard a rapid succes- 
sion of shots. By the flashes I saw a hack 
crossing the bridge. The shots were being 
fired by a drunken man, who had more 
pistols than the law allowed. I was about 
to rise from behind a rock, where I had in- 
stinctivelly jumped, when the firing rang 
out again. At the same time I was startled 
by 2 reports behind me, and as I turned 
and ran to Will, a curse, followed by the 
splashing of paddles in the water, told that 
somebody had been hurt and was moving 
off. 

"What's the matter, Will?" I excitedly 
shouted. "Who's hurt?" 

" Both of us," and he held up his right 
arm, from which the blood was flowing. 

Chic was with us instantly. Seizing the 
revolver he emptied the remaining cham- 
bers down the river, in the direction he 
supposed the departing poacher had taken. 
A derisive yell came across the water. Our 
inquisitive visitor had safely crossed the 
river; how badly he was hurt, we never 
discovered. 

We turned our attention to Will. Not 
much harm was done. The bullet had 
passed through the fleshy part of his arm, 
just beneath the elbow. The affair put a 
dampener on our already disappointing 
night's experience, and preparations were 
at once made for moving. A milk-wagon 
carried us home, where we arrived tired 
and disgusted, determined never again to 
fish after nightfall, unless there should be 
a house at hand, where rest and warmth 
could be had, and where poachers and men 
on drunken orgies could not interfere with 
or frighten us. 



QUAIL IN WINTER. 

A. JESSUP. 



The most trying season of the year for 
" Bob White " is in midwinter, when there 
is heavy snow. If a thick, icy crust forms, 
every covey in the region will sometimes 
be caught beneath it and frozen to death. 
At this time the flesh of the quail is dark 
and bitter, from feeding on laurel shrubs 
and evergreens. The birds become very 
tame in severe weather, and will visit farm- 
houses and barnyards in search of food. 
No true sportsman kills them in such con- 
dition, but the pot hunter, who rarely at- 
tempts to shoot them on the wing, is too 
apt to get out his old musket and deal 
slaughter among the defenceless creatures. 
If he finds them in their favorite position, 
huddled up, heads together, in a small ex- 
cavation in the snow, a single well — or 
rather ill — aimed shot' will kill or maim 
most of them, leaving the remainder to 
scatter and be frozen. 

In the sportsman's code there is no 
crime so heinous as shooting a quail before 
it has taken wing. You may claim that 
every bird your companion shoots has 
fallen to your gun, thereby making yourself 
very unpleasant, and still be able to live it 
down, and become an honorable man. 
You may even take the shot, when a single 
bird has flown across another man's ter- 
ritory, and be reluctantly excused on the 
ground of excitement and inadvertence. 
But the sporting reputation of the man 
who will fire at a bird sitting on the 
ground, where a child could hit it, is irre- 
trievably and deservedly blasted, and bur- 
ied without benefit of clergy. 

Not that the chance often offers itself for 
such disgrace; for there is nothing more 
remarkable about the quail, than the al- 
most incredible faculty nature has be- 
stowed upon it of becoming invisible, in 
a way that suggests magic. So exactly do 
the cream and gray and brown of the 
bird's markings harmonize with the sur- 
rounding colors of its haunts, that one may 
stand within a yard of a covey, in compara- 
tively open ground, and be unable to dis- 
tinguish their dusky, crouching forms. A 
hunter could give numberless instances of 
this faculty which would seem incredible 
to those who have not an intimate ac- 
quaintance with the birds. 

The only man I ever saw who could see 
coveys that the dogs were pointing, was a 
laconic, eagle-eyed, red-haired pot hunter, 
in the Pennsylvania mountains. After the 



manner of his cult, he hunted in any way 
that would take most meat to market, and 
always tried for a sitting shot with the first 
barrel, except when we were along to 
taboo the practice. His dog was exceed- 
ingly steady and patient in standing game, 
and old Roger would peer carefully until 
he caught sight of the black and white 
stripings on the necks and heads of the 
brightly plumaged cock-birds. Then the 
wretch would back off to shooting distance 
and send in his murderous shot. 

Owing to such vandalism, increasing 
each year as the markets offer higher in- 
ducements to the professional gunner, the 
call of the quail is becoming rarer in many 
districts where they formerly abounded. 
There is some saving tendency in the game 
associations that are being formed through 
the country, especially in New York and 
Connecticut, for the enforcement of the 
laws. 

The people who have sufficient inter- 
est in the subject to take active part in 
the work reside, however, in places where 
the birds are already hopelessly thinned 
out. Moreover, they can do nothing with 
the pot hunter, who hunts on Sunday in 
the depths of the woods, and who generally 
has more or less local sentiment in his 
favor. 

When quail shooting is conducted in a 
sportsmanlike manner, it aids in the pres- 
ervation of the birds. Hawks, foxes, and 
other of their deadly enemies are kept 
down by the hunters, and killing a half- 
dozen quails from a flock will not exter- 
minate it, as the bird is very prolific. In 
some spots, remote from markets, the gen- 
tlemen of the region have shot constantly 
for over half a century, yet the birds are 
actually increasing. 

The " using-grounds " of the coveys are 
generally known by the farmer who is fond 
of shooting, and in winter he scatters 
" tailings " — a poor quality of wheat — 
where the starving quail can find it. 

In the last hard winter I struck up an 
acquaintance, through this means, with 2 
coveys on a bleak Maryland hillside. It 
was really a hard matter for me to hunt 
that ground the next autumn, though they 
were again invisible, and as wild as deer, 
until another gunner began to cut into 
them; then I felt that patience had ceased 
to be # a virtue, and with some pangs of 
conscience followed his example. 



187 



THE BEAR STORY OUR VISITOR TOLD. 



E. L. KELLOGG. 



Far up toward the headwaters of the 
Methow, in the rough country of the Cas- 
cades, we made our camp. Our first week 
of tramping over mountains and through 
streams, had completely fagged us; so 
when Sunday came we settled down in the 
shade of the stunted firs to smoke and rest. 
Being out of the range of settlement we 
had not seen even a prospector. You can 
imagine then our surprise at seeing a man 
in greasy buckskins, coming over a ridge 
to the West of us. Apparently he was 
making for camp and as he drew near we 
struggled to our feet to greet him. 

" Mornin', boys, havin' a good time? " 
he inquired genially. " I heerd your shoot- 
in' an' knowed somebody was campin' 
down the canyon. I live 'bout 6 miles up 
the Methow," he continued to explain. 
" Been here 17 year, an' make it a point to 
visit all comers in this section. My busi- 
ness, did you ask? Huntin' and trappin'. 
No I hain't got a pardner — only a wife." 

Subsequently he told us his name was 
" Smoky " Tunnison, and his wife was a 
squaw. 

Smoky tilted his dirty, wide-brimmed 
hat to one side and ran his fingers through 
his hair in a meditative way. 

" Hain't any licker in camp is thar? " he 
asked presently. " You see I've been hav- 
in' another tetch of ondigestion, for the last 
week, and thar hain't a thing 'bout the 
cabin what's good fer it." 

Half emptying a pint bottle of Western 
whiskey, handed to him, he returned it with 
a sigh and borrowing a pipeful of tobacco 
settled down. 

" Got a couple of bar I see," he observed, 
noting the skins of 2 black bears tacked to 
near-by tree trunks. 

" Yes," replied Dick, " we killed them 
on the burnt mountain, over there to the 
Southwest." 

Smoky, in his shrewd, frontier way must 
have noticed the please-don't-mention- 
such-trifles manner in which Dick spoke, 
and our efforts to keep down our pride at 
our record, for he remarked dryly: 

" Bars is pleantiful hereabouts, but they 
don't 'mount to nothin'. Thar's no more 
fight in a black bar than in a jack rabbit. 
I kill 'em for their hides, but it's most like 
shootin' hogs. 

" Now the grizzly's the feller you wants 
to look out fer. Them bars o' yourn re- 
minds me of a experience I had with one, 
onct. An' it was that experience," he 
mused pensively, as he cast longing eyes 
toward the bottle, " what made me a 
chronic ondigestionist." s 

" Let us hear the story," said one of the 



boys, taking the hint and again passing the 
bottle. 

" It happened back in the 6o's, when I 
was a Mormon an' had a ranch of my own, 
an' a few hed o' cattle, off to the East of 
Salt Lake. Grizzlies was thick thereabouts 
then. It were a reg'lar thing to see 'em in 
droves of 4 to a dozen. I hunted 'em 
some, along at first; but I only had an old 
Missouri Yager; an' after bein' treed onct 
or twict I kinder soured on the sport. 
One day^ though, I bought an army muskit 
— one o' them britch-loaders, where the 
britch flops out to one side an' you push 
in a catridge an' flop her back agin. It 
shot a bullet the size of a robin's egg, an' 
had a bay'nit. It were the bay'nit what give 
me my idee on bar huntin', an' led to this 
experience I'm tellin' of. 

" The first chance I got I went off to try 
my idee on a grizzly — an' while I'm think- 
in' of it let me advise you, boys, don't get 
idees about huntin'. An idee will give you 
as much trouble as a breachy mule. 

" Wal to get back to the story; I knowed 
a canyon where bars was pleanty. Thar 
was scatterin' bunches o' brush along the 
sides an' bottom, whar the bars liked to 
lay 'round an' loaf. I pushed up this can- 
yon 'bout half a mile when I heerd a rust- 
lin' in the brush an' out stepped Mr. .Griz- 
zly, side on, less'n 3 rods away, a swingin' 
his head from side to side, and sniffm' the 
air. 

" I up an' fired an' hit him — not in the 
shoulder as I had figgered on, but jist back 
of the short ribs; an' I knowed I hadn't 
stopped him. You see, I was used to usin' 
my old Yager that's as gentle on the trig- 
ger as ken be; so when I pulled the mus- 
kit, that's as hard mouthed as a mule, she 
swung way round to geeward, an' I missed. 

" Wal I knowed the bar was hit, from 
the way he whined an' nipped his sides, an* 
bein' curous to see him wilt when the can- 
non ball finished its work I stood thar 
a-gawpin' at his antics. By the time I 
come to my senses enough to flop open the 
britch an' begin reloadin', the bar was 
a-comin' fer me red eyed, an' I had to 
stand an' face 'im. 

" When he got 'bout 10 feet from me he 
riz up an' come ahead, with his paws 
reached out an' his mouth open. Then I 
lunged, an' the bay'nit jabbed him full 
length jest under his wishbone. An' thar's 
where my idee got out of kilter. You see, 
with a catridge in the gun and the bay'nit 
in his breast I could have blowed Mr. 
Grizzly hell-west in no time; but the 
catridge wasn't thar, so I had to handle 
him the best I could. 



188 



WILD TURKEYS IN THE SUNK LANDS. 



189 



" When I struck him he roared an' tried 
to reach me; but I pushed hard on the bay'- 
nit an' held him off. He could out-push 
me an' back me about right smart; but he 
couldn't reach me; an', seein' this plan 
wouldn't work he hauled off an' hit the 
muskit a bat with his paw that nearly lifted 
me off'n my pins. But I held on, for I 
knowed it was my only salvation. Then 
he tried to come down onto all fours; but 
I pried up on the butt, an' he riz again. 

" Then he begun his pushin' tactics agin; 
an' his steady pushin' give me a chance to 
use one hand a little as I had the butt o' 
the muskit agin the pit of my stomick. 
By an' by I managed to shove a catridge 
home jest as I was gettin' tuckered out, an' 
then I closed the britch. All this time 
I was a-hoppin' an' pushin' an' tusslin' 
'round, an' the bar was a-shovin' an' the 2 
of us a-goin' it fer all thar was in us. Gee! 
but didn't I feel good when the britch 
snapped shet. Talk 'bout the feelin's of a 
feller that's bein' hung, when the rope 
breaks! That don't describe it! 

" I pulled the trigger and then Well, 



when I come to, I seemed to be a-dreamin'; 
an' I wondered how big a hole the bullet 
made in me when the bar pulled the trig- 
ger; an' I kind o' went feelin' round to see 
if I could find where it went in. The bar 
was dead enough though, with a hole in 
him big enough to stick my leg into; an' 
from the shakin' up I got it seemed to me 
I was putty near as dead as Mr. Grizzly. 

" The main trouble with my idee was 
jist this: I'd figgered on what the old 
muskit would do to the grizzly at the front 
end, but I hadn't calklated on how she'd 
treat me behind; an' when she went off, 
instead of bustin' like some guns might, 
she jist bored the bar an' kicked me silly. 
Why the kick she give me completely up- 
sot my digestive organs; an' they've never 
been right sence. But what I can't under- 
stand," CQncluded Smoky, innocently, " is 
that whenever I recall the story I have a 
nuther twinge of ondigestion." 

There was a moment's silence, then a 
low murmured " Thanks." Then the gen- 
tle gurgling of Smoky's panacea and in a 
few minutes he walked away. 



WILD TURKEYS IN THE SUNK LANDS. 



JOHN W. PRATHER. 



In the region of Reelfoot lake, in West- 
ern Tennessee, once the hunting ground of 
Davy Crockett, low ridges covered by a 
dense growth of cane, alternate with hol- 
lows filled with cypress. Yearly covered 
by the overflow from the Mississippi, this 
bottom land is fertile as the valley of the 
Nile; and in its tangled cover, wild turkeys 
can yet be found. 

In early spring, some years ago, my 
friend, Ben, and I, started on horseback 
from our homes. A few hours' leisurely 
ride brought us to Carpenter's Landing, 
on Reelfoot lake. Leaving our horses, and 
obtaining a canoe, we crossed the lake, 
and, choosing a suitable spot on a cane 
ridge, were soon ready to camp. 

Ben built a fire, and cooked 4 young 
squirrels we had shot, while I cut stakes 
and poles, and constructed a shelter for the 
night. A few bundles of switch cane served 
for a roof; and more, laid on the ground, 
and covered by gum-cloth, made a com- 
fortable bed. When supper was ready, we 
were also ready. The savory odor of 
broiled squirrel and hot, black coffee, stim- 
ulated our appetite, and we soon cleared 
the platter. 

Ben produced a bottle labelled " For 
medical purp's only." He proposed, 
though we are not physicians, that we 
should sample its contents; which he 



highly recommended as an antidote for 
snake-bite. Knowing there were moc- 
casins in the vicinity, he thought it only 
prudent that we be forearmed as well as 
forewarned. Ben is a very prudent man, 
and always ready for snakes, though he 
seldom sees them. He is something of a 
philosopher, is Ben, a great hunter, and 
good cook. At home he suffers from " that 
tired feeling; " but in the woods — lucky in- 
deed is the turkey, or deer, that escapes 
his rifle. 

At 5 o'clock next morning we had break- 
fasted, put the camp in order, oiled and re- 
charged our guns, and were ready to start 
a-field. A short tramp brought us to a 
cypress brake, through which we stole 
noiselessly. The first rays of the sun were 
gilding the tops of the evergreens when we 
heard — " gee-oble-goble-oble " — a gob- 
bler's salute to the morning. The bird was 
evidently wide awake, and quite near us, 
possibly within 1,000 yards, and we sought 
cover cautiously and quickly. 

Ben took position in a tree-top, well 
situated in a place where the cane was not 
too high, nor too thickly grown. I hid 
in a bunch of short, thick cane, about 60 
feet away. We felt confident of success; 
understanding thoroughly our game, and 
grounds, and what was of equal moment 
just then, each other. 



rgo 



RECREA TION. 



Ben, in the tree-top, called with a turkey- 
bone " yaup — yaup — yaup — yaup." " Gee- 
oble-goble-oble," answered the gobbler. 
More calls on .the bone, the turkey re- 
plying several times, at short intervals. 
After a few moments of silence, there came 
a sudden rush of strong wings beating the 
air, a swish, as the bird alights, under cover 
of heavy cane 200 yards away. Brer' tur- 
key was for a short time very quiet; but 
presently we heard a booming sound as of 
distant thunder. He was strutting. 

Ben again called several times. The gob- 
bler answered, and slowly advanced, his 
head looking like a blossoming snowball 
as we caught glimpses of it through the 
dark foliage. Very warily he managed that 
advance, stopping to make observations, 
then moving cautiously forward, he circled 
the tree-top in which Ben was concealed. 
A moment longer, and the crack of Ben's 
rifle, followed by convulsive beating of 
wings on the ground, announced that the 
turkey was ours. He proved a fine, large 
bird, weighing, when dressed, 21 y 2 pounds. 

Swinging our prize to a tree-branch, we 
went in search of more game toward the 
higher ridges, where the hens nest. Wad- 
ing through water, in some places knee- 
deep, we came at last to a ridge from which 
we could hear the " yaup-yaup " of a turkey 
hen, quickly followed by the gobble of a 
cock. Halting to get the range and dis- 
tance of the birds, we soon discovered 
there were several hens and more than one 
gobbler in the bunch. 

We crossed the ridge diagonally until 
we came to a depression in the ground, 
some 300 yards in length. Here the cane 
was short and sparse, and intermingled 
with hackberry trees. Abundance of fresh 



sign beneath the trees, showed that turkeys 
were accustomed to feed there, and we 
took positions near, well hidden by logs 
and brush. 

It is difficult to decoy a cock turkey 
from the company of hens, and requires 
most artistic work, on the call. Ben rose 
to the occasion. After a duet of turkey 
music lasting half an hour, between the call 
and the birds, a gobbler stepped out from 
the cover, 200 yards away. With lowered 
head and front, he came forward a few 
paces, stopped, and straightening himself 
to his full height of nearly 5 feet, surveyed 
the surroundings. They did not seem to 
suit him exactly, and he returned to the 
cover. Ben continued his performance on 
the call, varied with an occasional rake on 
the ground, in imitation of a turkey's 
scratching. 

In a short time the gobbler again 
emerged from the thick cane, 50 yards 
nearer than before. Erect, with eye and 
ear alert, he came slowly across the flat. 
The slightest sound or motion, from our 
hiding place, would have sent him flying 
to cover. When within 40 paces — so near 
that I could see him draw the delicate 
bluish-white membrane over his eye-balls 
to clear their surface — I pressed the trigger 
of my little 16 gauge Parker. A spasmodic 
bound into the air, and the bird fell dead, 
with 20 pellets of No. 7 shot in his head 
and neck. 

Returning over our route, and shooting 
a mess of squirrels, we were soon enjoying 
a hearty meal at camp. An easy pull of 5 
miles across the lake, and a ride of 3 hours 
in the saddle, brought us to our homes; 
well satisfied with ourselves, and our good 
fortune. 



AN ELK HUNT. 

J. B. JENNETT (OLD SILVER TIP). 



We were in Wyoming, on the headwaters 
of Big Sandy, up by the Lamereaux Mead- 
ows. It is a nasty piece of country; full of 
old dead falls, branches and.swamps. If the 
weather is any way dry it is almost impos- 
sible to " still " hunt in there. In the creek, 
you could see trout, in schools, swim- 
ming around and enjoying themselves; and 
if you had hook and line it was easy to get 
a good mess. During the summer a fisher- 
man had hung up some trout, intending to 
get them on his return down the creek. 
When he came back he found Bruin had 
saved him the trouble of taking them to 
camp. He was eating them as the fisher- 
man got there and would have done the 



same for the man, only for a nice handy 
tree. Well, the bear kept the fisherman 
there for a few hours and when he got to 
camp he was in for a hunt. I was sent for, 
to make one of the party. There were 5 in 
the outfit, but none had lost a bear. The 
fisherman poured down some spirits to 
raise some other ones, and we laid him to 
rest under the pines. All the others were 
busy, so of course could not go. A few 
days after this a party came in from the 
railroad, something over 100 miles away. 
One day as I was going toward the creek 
I jumped 8 elk. Then I made my rounds 
through the woods, and came back to 
camp. I went over to the visitors and got 



GOD'S LANGUAGE. 



191 



2 of them to come with me. One was 
armed with a 40-82-260 Winchester re- 
peater. The other had a 44-40, of the same 
make, and I had a 45-90-300. 

They mounted their horses and over 
we went. They were to go around and 
station themselves in the swamp, on the 
other side, while I went through the patch 
of timber. I had no faith in one of the men, 
as he would lose his head, and the other 
didn't appear to have any. When I entered 
the timber I smiled to think that if they 
met " Old Ephraim," they would break 
their necks to get out of there. Everything 
was as quiet as nature could make it. I 
hadn't got much more than well tangled 
up in the fallen timber when " bang! bang! 
bang! " and such a banging! I stood still; 
I almost felt that Indians were at us. I 
never thought 2 men could kick up such 
a row. The woods seemed full of them. 
I was doing the best I could to get 
around to them; but it was impossible to 
make any headway in that mass of fallen 
timber. Still that banging kept up. I ex- 
pected when I got to them to find enough 
meat to last all winter. What a sight! Two 
horses feeding quietly; one man hat in 
hand and tearing around as if a swarm of 
bees were after him, yelling all the time, 

" I hit him! I hit him! I saw him stag- 



ger!" 1 was staggered. The other might 
have been taken for a parson on his 
" bended marrow bones," a position I am 
sure was new to this man. You see what 
even the dumb animals can do. I am sorry 
to say he wasn't struck with religion, he 
was struck with a desire to find blood. He 
was only doing what the good book says, 
" Seek and ye shall find." Seek as hard as 
we could we could find no blood. I then 
asked, " How many shots did you fire? " 
They had fired one magazine of 44's and 2 
of 40-82's and nothing down. Who gets 
the buck fever? It was point blank range, 
in a swamp, not a twig or bush in the way, 
clear, open ground. Then one of these 
buck fevered men got on his horse and 
went to camp for more ammunition to 
hunt elk that must have been at least 2 
miles up in the hills. 

Verily one meets with some queer things 
in the woods. Where he showed me he 
had hit the bull, I found a drop of blood, 
and following it up found the bull dead 
enough behind a rock, and cut his throat. 
There were no more signs of blood, though 
we hunted the wood for a mile around. 
Talk about a battlefield. You should have 
seen that pile of shells. I believe it was 
just by the merest chance that the bull was 
hit. 



GOD'S LANGUAGE. 



EDWARD G. ALLANSON. 



I've climbed the Sierra Madres — 
I've seen the big horn's leap — 
I've fought the mighty silver-tip 
In canyons wild and deep. 

I've gone to rest at evening, 

In lonely silent glens, 

Where dark pines lift their towering crests, 

And gray wolves seek their dens. 

Where light the perfumed zephyrs 
Cool on my brow would play, 
Until the sun came up at morn 
And chased the dawn away. 

The tall firs towered above me; 
I hear them whispering still; 
I see the velvet lawn beneath 
Laced with the mountain rill. 

The grandeur of those grand old hills, 
How infinite — how sublime! 
'Tis God's own language to the soul — 
The impress of the Divine! 



THE ALASKA PENINSULA. 



L. BALES. 



The Alaska peninsula is 300 miles long; 
breaking up at Unimak island into the 
Aleutian archipelago, which extends 500 
miles further to the South and West. It is 
160 miles in width from Cook inlet, on the 
Pacific side, to Bristol bay on Bering sea. 
At the Iliamna lake portage — the Northern 
end of the peninsula — there is some birch 
and black alder, and plenty of spruce tim- 
ber along the larger streams. As you pro- 
ceed Southward, however, the trees soon 
disappear, and the hills and mountains are 
covered to the snow line with moss and 
grass only. 

In June of last year I was one of a party 
of 4 that went to the Iliamna lake country 
on a trading expedition. From tidewater 
on the Pacific, it is 20 miles to the first vil- 
lage; over an open country for 12 miles, 
then through scattering spruce from there 
to the lake. The village stands on a gently 
rising slope on the North side of a beauti- 
ful river, 4 miles from the lake. It consists 
of about 25 substantial log houses, a store 
and a church. The place is run in the in- 
terest of the A. C. Co. by 4 brothers. They 
are half-breeds; their father being a Rus- 
sian sea captain, and their mother a Kenai 
Indian woman, of Cook inlet. The elder 
brother, a large corpulent man, is the head 
chief, and his word is law, even to the im- 
posing of a death penalty. Paul, the 
youngest brother, is sub-chief, and also act- 
ing priest of the Greek Catholic church. 
The chief receives $50 a month in cash, and 
$15 worth of goods; while Paul gets about 
*/2 as much. Another brother spends the 
summer on the beach, hunting; and in 
guarding the Co's. cache, where supplies 
for the village are stored. 

The fourth brother camps on the lake 
shore, at the mouth of the river. His busi- 
ness is to watch for the coming of native 
trading parties, and announce their ap- 
proach to the chief, that preparations may 
be made to receive them. A home-made 
liquor, called hoochinoo, brewed from 
graham flour, sugar, etc., is brought out, 
and all hands." gin up." By the time the 
traders arrive at the village, singing and 
dancing are in progress. The visitors hold 
out for a while, but at last join in the fes- 
tivities, and consume their share of hoochi- 
noo. Gambling is then added to the other 
amusements, and the orgies continue from 
one to 4 weeks; or until the visitors have 
lost all their furs. Then they return to 
their homes, with a few goods bought on 
credit; the value of which, will be deducted 
from that of their next year's catch. 

When white traders arrive, tents are set up 
for them, and they are supplied with wood 



and water. If a carouse cannot be started 
by the natives, then trading begins, and 
lasts until their furs and money are gone; 
or until the trader's supplies give out. 
The Indians have plenty of money, and 
drive shrewd bargains; yet are honest and 
trustful. They allowed me to set the price 
on my goods, and weigh them out; and 
would then hand me their money boxes, 
from which I could pay myself. 

Iliamna lake is a fine body of water, 90 
miles in length and 40 miles in width, and 
clear as crystal. At the Eastern end are 
numerous rocky islets, which, in summer, 
are covered with eggs of gulls and other 
wild fowl. Plenty of land otters and minks 
are found about those islets, and there, is 
the only place I have seen the spotted or 
fresh-water seal. The lake is full of salmon, 
trout, and other varieties of fish; among 
them, a peculiar fish weighing 2 to 5 
pounds, with a bill like a duck's. Many 
kinds of wild fowl resort to the region. Oc- 
casionally, in summer, terrible wind storms 
visit the lake, sometimes carrying gravel 
from the beach 50 yards inland. There are 
5 small villages on this lake. 

North of Iliamna, and connected with it, 
by a river 6 miles long, is Clark lake or- 
Kechick Ozra, 100 miles in length. On it 
are 3 villages; one at the falls on the outlet, 
one at the North end, and one half way be- 
tween. There are a few barren ground 
caribou and mountain sheep found around 
this lake; also, black and cinnamon bears, 
wolves, foxes and snowshoe rabbits. 
Farther to the North, on the head waters 
of the Kuskokwin river, is a great beaver 
country. 

The Aleuts, along the seashores, manu- 
facture many valuable curios from walrus 
tusks; spending one to 3 years in making 
an article, and then selling it for a trifle. 
They are self-supporting, and make cloth- 
ing from salmon, bird and animal skins, 
that is well adapted to the climate in which 
they live. Since the white traders came 
among them, they are sometimes careless 
of the future. Two years ago, they failed 
to put up enough salmon to last until the 
following season, and as a result, were 
obliged to eat all their sled dogs, of which 
they had many. 

The Aleuts seem all to be more or less 
affected with lung troubles, though they 
live in comfortable, well heated houses. An 
old chief pointed out to me, many newly 
made graves, and said, " My babies, plenty 
sleep." For all ills they resort to the sweat 
lodge and the cold plunge. 

A chief exacts a toll from his own tribe, 
of everything obtained in the chase or 



192 



THE BIPED SWINE. 



i93 



otherwise. They use the Russian jargon, 
as well as their mother tongue. On near- 
ing a village or camp, one can usually hear 
the weird chant — " Ah ha! ah ha! ah haka 
ah ha! " with which the natives accompany 
all their gambling games. This they sing 
with a peculiar shrugging of their should- 
ers, and swaying of their bodies. In gam- 
bling they choose sides; an equal number 
of players on each. Then any articles they 
may have are put up against others of 
about the same value; say, a pipe against 
a knife, or a handkerchief against a comb. 
All articles staked are thrown in a heap, 
and the game begins. It is played with 2 
pieces of ivory, or bone, about 2 inches 
long. These are round and tapering, from 
the middle to the ends, and one is marked 
with black. A player takes these bits of 
ivory, and after rolling them in his hands a 
while, puts his hands behind his back. The 
opposite side then guesses which hand the 
marked ivory is in. Before the players is a 
pile of small sticks, one for each persoa 
and at each guess a stick is removed from 



the pile. When all are gone, the success- 
ful players take the articles put up against 
their own. 

There has been but little placer gold 
found, as yet, in this part of Alaska. There 
are many ledges of micaceous quartz con- 
taining iron pyrites, which may, or may not 
prove valuable. Cinnamon bears are quite 
numerous, and their trails can be seen in 
many places. Each of these trails seems to 
be 2, 12 to 24 inches apart; yet both are 
made by one bear. They always step in 
the same tracks, making great holes in the 
moss and muck. While our goods were 
being packed to the village, by the natives, 
I unexpectedly ran on a medium sized cin- 
namon. He sat up on his haunches, and in 
bear language said " Huh, huh, huh," 
meaning, I suppose, " Who the dickens are 
you? " Here was my chance to test my 
smokeless rifle and soft nosed bullet, at 40 
yards. As the bear went down, he struck 
a savage blow at a black alder, 6 inches in 
diameter, and broke it off as if it had been 
hit by a cannon ball. 



THE BIPED SWINE. 



s. b. m'manUs. 



In semblance.it might be a man — 
Its outward bearing and pose, 
And even shrewdest students can 
Be quite misled by its clothes, 
It walks upright, with lordly air, 
Full jaunty like and debonaire. 

But human tricks and traits are vain — 
It lacks the human manly soul, 
Save just the rudiments — a grain 
Enough to make a loathsome ghoul, 
It lives detested by all men — 
And dies — but when? No man knows 
when! 

It sits all day by pond or lake, 

Or skulks upon the river's brink, 

With ev'ry thought and aim awake 

(Such thoughts as such a thing can think) 

To make its catch a wagon load, 

To weigh it down upon the road. 



Enough is not enough for it — 
God made the fish for it alone; 
So might one judge to see it sit 
And fish until its lungs doth groan; 
In very prospect of the freight 
To carry hence — an hundred weight. 

And day by day — all seasons are, 
Alike to it. It roams the wood 
And butchers game, fair and unfair 
Each way — all ways to it are good — 
Its only thought to butcher — kill, 
Its pockets and its maw to fill. 

There was no name made for this thing, 
This hybrid something — man or ghoul — 
And nameless it went wandering 
Until some one — a long vexed soul, 
Evolved the name — most happy dog — 
And called it lo! The New Game Hog. 



Some day, sometime — when good times 

come — 
This race shall cease to be a blot — 
No not a race — this, " It " this scum 
Shall sometime be as it were not. 
And then good men will joyful laugh, 
That it but lives in photograph. 



A CAR LOAD OF DUCKS. 



J. B. A. 



It was along in November that I saw a 
flock of mallards passing over our place. 
The sight set my blood boiling, and as I 
lost them in the hazy horizon there came 
another flock. Then I knew if pard and I 
were to get any game this fall we must be 
starting for our old shooting grounds, 
commonly known as Askanana. The town 
consisted of a postofnce, barber shop, hotel 
and store, all in one building, 15 x 20 feet. 
It was named by Will Humphreys, in 
honor of an old Indian chief whom he 
had known in an earlier day. I rustled my 
pard, John Stapleton, and we set out with 
provisions for 2 weeks, for Askanana. 

John is a finely built fellow, 6 feet tall and 
weighs, in his stocking feet, 225 pounds. 
We arrived at our camp late at night and 
were out at 4 o'clock after the ducks. 

It was a cold night and ice had formed 
some 4 inches thick. 

We reached the lake at a little past 5 
and were treated to a sight I shall never 
forget. The ice was covered with ducks so 
thickly you couldn't see a particle of it. 
John went ahead, about 20 yards, and I fol- 
lowed. Our intention was to jump the 
birds and then fix our blinds for the shoot- 
ing. 

As we approached the lake, I saw the 
birds trying to rise; but they could not. 
They were all frozen fast in the ice. Again 
and again they endeavored to fly, but with- 
out success. Finally, I fired at a straggler 
that came over. At the report of my gun 
the great flock arose; and, to my surprise, 
the ice, for 20 rods about, cracked and up, 
up they went. I was close to the edge and 
jumped off, but not so with John. He was 
near the centre, and as he came back and 
looked over the edge, now some 500 feet 
above me, I waved him a farewell, expect- 



ing every moment to see the ice go to 
pieces, and John also. 

While John was going South, I returned 
home with a sad heart; notified the neigh- 
bors, and preparations were at once made 
to hold a corpseless funeral. The next day 
we were all astonished by receiving the fol- 
lowing telegram: 

" Have landed all right and start for 
home to-morrow morning, with a baggage 
car full of ducks." 

This knocked us silly; but sure enough 
John showed up, in good form, and ex- 
plained. He is gifted with great presence 
of mind, and as he went South, he noticed 
the atmosphere getting warmer. After a 
few hours' ride, the ice began to melt. He 
took in the situation at a glance, and using 
his gun as a club, began to knock the ducks 
in the head. After an hour of hard labor, 
he noticed a perceptible change in the 
height of the icy cloud, and concluded he 
was then within 500 feet of the earth. 
Again he set to work, and after another 
hour was only 200 feet high, and the re- 
mainder of the ducks, whom he had not 
liberated, were nearly exhausted. 

Finally John saw a hill, about a mile 
ahead, and managed to make a landing 
thereon. Then he proceeded to kill the 
remainder of the ducks and made arrange- 
ments, at once, to ship them to market. 
He took out a pocket map, looked at the 
sun, and found he was in Northern Loui- 
siana. He shipped his birds to Chicago 
and they netted him the snug sum of $500. 

It was a great adventure, and one John 
does not care to repeat. His hair was nice 
and black when he went out that morning, 
but is now a bright red, owing probably to 
his close proximity to the sun, during a 
portion of his flight. 



THE COAL MONOPOLISTS. 

In the bitter winter weather, 

When the homes of the poor are cold 
They put their heads together 

To add to their pile of gold; 
And the price of coal goes higher, 

That before was much too high — 
Well, they will not lack for fire 

In the land of the by and by. 

/ — Boston Courier. 



194 



HE GOT THE COON. 



ADELLA WASHER. 



The rain had begun early in the morning 
and there had been a steady downpour all 
day. 

The Rev. Mr. Hamlin, in his study, 
put the finishing touches to his sermon; 
thought of the little white church several 
miles away, where he had promised to 
preach the next day, looked down the 
muddy country road, and hoped the storm 
would stop before morning. It was still 
raining when he went to bed, but the next 
morning broke clear and bright. Another 
look at the road, in front of the house, how- 
ever, convinced him it would be better to 
go on horseback than in the easy carriage. 

He started early, and as he rode slowly 
along, his mind divided between sermon 
and themudholes,he caught sight of a large 
coon that had been caught by the rushing 
water and lodged in a bed of drift, in the 
creek, a short distance from the road. 

The sight of that big, fat coon, fast and 
helpless, drove all thoughts of Sunday and 
sermon out of the dominie's mind, and 
brought, in their stead, a vision of white 
tents and camp fires. He remembered a 
night when the autumn wind had sighed 
softly in the tree beside his tent, and when 
the sweet strains of a darkey song had 
stolen in on the fluttering wind. He re- 
membered also that the supper that night 
had been a banquet. Sweet potatoes, roast- 
ed in the ashes, and a luscious fat coon 
baked to perfection. 

Those days and nights on Southern fields 
had taught him many things and they had 



given him a knowledge and an apprecia- 
tion of the once despised coon. 

He forgot the little white church ahead 
of him, and, unmindful of his Sunday 
clothes, he slipped from his horse, tied him 
to a tree and started into the roaring, 
storm-swept stream. 

It was not easy walking, or wading either, 
through the mud and water; but after a 
great deal of trouble and manoeuvring he 
managed to whack the coon on the head 
with a club. Then the clergyman picked 
his way back to the place where he had 
seen the visions of days forever gone. 

The coon was a beauty. So was the min- 
ister — a streaked and spotted one, not fit 
to go to church and to preach the Gospel 
to an expectant people. 

When the thought of Sunday and of the 
place he had started for came back to his 
mind, he looked at his clothes disgustedly 
and felt tempted to turn his horse around 
and go home. Then he thought how dis- 
appointed the people would be, and gave 
up the idea of fleeing like a coward. He 
hid his coon, marked the spot and went 
ahead and preached, thinking meanwhile of 
the rich repast that awaited him on his re- 
turn home. 

After service, as he passed down the 
aisle, giving pleasant greetings, right and 
left, he heard one good sister say to an- 
other: 

"Just look at Elder Hamlin! He would 
get to church and preach if he had to wade 
through mud and water up to his neck." 



OUR FIRST LOAD OF MEAT. 



E. P. JAQUES. 



Camp was pitched when Henry returned 
from Loup City with the information that 
Wes had been detained, and that we were 
to kill a load of meat and send the team 
back with it, in time to pick him up a week 
later. 

Allowing 4 days for the round trip, and 
Sunday to rest, we had 2 days in which to 
kill the game. This we decided was ample 
time and as Henry had arrived on Satur- 
day night, we made our preparations Sun- 
day, picketed our horses near the creek, 
and made an early Monday start. 

Will chose the canyons to the South and 
East of camp, keeping well to the East. 
Henry kept to the South and followed the 



creek, while I took the hilly land, away to 
the South and West. 

I travelled well into the afternoon, that 
day, without sighting even a " hoof," when, 
on toward sundown, the sharp whistle or 
snort of an old buck antelope attracted my 
attention. Nearly 150 yards beneath and 
away from me, in a wooded glen, he stood 
watching me. Quickly assuming a hori- 
zontal position — my favorite one in long 
range firing — I let drive a 56 calibre slug, 
only to raise the alkali dust beyond, show- 
ing that I had fired too high and the lead 
had passed between his horns. Away 
dashed the buck only to reappear, a few 
minutes later, around a bend in the canyon, 



195 



196 



RECREA TION. 



climbing the wall. Up he struggled out 
of range, but not out of sight, to rest at the 
summit, his graceful outlines standing in 
bold relief against the crimsoned sky. It 
was a beautiful picture, but a poor start 
toward a wagon load of meat; and after a 
shot at a skulking coyote I returned to 
camp empty handed. Will told me he had 
not seen game of any description, while 
Henry had only the shattered horn of an 
elk to show; but thereby hangs a tale. 

Henry was on his way back to camp 
when he discovered a small herd of elk (30 
he thought) on a jutting wall half way 
down the side of a canyon. If they were 
forced over it looked as if all must break 
their necks, so he made a wide detour and 
reached the pass through which they had 
descended to the plateau. Carefully look- 
ing over the lot, he selected a spike buck 
and fired; the bull at which he aimed was 
standing close to the edge, and went over 
as if struck by lightning. 

Henry was surprised to see the re- 
mainder turn, follow the lead and plunge 
over the wall, in a similar manner. It 
seemed like positive suicide and he has- 
tened to the bottom expecting to find some 
dead and others maimed; but the herd had 
vanished as if the earth had swallowed 
them, and so bewildered was Henry it is 
doubtful if he would have believed he had 
seen game at all had it not been for the 
freshly loosened earth at the foot of the 
wall, and the horn shot from the spike 
elk, which he picked up later on the pla- 
teau. 

The following morning Henry remained 
in camp and Will and I started up the 
creek hoping to sight Henry's elk. Keep- 
ing along its bed we sighted 3 antelope 
on a little plateau at the highest point on 
the West side. Following a canyon, to a 
point beneath the antelope we zig-zagged, 
this way and that, to gain a foothold. After 
10 minutes of hard work we found our- 
selves, breathless, in a niche just below the 
verge which gave us good footing. Here 
we paused to regain our breath, to steady 
ourselves and to prepare for action. Cau- 
tiously we raised our heads above the level 
of the plateau, with rifles at ready, but the 
antelope had winded us and vanished. We 
advanced across the level, keeping a careful 
eye in all directions, but gave up the chase 
on " striking a new lead." 

Far below, at nearly the same spot we 
occupied when we first saw the antelope, 
were 2 deer feeding. Marking the point 
where we were to rise to the bank of the 
creek and have the deer in easy range, be- 
fore starting, we dropped back into the 
canyon. Jumping from point to point, 
where footholds could be gained, and slid- 
ing long distances, ploughing the yielding 
clay with our heels we finally reached the 
bottom. 

Being effectually concealed from the 



game no caution was required; so we kept 
down the canyon to the creek, following 
the dry bed until we reached the tree we 
had marked. In this manner we came 
within 30 yards of the deer and they un- 
conscious of our presence. We fired but 
without effect, our bullets going wild, and 
as the game seemed dazed and not inclined 
to run, v/e started loading again. In the 
excitement the extractor of my Spencer 
failed to work properly and before I was 
able to slip a cartridge home Will had 
fired 3 or 4 more unsuccessful shots. By 
this time the deer were moving slowly 
away, partially hidden from view, down 
just such a deep and narrow trail as the 
editor of Recreation speaks of as " Game 
trails " in his " Hunting in the Great 
West." Only 6 inches or so of the back 
of the hindmost deer showed above the 
level, by the time I was ready for my sec- 
ond shot, and taking careful aim I fired, 
bringing him down. 

We dressed our trophy, and " laid it 
away," in the shade of an overhanging 
wall, while we went on to finish the wagon 
load of venison we were expected to kill 
that day. 

For hours we hunted through the can- 
yons, and climbed almost inaccessible 
walls without luck, but late in the after- 
noon, while travelling an extra deep and 
dark canyon, a fragment of earth came 
plunging down the wall and landed at our 
feet. We looked up and there, less than 15 
yards above, stood a black tail deer. 

Together we drew our guns to our 
shoulders, fired simultaneously and on 
either side of our game 2 jets of dust in- 
dicated where the bullets had struck. Then 
a snort to the right of us, another to the 
left and still another overhead revealed a 
whole herd of black tails. We shot with a 
rapidity we had never attempted before, 
and when the last of the herd had vanished 
and we realized what an utter failure our 
attempt to bag the game had been we stood 
silent and chagrined. But hope began 
to revive when a young buck, far up 
the opposite wall of the canyon, was sight- 
ed. Evidently he had gone as far as he 
could in that direction and there remained 
for him no alternative but to face us, and 
come back before he could escape. Quick- 
ly hurrying to a small clay mound at the 
bottom of the wall I rested my rifle on 
it. The distance between us was fully 150 
yards and taking careful aim I fired. A 
quick snort, a flashing of steam from his 
nostrils and the buck dashed down the side 
of the wall. Gradually his speed slackened, 
he staggered from side to side, and then, 
over he toppled with a 'bullet through his 
lungs. 

By this time it was well along in the 
afternoon, and after dressing our buck we 
started back toward the wall where our 
first deer lay. On the way a bunch of an- 



THE ASSOCIATED PIRATES. 



197 



telope were discovered on a hill to the 
West of us. Will was anxious for a try at 
them, so I agreed to carry the buck to the 
wall and wait for him. It was hot work 
" toting " meat and by the time I reached 
our designated meeting place I was tired. 
Placing the game side by side I waited, 
putting off hanging the carcasses to a tree 
until Will should come back and lend a 
hand. But Will failed to put in an appear- 
ance, and as it was too dark then to handle 
the game single handed I let it lay and 
started for camp. Will was there ahead of 
me. He had failed to get within range of 
his antelope and finding himself nearer 



camp than our meeting point, had turned 
that way. 

Henry, who had remained about camp 
all day, had met with more luck than we. 
In the afternoon he had " spotted " 3 deer, 
a doe and 2 fawns, coming down to the 
creek for water. He had stationed himself 
accordingly and got all 3 of them. 

Henry's venison, by the way, was all that 
comprised our " wagon load of meat " 
when we pulled out for Loup City, the next 
day; for when we went back after my deer, 
the following morning, we found only the 
scattered bones. The wolves had feasted 
on the rest. 



THE ASSOCIATED PIRATES. 
II. 



E. V. KEYSER. 



Every Friday evening last summer, a lit- 
tle Canadian canoe, with lanteen sails, used 
to run out of Spuyten Duyvil creek and 
up and across the Hudson to a point op- 
posite Riverdale. 

When within 100 yards of the shore, an 
unearthly " Wow - ow - ow - 000 " woulcl 
emanate from the canoe, to be answered 
by the same melodious screech from a fig- 
ure bending over a camp-fire, gracefully 
waving off mosquitoes with one hand and 
stirring potatoes with the other. 

Having given the spuds one last and 
loving prod, Paresis Rafferty slowly and 
majestically stalks down to the beach and 
asks, "Where's the light?" 

" Tied up in a paper," says the man in 
the boat, carefully untying a brown pack- 
age and removing an imaginary spot from 
the immaculate surface of a 6 pound driv- 
ing lantern, as he gazes fondly at it. 

Paresis appears relieved. That lamp is 
the other man's only weakness (he has 
been accused of taking it to bed with him) 
and Paresis humors him. 

" Well, Microbe, the supper's ready." 

In a very few minutes the supper is more 
than ready — it is gone. Then comes dish 
washing — but why describe it? Some use 
hot water and soap, others just hot water, 
still others use river water and sand, and 
guests at spreads of the Associated Pirates 
have learned that it is not the part of wis- 
dom to pry into the methods employed by 
them. 

Then comes a pipe, smoked on the 
end of the little wharf, while the smokers 
inhale the ozone and other things wafted 
by the Southerly breeze from the fat ren- 
dering establishment down the river. And 
after the pipe comes bed (at least that is 



what they call it) consisting of 3 blankets 
on the floor of an unoccupied shad-fisher- 
man's hut, and pleasant dreams, broken 
into by a rap on the door and an inquiry 
"Full in there?" 

" No, but willing to be," says he of the 
lamp, while the Hoboken crowd file in for 
a chat, before retiring to the hut opposite. 
They have had a hard pull up the river, 
against the tide, only to find themselves 
forestalled once more by Paresis and the 
Microbe, who have again appropriated the 
better house and most of the driftwood. 

About 8 o'clock the next morning 2 fires 
are burning brightly and 2 breakfasts are 
in course of preparation when a catboat, 
manned by a nondescript crew of hard ap- 
pearance and extremely profane speech, 
runs up to the wharf. 

The pirates having guessed their inten- 
tion some time before, have arrayed them- 
selves accordingly, and 10 disreputable 
figures are sitting on the wharf, arrayed 
in bathing suits, skull-caps and sweaters 
and carrying pistols, hatchets and bread 
knives in their belts. The scheme is a suc- 
cess. The company looks too tough even 
for the cat-boat's crew and out they go 
into the stream for some more secluded 
location. 

The joy experienced at this desertion is 
somewhat moderated by the discovery that 
on one fire the boiling kettle has over- 
turned and quenched the flames, while at 
the other the flapjacks are too burned to be 
useful, even after being sandpapered down. 

Having remedied their mishaps, and 
stowed away the provisions where they will 
do the most good, the Microbe and Pa- 
resis, being the dudes of the multitude, sail 
up the river to Yonkers for a shave, a Sun- 



io8 



RECREA TION. 



day paper and to see how the excise laws 
are enforced in that interesting hamlet. 

By some of the pirates it is insinuated 
that the chief attraction up the river is not 
the 3 given above, but the presence of 
several pairs of bright eyes, which have 
been located on previous trips. 

This suggestion is treated with the silent 
scorn it merits, and the 2 push off, to re- 
turn 4 hours later with the Sunday papers 
still unopened. Barber shops you know are 
crowded, too, on Sunday mornings. 

At dinner Paresis distinguishes himself 
by sitting down on a particularly promis- 
ing looking flapjack and is called to order 
by the others. " If he is too luxurious to 
sit on the ground why does he not invest 
in an air-cushion? " asks the man who 
cooked the jack. 

Whereupon Paresis carefully removes it 
from his knickerbockers, with his sheath- 
knife, and politely hands the cake to its 
owner with the soothing remark that, " It 
will probably taste better than it looks." 
What the owner says in reply is entirely 
out of keeping with the sacredness of the 
day; and to calm his ruffled feelings one 
of the crowd sings, 

u There are flies in the butter 
And bugs in the jam 
But as we are camping 
We don't care a — bit." 



" If you misguided individuals would 
talk less and eat more," observes Grouty, 
" there wouldn't be such an awful lot of 
truck to take back to the boat-house, and 
the janitor's family would not be as sick 
as they were last week." 

" That wasn't owing to the quantity, but 
to quality," says the Hoodoo, with his 
mouth full. " They tackled some of the 
cheese that the kerosene oil spilled on, and 
it nearly killed them." 

" I wonder if experentia will docet," 
thoughtfully inquires Paresis. 

" Experience has taught me that an ice 



barge is a good thing to tie to," says 
Grouty, " and there's a lot of them about 
2 miles up the river." 

With a rush the Hoboken crowd are 
packing up and soon their canoes are out 
in the river and waiting for the tow to 
approach. 

Being left alone Paresis and the Microbe 
also prepare to depart; waiting until the 
tide has changed so as to get through that 
abomination, the railroad bridge across the 
Spuyten Duyvil creek. The precious light 
is placed on the bow of the Microbe's 
canoe and just as the dusk falls, the camp 
is deserted for another week. 

Arriving at the boat-housej_the canoes 
are placed in the racks and the dunnage 
stowed. 

Then the Microbe makes an examination 
of the internal structure of one of Tommy's 
prehistoric piers, and Paresis wanders 
around the float, gazing in silent rapture 
at the rising moon, for he is a lover of 
nature, is Paresis — providing the fair sex 
be absent. His homage to Diana is so de- 
voted that a banana peel on the float es- 
capes his eyes but not his feet, and over the 
edge he goes, with a gentle splash, into 2 
feet of river mud. 

"You have a soft berth, Paresis," ob- 
served the Microbe, as he approaches. 
" Do you intend making a night of it? " 

Paresis looks around for a rock, but they 
have all sunk deeper in the ooze than he 
cares to dive; so the Microbe is safe, for 
the time being. 

The rescue is effected with much effort 
and a boat hook, to the detriment of 
Paresis's new knickerbockers. Then Pa- 
resis starts for home, looking so much 
like a cross between a house breaker and 
a tramp, that 2 policemen compel him to 
give an account of himself before turning 
him loose on a sleeping and helpless public. 

" As if any thief, with the ability to crack 
a meat safe, would go around looking 
thus," mutters Paresis, wrathfully, as he 
kicks his own watch dog into silence and 
shuts the hall door on its tail. 



IN MEXICO. 



ED. WILLIAMS. 



On reaching town last Sunday I received 
the August Recreation, the first copy I 
have ever seen. The only fault I find with 
it is, there is not enough of it. What strikes 
me most favorably is that in it, everybody 
has his say. Hunting is my business, 
mixed up with trading in products of the 
hunt, and, as is natural, it interests me to 
follow the hunt of the moose, elk and other 



animals of the North, in your pages. I will 
do my best to make returns for the pleasure 
received, by describing the hunt, in this lo- 
cality, of the jaguar, alligator, etc. 

This section was until lately the paradise 
of such " varments," but the egret and 
heron hunters have penetrated the inner- 
most recesses of the dismal swamps, and 
with the " boom, boom " of their shot guns 



IN MEXICO. 



199 



have driven the sly jaguar back to the 
mountains. 

From Mazatlan to San Bias the Sierra 
Madre parallels the coast, the foot hills be- 
ing 15, and in some parts, 30 miles, inland. 
The coast line is formed of long, low, nar- 
row, sandy islands, occupied by ranches; 
but the territory between the foot hills 
and coast islands, is one vast net-work of 
tide water lagoons, connected by narrow 
waterways. In the rainy season all this 
land is under water; in the dry season it 
has a height of about 18 inches above high 
water. 

This land is mud, washed from the 
mountains; the shore presents a bright 
green wall, about 20 feet high, of small 
growth mangrove. • Penetrating inland, 
ponds are found in every direction; the 
ground between strewn with dead trees, as 
a hard blow levels large tracts of this small 
growth. The margins of these ponds is 
the favorite resort of the swamp jaguar, 
where he pounces on the turtles and small 
alligators. Cranes, bitterns and snipes, are 
plentiful, and from November to March the 
large shallow lakes are alive with ducks, 
geese and snipes from the North. Here 
are seen the immense white pelicans who 
have a stretch of wings of 8 and 9 feet, in 
flocks often numbering more than 100. 

Near the shore line are scattered " coco- 
chalas " or " Colorado turkeys " as they are 
called in Arizona. 

There are 2 indigenous ducks that do not 
migrate: The " Peluleros " which are black, 
except the secondary quills of the wings 
which are white, with red warts on head 
and neck. The drakes weigh 10 to 13 
pounds. The " Pichachineis," a trim, short 
feathered duck of a dark reddish color, 
considerably smaller than a mallard, with a 
" peep, peep " note like that of a snipe. 
Both kinds are fine eating. 

Outside the swamps are found jaguar, 
tiger cat, ounce, coon, possum, " tejou " 
an animal like, but larger than the coon, 
deer, peccary, " faisain," " chichabaca," 
both pheasants, the " faisain " larger than 
a chicken, quail, 4 kinds of doves, jack-rab- 
bits and rabbits. Last but not least, for 
good meat, comes the armadillos. 

Tracks of these inhabitants of the 
" monte " are plentiful; the deer jump the 
rancher's fence and eat the young corn and 
bean plants, and the peccaries play hog 
when the corn is in the ear; but the brush 
is so thick and " joquisli " so plenty, that 
it is difficult to get a shot, or travel off the 
beaten trails. " Joquisli " is a kind of 
maguey, that grows about 4 feet high, the 
edges of the long, thick leaves lined with 
needles, and when the plants grow close 
together there is nothing to do but cut a 
way through, or go around. The deer will 
jump it and disappear in a twinkle, while 



all other animals enter by crawling close 
to the ground, and so find a safe refuge. 

A short, light rifle, or carbine, with a 
" smashing " cartridge is the best, as long 
shots are exceptional and handiness and a 
" kill 'em quick " bullet is what counts. An 
outfit for reloading with light load, and bul- 
let for small game, is good to have, as no 
wing shooting with shot gun can be done 
except on the lakes. The Savage carbine, 
fitted with Lyman's ivory hunting and re- 
ceiver sights, would fill the bill I think. 

Uncle Sam, in his " Directions to Sailing 
Masters," gives this section a bad name 
that it does not deserve. I have been here 
through 2 rainy seasons without a chill or 
a shake. When it comes to " torments " 
we have a lively list. Mosquitos are every- 
where, and all the year around. Then there 
are the gnats, small but vicious biters, which 
make it necessary to sleep under a bar of 
muslin or calico, and that is a hardship on 
account of the heat. " Jiotes " are like a 
virulent ring-worm, and start from some 
scratch or rubbed mosquito bite. They will 
cover a man from head to foot in a month 
if not killed. 

In the rainy season, June 15th to October 
15th, one returns home from a tramp in 
brush with small itching lumps on the body, 
caused by " aradofes." If there are few 
they are rubbed off with a needle, or point 
of a knife; if many, a good coat of tallow, 
well rubbed in, will stop the fun. On the 
same ground in the dry season, you will 
lay in a stock of " weners " or young ticks, 
which will make your blood circulate until 
rubbed off with a red hot rag. 

Snakes are scarce, I have killed 3 kinds 
which the Mexicans claim are poisonous, 
but found them to have no fangs; there are 
rattlesnakes but I have seen none. " Es- 
cupion " is a large lizard, sort of a Gila 
monster, but larger. The natives say the 
bite is sure death. 

A scorpion stung me in the calf of the 
leg, while in bed; thinking it did not hurt 
enough to be a scorpion, I let it go. I was 
soon undeceived by numbness of the lips, 
which had been described to me. The next 
day there was a numbness which can be 
likened to the foot being " asleep," in the 
whole body. The parts mostly affected 
were the feet, chest, throat, arms and lips. 
This was followed the second day by col- 
lapse, and I felt too weak to stand. Being 
stung lately while taking a bath, by a scor- 
pion that was on the towel, I had a chance 
to try permanganate of potassium, which I 
have for snake bites. This sting was a hard, 
straight jab in the left side, and felt like 
carbolic acid on a sore finger. I injected 
the potassium within 2 or 3 minutes after 
being stung, and felt no effect from it, ex- 
cept a slight numbness of the lips, that 
lasted about half an hour. 



A COON AND SOME YAMS. 



ELLIOT C. BROWN. 



There were 4 of us, Will, who was the 
host, Fred, Jimmy and I. We had agreed 
to have one more coon hunt before sepa- 
rating for the winter. 

We called on one of Will's neighbors 
who promised to give us some good sport 
that night. Eight o'clock found us gath- 
ered — equipped with clubs, axes and lan- 
terns — in front of our friend's house, with 
2 negroes who had volunteered their ser- 
vices and the use of their dogs. 

Mine host's friend was famous, the 
country round, for some yams he had, and 
equally famous for his stinginess. I will 
tell you what yams are, in case you have 
not had the pleasure of eating any. They 
are like the sweet potato of the North only 
5 times better. They are juicy, and as 
sweet as honey. 

This man's yams were especially fine, 
and were planted about 100 yards from 
his house; the field opening back to the 
woods. 

Being all ready, we started to the woods 
and had not gone far when the dogs gave 
tongue. What a chase they led us! Over 
logs, through bushes of all kinds, and into 
swamp after swamp. At last they treed 
the coon and we came breathlessly up and 
gathered around. 

" Abe," said one of the negroes, " go up 
an' shak' dat coon out of dat dere tree," 
and Abe went up and " shaked " and 
poked the coon with a pole Until it lost its 
grip and fell, but caught on a lower limb. 
The operation was repeated with more suc- 
cess, for the coon fell to the ground and 
was speedily dispatched by the dogs. 

The negroes now gathered wood, and a 
fire was lighted. The old negroes gave us 



some melodies and we all sang in turn, after 
which we started for home. We wandered 
around until about 1 o'clock in the morn- 
ing, when we came upon a yam field. Be- 
ing tired and hungry, we determined to' 
have a yam supper and to sleep right there. 
We did not think it worth while to try to 
find our way home that night, and sup- 
posed we were in some old nigger's yam 
field. It was our host's friend who pro- 
posed having that supper, and another fire 
was built, yams were cooked and eaten, 
and more were cooked and more were 
eaten until we could not eat another one. 
By this time we had taken about half the 
yams in the field. I noticed the niggers 
winking to one another, and throwing 
away and wasting as many as they could, 
but did not think much of it, and with the 
others was quickly wrapped in sleep be- 
side the fire. 

" Where are those d niggers? Wake 

up and see what you've done, you pigs! " 

Thus were we rudely awakened in the 
morning, by the owner of the yams. The 
light of dawn had disclosed the fact that the 
gentleman had run on his own yam field, 
and that there was only one half the crop 
left. I never saw a man so mad. The foxy 
old niggers had made good their escape 
before the discovery, doubtless taking 
home an extra bushel " fo' good luck." 
We 4 roared with laughter, which only 
made the old gentleman the hotter, so we 
followed the negroes' example and beat a 
retreat. 

That was 2 years ago, and still when we 
meet someone asks, " Had any yams late- 
ly? " and again we laugh, as we recall the 
adventure of that memorable night. 



CLIMBING MOUNTAINS ON WHEELS. 



LINCOLN M. MILLER. 



The club of mountain climbers known 
as the Mazamas, has for its object the col- 
lection of scientific data concerning the 
mountains of Washington and Oregon, and 
includes in its membership many of the 
most able men in these 2 sister states. 

It is the custom of the club to ascend 
some mountain each summer, thus adding 
to the world of science much valuable in- 
formation regarding the geological history 
of the Northwest Pacific coast. At the 
same time they enrich themselves, individ- 
ually, by that personal contact with Nature, 
and by the hard work and simple living 



which goes, according to Walt Whitman, to 
" the making of the best of people." 

The headquarters of the Mazamas are at 
Portland, Oregon. From this city, early in 
August, 1896, a party thoroughly equipped 
for work, and for recreation as well, set out 
to explore that portion of the Cascade 
range of mountains which lies between 
Douglas and Jackson counties on the West, 
and Klamath on the East. The objective 
point of the expedition was Crater lake, a 
mysterious and interesting body of water 
situated on the Eastern slope of the range, 
at an altitude of 6,280 feet. 



CLIMBING MOUNTAINS ON WHEELS. 



20t 



The exploring party numbered 42 and in- 
cluded, beside members of the club, several 
distinguished guests who had come from 
various parts of the world to join in this 
trip. 

The most feasible route, from Portland 
to Crater lake, is by way of Ashland, a town 
near the state line in the Southern part of 
Jackson county. From this point the road 
runs East across the summit of the Cas- 
cades, and then doubles back some 50 or 60 
miles along the shores of Klamath lake, 
past Mount Pitt, and Mount Scott to the 
strange volcanic basin known as Crater 
lake. 

From Portland to Ashland, a distance of 
323 miles, the journey is easily made by 
railway; but from there on it becomes 
necessary to travel by wagon or pack-train. 

In the expedition of 1896 there were 3 
Mazamas who decided to make the journey 
on wheels. 

Mr. C. H. Sholes, president of the 
Mazamas, Mr. Edgar McClure, professor 
of analytical chemistry in the University of 
Oregon, and Dr. L. Connel of Portland, 3 
enthusiastic friends of the bicycle, formed 
this detachment. 

Mr. Sholes and Dr. Connel left Portland 
by wheel and arrived in Eugene, distant 123 
miles, August 6th, where they were joined 
by Professor McClure. From here on the 
account of this expedition is taken largely 
from the latter's notes, which, for brevity 
and clearness are not easily improved upon. 
The first entry runs as follows: August 
7th left Eugene at 2.30 p.m., cyclometer 
registering 636^2. On Camas Swale, chain 
broke. Took 25 minutes to repair it. Roads 
good. Reached Cottage Grove, 22 miles 
from Eugene, at 7 p.m. Cyclometer regis- 
tered 659." 

Here the party slept in a barn. Each man 
carried a roll of blankets strapped to the 
handlebar of his wheel, and was thus pre- 
pared to " rough it " in the best sense of 
the term. 

From Cottage Grove, through Pass 
Creek Canyon and the beautiful Yoncolla 
valley, they found the roads hilly but fairly 
good. Crossing the Calapoovia mountains 
they were forced to do a great deal of walk- 
ing. They made but 38^2 miles that day, 
and reached Oakland at 6.15 p.m. 

The next day being Sunday, they made 
a leisurely run to Roseburg, over an indif- 
ferent road. After dinner they went to 
Myrtle creek for supper. 

After an hour's rest at that town they 
wheeled 5 miles farther and camped for the 
night under a tree on the bank of the 
Mupqua river. It is officially recorded that 
at this point the entire party " took a bath." 

The next entry reads: "Monday Au- 
gust 10th — Left camp at 5.30 and arrived at 
Canyonville 6.30. Cyclometer, 745 7 A- 
Road good. Canyonville is not a good 
place to get meals. Waiter does not know 



enough to make what he has go round." 
From which it may be inferred the Canyon- 
ville breakfast was not altogether satis- 
factory as to quantity; though it is pos- 
sible, that maligned waiter had not hitherto 
had occasion to estimate the capacity of 
biking Mazamas. He should not, there- 
fore, be too much blamed for insufficient 
provision. 

What was lacking in Canyonville was 
made up at Galesville where the wheelmen 
dined sumptuously. The Chinese cook, at 
Galesville, atoned for the stupid waiter at 
Canyonville and in addition was interesting 
by reason of his desire to be sociable in 
" pigeon " English. 

" Cow Creek Crossing, 5 miles from 
Galesville. Stream about 30 feet wide and 
knee-deep. Must wade and carry bikes. 
Reach Wolf Creek Station at 3.00 p.m. 
Cyclometer 770^. Road hilly but good. 
Out of Wolf Creek, follow the telegraph 
line. Top of Wolf Creek Hill 3.50. Cy- 
clometer 772^4. Next hill about 2 l / 2 miles 
long. Too rough and rocky to ride. Tried 
to ride down, but took a header. Wheel 
ran away with me twice." 

Another member of the party fared even 
worse in attempting this descent. In ap- 
plying the brake, after a fashion of his own. 
Dr. Connel had a serious misunderstanding 
with his wheel. When it was over and the 
atmosphere had cleared sufficiently to en- 
able his companions to see him, the doctor 
was found sitting in the middle of the road, 
facing uphill, with his feet through the 
frame of the unlucky bicycle. However, 
neither man nor wheel was damaged and 
after a breathing space the expedition pro- 
ceeded on its way. 

From Grant's pass, which they left Au- 
gust nth at 8.35 they found the roads re- 
markably fine. The roadbed of the S. P. 
railway, being ballasted with decomposed 
granite, forms an excellent bicycle track for 
the greater part of the remaining distance 
to Ashland. The only accidents on this por- 
tion of the journey were a damaged cyclom- 
eter and a punctured tire. 

" Wednesday, August 12. Arrived in 
Ashland for breakfast. Spent the day in 
repairing wheels. Rest of party, 39 in 
number, came in on noon train. 

" August 13th. Left Ashland at 8.15 a.m. 
Cyclometer 834^. Road good first 6 miles, 
when ascent of mountains begins. Climb is 
steep. Impossible to ride, even where 
grade is moderate, on account of loose dirt. 
Whole party arrives at Spout Spring at 
12.30. Luncheon. Reached summit of pass 
at 3.10, cyclometer 849^4. Rapid descent 
for ^4 of a mile. Ride comfortably from 
here to Hunt's ranch, arriving 5 p.m. Went 
into camp and waited 3 hours for cook- 
wagon to come up. Horses had balked at 
lunch-camp. Had a scant evening meal 
and sought our beds." 

Leaving Hunt's the party proceeded 



202 



RECREA TION. 



leisurely, through the rugged wilderness, to 
the Lake of the Woods, a fathomless pool 
into which no streams flow and which has 
no known outlet. They camped over night, 
and were tormented by mosquitoes and 
thirst, for the water is bad. The Mazamas 
divided here, the main body turning aside 
to make the ascent of Mt. Pitt, a snow-peak 
9,250 feet high. The 3 wheelmen went on 
to Pelican bay, on Upper Klamath lake, 
where they had glorious sport catching 
trout, some of which are said to have 
weighed 15 pounds each. 

" Monday August 17th. Mt. Pitt's party 
arrived in camp at Pelican bay about 1 
p.m." They reported a difficult trip, or 
what the official report designates as a 
"regular starveout time;" but after an 



hour's rest and refreshment they were 
ready to press on toward the lake. 

From here on the journey was pleasant 
but uneventful. The roads, for the most 
part, being fairly good. At the foot of Mt. 
Mazama they made the last camp, before 
reaching the lake. The last entry, in Pro- 
fessor McClure's note book, records the 
fact that when in sight of the lake the cy- 
clometer registered 887^, and leaves the 
rest to the imagination of the reader. 
However, it is known that these 3 dauntless 
wheelmen made the return trip with ease, 
and that by actual experience they have 
proved the possibility and pleasantness of 
bicycle mountaineering. They were the 
first to make this long and rugged journey 
by wheel, but will not be the last. 



A CANOE CRUISE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA. 



S. B. BUCKMASTER, M.D. 



" Give me of your bark O birch tree ! 

Of your yellow bark O birch tree ! 

Growing by the rushing river, 
. Tall and stately in the valley. 

I a light canoe will build me, 

Build a swift cheemaun for sailing, 

That shall float upon the river, 

Like a yellow leaf in autumn, 

Like a yellow water lily." 

Years of application to an exacting pro- 
fession have failed to still the desire for the 
piny wilderness, always felt, and but partly 
gratified nearly a quarter of a century ago, 
when a lad, in the beautiful valley lying in 
the shadow of mighty Shasta, in Northern 
California. Their summer vacations gave 
opportunities for camping and hunting; 
so one fall, when my friend, Dr. Hart, of 
the Leech lake Indian Agency, in Northern 
Minnesota, invited me to visit him, I joy- 
fully arranged for a 2 weeks' absence. 

A day's ride to Brainerd, and a farther 
ride of 60 miles Northward, brought me to 
the town of Walker, on Leech lake, where 
my friend met me at the train. Embark- 
ing on a little steamer, filled with Chippe- 
was, we soon reached the agency, located 
on the shore of beautiful Leech lake, with 
its 425 miles of pine-clad shores. Here is 
the reservation of the Pillager band of 
Chippewas, numbering some 1,500. 

The following day arrangements were 
completed for our dash into the wilderness. 
In the afternoon we embarked in 2 birch- 
bark canoes. 

Our party consisted of C , the prin- 
cipal of the Government school for Indian 
children; my friend and me; Mart, whose 
knowledge of Chippewa and woodcraft did 
much to make the trip successful; and 2 
men to do the work. 



We journeyed Northward for 5 days, glid- 
ing past beautiful pine groves, interspersed 
with deciduous growths, taking on their 
autumnal livery; through winding rivers: 
across wide lakes; amid vast beds of wild 
rice, from which the mallards arose in 
thousands; on through Winnebegoshish; 
beyond the Mississippi, near its source; 
and, with a 12-mile portage through the 
pine woods, reached the Bowstring river. 
Down the Bowstring; through dense for- 
ests, with waving grass meadows inter- 
spersed, in which could be seen many trails 
of moose and deer. On past Moore river, 
into the big fork of Rainy river, we pad- 
dled, every hour replete with the pleasure 
which comes to the wilderness lover. 

Everywhere the Chippewas were busy 
gathering wild rice, beating it into canoes, 
while paddling through it. It was taken 
ashore and parched in large kettles, by 
squaws. The bucks then hulled the rice, by 
trampling, barefooted, on it, in a hole in the 
ground. Tossing it in the air, in large 
birch trays, served to separate all the dirt 
thought necessary, by these none too par- 
ticular feeders. I found it quite palatable, 
when boiled, until personal observation 
showed me how it was prepared. After 
that, camp biscuits and game were good 
enough. 

One afternoon we landed at an Indian 
village. Entering a birch-bark tepee, to 
see if I could buy some venison or moose 
meat (the Indians on the reservation pay 
little heed to game laws), a party of bucks 
was seen seated on the ground, around a 
red blanket, too deeply interested in a game 
of poker to heed the stranger. A request 
of the chief for permission to take their 



INTERNATIONAL ITEMS. 



203 



picture, was curtly refused, through super- 
stitious belief that harm would follow. A 
judicious contribution to the pot, however, 
enabled me to get a snap-shot, while they 
grabbed for the coin. 

On the next day we reached the camp of 
a gentleman, who, with his wife, was spend- 
ing the summer in the woods. We enjoyed 
their hospitality 2 days, before starting 
on our return trip. He had a very com- 
plete camp and outfit. With him, besides a 
colored cook, were 4 men, who assisted in 
hunting and fishing. On some of the neigh- 
boring lakes, with which this region 
abounds, this man had canoes, so bounti- 
ful strings of bass, walleyed pike and pick- 
erel were easily secured. 

But why 

44 Sing of the happy days that followed 
In the land of the Ojibways, 
In the pleasant land and peaceful." 

Why tell of voracious appetites; of sleep- 
ing on the ground, where 

" Weariness 
Can snore upon the flint, when resty sloth 
Finds the downy pillow hard." 

On the return we varied the trip by 
portaging 4 miles across from the Bow- 
string to the Cutfoot Sioux river; then 
paddling down this to Lake Winnebegosh- 
ish, and down the Mississippi, among the 
rice beds, in which we found ducks in great 
numbers. Walleyed pike and pickerel 
might have been caught by the boat load. 



We paddled down the swift current of the 
Mississippi, to the mouth of Leech river; 
and from there with a hard day's work, 
reached the Government dam in Leech 
lake. This dam and one on the Missis- 
sippi, where it flows from Lake Winnebe- 
goshish, are large, expensive Government 
structures for maintaining a high stage of 
water in the upper Mississippi. 

At Leech lake the keeper of the dam has 
a pair of moose, in his pasture, which he 
hopes to sell to some collection. 

Less than 10 hours' paddling brought us 
back to the agency, after an absence of 13 
days, during which a journey of 300 miles 
in canoes had been made. I secured a col- 
lection of pictures and other trophies that 
will long serve as reminders of a rough, 
but exceedingly pleasant trip. The woods 
were full of grouse; the waters swarmed 
with fish; ducks were abundant; while 
moose and deer were seen in fair numbers. 
Big game is killed by the Indians at all 
seasons. One day we met a native in a 
canoe, in whose cap were 2 feathers, sig- 
nifying he had killed 2 Sioux. This brave's 
canoe was half filled with the meat of a 
moose just killed, .a large piece of which 
he willingly parted with. 

The country is wild — no roads nor trails 
— accessible only by canoe journeys; so, in 
spite of the slaughter by Indians, game is 
plentiful. 

The Leech lake region is destined to be- 
come popular with those seeking a good 
camping, hunting and fishing country. 



INTERNATIONAL ITEMS. 



F. L. OSWALD. 



A NATURAL GAME PRESERVE. 

The/ happiest hunting-ground of the 
Eastern Continent is, at present, probably 
the Elbrus range, # on the South shore of the 
Caspian and some 200 miles East of the 
Russian Caucasus. Deer, wild goats, elk, 
wolves, bears, leopards, foxes and badgers 
abound in the uplands; in the summit 
regions of the mountains, which attain a 
height of 18,000 feet above tidewater, there 
are chamois and wild sheep, and in the 
coast jungles tigers, darker and somewhat 
larger than the Bengal variety. Wild hogs 
also abound, and the foothill region is the 
original home of the wild pheasant, and 
now almost its last refuge, since the pheas- 
ant river, the Caucasian Phasis, has ceased 
to deserve its name. The climate is that of 
Southern Italy, minus the sirocco, and can 
give one an idea what weather the coast- 
lands of the Mediterranean may have en- 



joyed before the destruction of the great 
sylvania which once stretched from the 
Black Sea to the shores of the Atlantic. 



BEAR-DENS OF THE ANDES. 

A curious instance of zoological isola- 
tion is the existence of bears in the Andes 
of Southern Chili. How did they get 
there? If by migration from the California 
Sierras, why did they not establish half- 
way colonies in Mexico and Ecuador, 
where a complete stock of assorted cli- 
mates might have been secured at pre-emp- 
tion rates? But they must have hastened 
on till they could see their noontide shadow 
as plain as in British North America, and. 
like the brook-trout of New Zealand, have 
now to solve the problem of survival at a 
distance of 6,000 miles from the homes of 
their next relatives. 



204 



RECREA TION. 



CANINE CANNIBALS. 

" Man's truest friend " seems now and 
then apt to resent neglect in a rather em- 
phatic way of his own. The khelp el kamr, 
or " desert dogs," of Southern Syria, have 
degenerated into perfect beasts of prey, and 
are so scandalized at the sleek appearance 
of a pet pug that they will tear him limb 
from limb, with all the fury of famished 
wolves. Small parties of travellers risk 
sharing the fate of their canine companions, 
and, according to a report from Sidi Harat, 
some 80 miles Southwest of Damascus, an 
old Sheik was recently rent and eaten by 
a pack of ravenous khelps within 100 yards 
of his own rancho. In stress of circum- 
stances, desert dogs do not scruple to 
attack even the decrepit patriarchs of their 
own tribe, a propensity which seems to ex- 
plain the occasional appearance of a soli- 
tary khelp, who will retire to the rocks of 
the barren uplands and starve like the edi- 
tor of a Texas temperance paper, rather 
than tempt the appetites of his own kins- 
men. 

MOSQUITO REMEDIES. 

Every hunter in Eastern Arkansas has a 
gnat recipe of his own, but like the pan- 
acea of the world-renouncing Buddhists, 
those prescriptions are generally worse 
than the evil itself. Muck-smoke makes 
a bedroom untenable, and inunctions of 
kerosene oil engender villainous night- 
mares; but Dr. Otto Wiegand of Port Isa- 
bel, Guatemala, recommends a mixture of 
vaseline, neroli (orange peel oil) and ex- 
tract of artemisia absinthium, as both effec- 
tive and inoffensive. The natives use lard 
instead of vaseline and dispense with the 
neroli, which impresses Caucasian olfac- 
tories with the net result of a perfume but 
does not deceive the keener senses of tip- 
ulary insects. They dread artemisia juice 
as an elixir of death and recognize it in any 
admixture, even through the tobacco 
smoke of a Spanish-American bedroom. 

OPEN AIR MENAGERIES. 

The Darwinian pets in the zoological 
garden of Lima, Peru, live twice as long as 
their kinsmen in Northern prisons, though 
they are kept in open-air cages, as we 
would keep eagles or crows. Their diet is 
decidedly mixed: cornbread, beans, dried 
beef, bananas and potatoes, flavored with 
red pepper and the cigar stumps of mis- 
chievous visitors. Scrubbing day comes 
only once a week, and the regulations 
against youngsters with pea-shooters are 
not very strictly enforced, but the more lib- 
eral allowance of fresh air compensates all 
that, even in winter, when the mercury on 
that airy plateau sometimes sinks to within 
10 degrees of the freezing point. Not lack 
of warmth, but lack of ventilation is the 
main cause of man and monkey-killing 



lung-diseases, and consumptives should visit 
the railway park of Old Fort, North Caro- 
lina, where a pair of Magabey apes have 
been kept alive for years in a garden-house 
without a stove — with open lattice work all 
around, and with a few bundles of hay as 
the only refuge from winter storms. 

BULLET-PROOF JACKETS. 

Henrick Dowe, the inventor of the mys- 
terious bullet-proof mail coats, died with- 
out having been able to come to terms with 
the Government Commissioners, and his 
secret is now in the hands of a Berlin syn- 
dicate, who claim to have improved an in- 
vention that may turn the tide of the next 
international war. Bullets that strike clear 
through 10 inches of hard oakwood fail to 
penetrate pads z x A inches thick and might 
bruise but could hardly kill a soldier in a 
cap-a-pie suit of the protective fabric. Its 
moderate weight proves its non-metallic 
composition, and Captain Bischoff, of the 
last Prussian commission, inclines to the 
opinion that the outer cover, of stout can- 
vas, conceals a network of knotted rawhide, 
thongs. 

AQUATIC DUELLOS. 

The featherless fighting cocks of France 
are said to have tried all forms of single 
combat from butting matches to Texas rifle 
matinees, but would probably draw the line 
at the aquatic duels of the Marquesas 
islanders. The rival Don Juans of the be- 
nighted archipelago hurry to the nearest 
coral reef, leap off, and meeting in deep 
water, attack one another with the fury of 
love-crazed fish-otters. They use short, 
crooked daggers, and the chances of the 
contest are complicated by their trick of 
diving and trying to tackle their antagonist 
from below. 

FOURFOOTED OUTLAWS. 

The boasted abundance of game in some 
parts of Central Europe seems due to a lack 
of enterprise on the part of the native 
peasants, as much as to the vigilance of 
forest wardens, for the remarkable sur- 
vivals include creatures that have never en- 
joyed the benefits of legislative protection. 
Lynxes still hold their own in the Black 
Forest and in the French Jura, and troops 
of wolves continue to haunt the highlands 
of the Cevennes and all the large woodlands 
of the vast area extending from the Niemen 
to the Ural. A still more scandalous fact 
is their existence in